How the Greens make plans to impose an extreme left agenda on Australia

If the Greens had their way, conservative opinions in the media would be banned, drugs such as ecstasy legalized, and private schools phased out.

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While the hard-left political party does not win elections, it continues to share the balance of power in the Australian Parliament, enabling it to shape national laws.

It is unlikely that the Greens will ever win the government on their own – scoring only 10.4 percent of the lower house votes in last month's federal elections.

This was a tiny increase from the 10.23 percent share they received in 2016 when they campaigned in May to ban coal-fired power plants within 11 years.

If the Greens had their way, conservative opinions in the media would be banned, drugs such as ecstasy (photo is a stock image) would be legalized and private schools would be phased out

If the Greens had their way, conservative opinions in the media would be banned, drugs such as ecstasy (photo is a stock image) would be legalized and private schools would be phased out

However, the Greens still remain ambitious, with the party's founder, Bob Brown in 2011, predicting that it would one day replace Labor as Australia's most important party on the left.

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Before that happens, the Greens have set their sights on maintaining the balance of power in the senate within three years – forcing which major party is in the government to adopt their agenda to get laws approved.

And it's no secret – party leader Richard Di Natale stated this as the party's goal this week.

He claimed a 0.17 percentage point increase in their primary vote as a sign of political success, even though the senate's figures remained at nine.

& # 39; If we repeat this result in 2022, we will see an additional three senators and we will see the Greens with only balance of power in the Senate based on these figures & # 39 ;, said Senator Di Natale earlier this month to Sky News .

Griffith University political lecturer Paul Williams said that the Greens had an external opportunity to have a crossbench monopoly in the upper house of the federal parliament.

& # 39; It is wrong that they can only have power relationships & # 39 ;, he told Daily Mail Australia.

It is unlikely that the Greens will ever win the government on their own - only 10.4 percent of the lower house votes in last month's federal elections while campaigning to ban coal-fired power plants by 2030 (photos) are Australian women working in the resource sector))

It is unlikely that the Greens will ever win the government on their own - only 10.4 percent of the lower house votes in last month's federal elections while campaigning to ban coal-fired power plants by 2030 (photos) are Australian women working in the resource sector))

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It is unlikely that the Greens will ever win the government on their own – only 10.4 percent of the lower house votes in last month's federal elections while campaigning to ban coal-fired power plants by 2030 (photos) are Australian women working in the resource sector))

Greens leader Richard Di Natale (photo) has stated that his party wants to have the balance of power in the senate to itself within three years - forcing which big party is in power to set their agenda to get laws approved

Greens leader Richard Di Natale (photo) has stated that his party wants to have the balance of power in the senate to itself within three years - forcing which big party is in power to set their agenda to get laws approved

Greens leader Richard Di Natale (photo) has stated that his party wants to have the balance of power in the senate to itself within three years – forcing which big party is in power to set their agenda to get laws approved

After the 2010 elections, the Greens were able to impose a hated carbon tax on Australia, following the failure of the Labor Party of former Prime Minister Julia Gillard to secure a majority in the House of Representatives.

WHAT THE GREENS WANT FOR AUSTRALIA

The New South Wales branch of the Greens proposes to legalize not only marijuana but also ecstasy

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& # 39; Ensure regulated delivery of cannabis and MDMA to adults in NSW & # 39 ;, it says on its website

They also want to prevent government funds from supporting the church schools, even though it has been a federal policy since 1964

& # 39;Abolish all government funding from non-governmental schools, & he said

The Australian greens have a plan to ban coal-fired power plants within eleven years

& # 39;The Greens plan will gradually phase out coal, build a clean energy export industry and set an ambitious target of 100 percent renewable energy by 2030. & # 39;

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The leader of the party, Richard Di Natale, also made no secret of his plan to regulate the media, silence conservative media commentators

& # 39; We're going to make sure we have laws that regulate our media so that if people like Andrew Bolt and Alan Jones and Chris Kenny – and I can go on and on – if they want to use hate speech to divide the community, then they will be called to account for that hateful language, & he said

However, a small party in the Senate has not had power relations with itself for almost twenty years.

This was at a time when the center-left Australian Democrats successfully demanded that fruits and vegetables be exempted from the GST, as proposed by a liberal-national government of the party.

Dr. Williams said that the fracturing of the less important party vote led to a high demand for the Greens in the Senate in 2022.

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& # 39; I can't see for a moment that they are only Greens, Labor and the L-NP & # 39 ;, he said.

