WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

How to cook rice perfectly: Boiling rice like pasta is the key to fluffy grains

Have you cooked rice wrong your whole life? That’s why it should be cooked just like pasta for an airy result every time

  • A food scientist revealed that cooking rice like pasta produces ‘perfectly fluffy’ rice
  • Jennifer, from Vancouver, doesn’t measure her rice or water accurately at all
  • She instead just uses a colander to drain the excess water after it boils
  • The technique also works for most grains, including quinoa, barley, amaranth

A food scientist has revealed that cooking rice like pasta produces “perfect” and “fluffy” rice every time.

Jennifer Pallian, from Vancouver, is known for sharing niche cooking tips and original recipes backed by nutritional science about her Instagram account

“This rice hack will change your life,” she said. ‘That’s how my mother-in-law makes rice in India.’

“Instead of accurately measuring your rice and water and hoping for the best, just fill a large pot with water like you would for pasta.”

Scroll down for video.

A food scientist revealed that cooking rice like pasta produces perfectly fluffy rice every time

A food scientist revealed that cooking rice like pasta produces perfectly fluffy rice every time

She added the rice and cooked over low heat until soft, straining out the excess water with a colander.

“You get airy, loose grains every time – or in other words, perfect rice!” she said.

And similar to the traditional method of cooking pasta, Jennifer adds about 2 teaspoons of salt per 4 cups of water.

The food scientist also revealed that the technique wasn’t just limited to rice, and that it worked just as well for most grains, including quinoa, barley, amaranth and millet.

She also suggested that because of the unconventional method, chefs may need to check the rice five minutes earlier than the package indicates.

“It takes me about 15 minutes to cook white basmati, but I usually check the grains earlier than usual,” she said.

Jennifer revealed that she just fills a big pot with water like she would for pasta and puts in the rice

The food scientist said she doesn't use accurate measurements for the rice or water

Jennifer Pallian said that instead of accurately measuring out her rice and water and hoping for the best, she just fills a large pot with water like she would for pasta and puts the rice in it.

The food scientist also revealed that the technique wasn't just limited to rice, and that it worked just as well for most grains, including quinoa, barley, amaranth and millet.

The food scientist also revealed that the technique wasn’t just limited to rice, and that it worked just as well for most grains, including quinoa, barley, amaranth and millet.

Jennifer’s post got hundreds of responses, and many shared their own tips and tricks for cooking rice.

“Basmati rice in particular benefits from soaking and washing,” said one woman.

She added: ‘Soaking improves the aromatic taste because it doesn’t need to be cooked as long. It also helps to make the rice more digestible.’

“I’ve found that a little pat of butter or a dollop of ghee is great too!”

‘Sometimes I add vegetable stock instead of salt for an extra kick of flavour.’

“I always strain my rice in extra water after cooking – it removes excess starch and always results in an extremely fluffy end result,” added a fourth.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More