Home Australia How the healthiest people in the world live longer: Beauty Chef founder Carla Oates lists five rules people in ‘Blue Zones’ follow

How the healthiest people in the world live longer: Beauty Chef founder Carla Oates lists five rules people in ‘Blue Zones’ follow

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A top Australian beauty founder (pictured) has broken down the five rules those living longer follow for optimal health, and the beauty and diet secrets she follows at 51.

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A top Australian beauty founder has broken down the five rules those living longer follow, and her own life and diet secrets at 51.

Carla Oates, the founder of The beauty cookshared his key takeaways inspired by Live to the 100: Secrets of the Blue Zonesa film where journalist Dan Buettner visits the five places in the world with the most centenarians (those 100 years or older).

The zones include Okinawa, Japan, Sardinia, Italy, Nicoya, Costa Rica, Ikaria, Greece and Loma Linda, California. Those who live in each of them share a series of behaviors that are believed to contribute to their life expectancy being higher than average.

These include a plant-rich diet, regular physical activity, conscious alcohol consumption, ideal sleep habits, and active social lives/communities.

‘Although moving to a remote island sounds quite dreamy, the key to good health and longevity lies in lifestyle habits. “Here are the top five shared traits you can easily test no matter where you live,” Carla said.

A top Australian beauty founder (pictured) has broken down the five rules those living longer follow for optimal health, and the beauty and diet secrets she follows at 51.

Adopt a plant-rich diet

Whole grains and beans dominate meals in Blue Zones, combined with seasonal fruits and vegetables.

In all five zones, plant-based foods make up an average of 95 percent of their diet. In some areas, pork, chicken and lamb are also consumed in small quantities.

As a result, these diets are packed with fiber and prebiotics that support greater gut health and microbiome diversity.

The founder of Beauty Chef shares her daily routine at 51 years old

Diet

Carla’s diet is full of plants and proteins; she makes sure to eat three vegetarian meals every week.

‘I also always start the day with Essential Inner Beauty Glowwhether stirred into a glass of filtered water or blended into a delicious smoothie,” Carla told FEMAIL.

The $69 purchase is the brand’s flagship and best-selling product.

Carla’s smoothies typically include papaya, banana, blueberries, coconut milk, and chia seeds.

At lunchtime, Carla looks for a “good salad mix” with lots of “green leafy vegetables, seeds and nuts” with a protein source such as fish, tempeh, chicken or legumes.

Dinner consists of more vegetables with protein in the form of a slow-cooked curry, stew, soup or roast.

Body

Carla takes care of her body through regular moderate exercise such as walking and Pilates.

‘I try to walk most mornings. “I describe walking as a natural filing system for my brain: it provides mental clarity, gives me energy and helps me prepare for the day,” said Carla.

He also likes to “have fun” and “laugh as much as possible.”

“It helps the body eliminate stress, which is great for gut and skin health, and provides a glow that no cosmetics can replicate,” she said.

Fur

‘When I get home from my morning walk, the first thing I do is stir Essential Inner Beauty Glow, Increased inner beauty of collagen and Omega Elixir in water,” he said.

She cleans with Sodashi Soothing Clay Cleanserand use a Probiotic Skin Refiner.

She uses The Beauty Chef herself. Glow FACIAL Oil on her skin and neck and likes to use The Beauty Chef’s Flora Fix Balm on his lips and eyes.

At night, you will do the same and also add a moisturizer. Supernatural Cream by Emma Lewisham is his favorite – to his regime.

Move frequently, daily

Buettner’s team observed that people within the Blue Zones were asked to move approximately every 20 minutes. These movements were not necessarily exercises, but rather natural, everyday movements related to activities such as gardening, kneading bread, operating tools, dancing, and walking.

Outside of Blue Zones, physical activity has been shown to improve mortality. In a study of more than 60,000 people, those who did 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise a week, compared to those who did none, had a 20 percent lower mortality rate.

Wine is often the drink of choice and is consumed with friends while eating, rather than consumed in excess in Blue Zones.

Wine is often the drink of choice and is consumed with friends while eating, rather than consumed in excess in Blue Zones.

Drink consciously

With the exception of California Adventists, people in Blue Zones drink moderately: up to one drink a day for women and two for men.

Wine is often the drink of choice and is consumed with friends during a meal rather than consumed in excess.

Sardinians are especially known for their robust regional red wine called Cannonau, which has two to three times more flavonoids (a source of antioxidants) than other wines.

Staying socially connected was another commonality among all Blue Zones. In Ikaria, Sardinia, and Nicoya, people frequently stop to chat with neighbors as they pass by and often connect with friends at daily happy hours.

Staying socially connected was another commonality among all Blue Zones. In Ikaria, Sardinia, and Nicoya, people frequently stop to chat with neighbors as they pass by and often connect with friends at daily happy hours.

Prioritize sleep

About one in three Australian adults do not sleep the recommended minimum amount of seven hours a night.

Meanwhile, people in the Blue Zones rise with the sun and sleep with the night, regularly reaching between seven and nine hours. In Ikaria and Sardinia, daytime naps are also common and there is evidence to suggest that a short nap can improve brain health.

Spend time in the community

Staying socially connected was another commonality among all Blue Zones. In Ikaria, Sardinia, and Nicoya, people frequently stop to chat with neighbors as they pass by and often connect with friends at daily happy hours.

About half of Okinawans also belong to a ‘moai’, a group of people who meet weekly or more to share hobbies, interests and support each other.

Considering that research has linked loneliness and social isolation to a variety of mental and health conditions, there are many positive aspects to staying connected.

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