In recent weeks, Senator Di Natale has expressed his support for freedom of the press after the Australian Federal Police raid on the ABC and the home of journalist Annika Smethurst of News Corp Australia in Canberra.

Three months ago, however, the Victorian senator told supporters at Brunswick, in Melbourne & # 39; s inside-north, he would try to ban conservative commentators ranging from Sydney radio 2GB channel Alan Jones to Sky News hosts Andrew Bolt and Chris Kenny .

& # 39; We're going to make sure we have laws that regulate our media so that if people like Andrew Bolt and Alan Jones and Chris Kenny – and I can go on and on – if they want to use hate speech to divide the community, then they will be called to account for that hateful language, & he said.

Dr. Williams said the Greens and Workers both wanted more press regulation, however impractical, because they were suspicious of conservative media.

& # 39; Given that Alan Jones dominates radio waves, I'm not sure how you would regulate that, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; I think we'll see more of maybe Labor and the Greens talk about issues like giving teeth to press boards and the like.

& # 39; The only thing they can do is perhaps reinforce Section 18C, to ensure that there is a future shock jock, potentially exploiting anti-Islam sentiment in the community. & # 39;

Section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act already forbids comment that minority groups might offend or insult.

When Labor was last in power six years ago, it suggested setting up a new media regulator with the support of the Greens.

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The radical policy of the Greens does not stop here, if the party's New South Wales branch is a guide.

It argued for legislation, not just for marijuana, but also for ecstasy, as part of the & # 39; Medicines Regulation and Harm Minimalization & # 39; plan.

& # 39; Ensure regulated delivery of cannabis and MDMA to adults in NSW & # 39 ;, it says on its website.

Three months ago, Senator Di Natale told supporters in Brunswick, Melbourne & # 39; s trendy inland, he wanted to ban conservative commentators ranging from the Sydney radio 2GB channel Alan Jones (photo) to Sky News hosts Andrew Bolt and Chris Kenny

Three months ago, Senator Di Natale told supporters in Brunswick, Melbourne & # 39; s trendy inland, he wanted to ban conservative commentators ranging from the Sydney radio 2GB channel Alan Jones (photo) to Sky News hosts Andrew Bolt and Chris Kenny

Three months ago, Senator Di Natale told supporters in Brunswick, Melbourne & # 39; s trendy inland, he wanted to ban conservative commentators ranging from the Sydney radio 2GB channel Alan Jones (photo) to Sky News hosts Andrew Bolt and Chris Kenny

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New South Wales upper house Greens MP Cate Faehrmann, party spokeswoman on drug reform and harm reduction, defended the policy of legalizing cannabis and ecstasy.

& # 39; There are indications that compared to alcohol and other drugs, marijuana and MDMA cause much less harm to individual users and society & # 39 ;, she told Daily Mail Australia.

& # 39; Regulating supply would ensure quality control, remove harmful and potentially deadly substances and would be much safer than buying from the black market. & # 39;

While the Greens are liberal about drug policy, that notion of freedom does not pass on to parents who want to send their children to a private school run by the church.

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Religious schools have received federal funding since 1964, with the policy enjoying the support of both major parties for more than five decades.

In his policy manifesto, the Greens declared war on private schools stating that non-governmental schools should not receive tax money (photos are students of St Josephs College in Brisbane)
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In his policy manifesto, the Greens declared war on private schools stating that non-governmental schools should not receive tax money (photos are students of St Josephs College in Brisbane)

In his policy manifesto, the Greens declared war on private schools stating that non-governmental schools should not receive tax money (photos are students of St Josephs College in Brisbane)

In his policy manifesto, the Greens declared war on private schools, including Catholic schools in poorer areas that rely on public funding for survival.

& # 39; Eliminate all government funding from non-governmental schools & # 39 ;, said the party's NSW website.

Dr. Williams said that this kind of policy alienates the voters of the Greens, who are on average richer.

Griffith University political teacher Paul Williams said that Greens voters were richer and sent their children to private schools

Griffith University political teacher Paul Williams said that Greens voters were richer and sent their children to private schools

Griffith University political teacher Paul Williams said that Greens voters were richer and sent their children to private schools

& # 39; You will see that many Greens parents vote with children in private schools – that would be a very large number, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; Greens receive disproportionate support from very well-educated, high-income people, many of whom would send their children to private schools.

& # 39; Some of them would say it is fair and that the government is not contributing to their local private school, but there are many who say: & # 39; No, wait a minute, we are also taxpayers and we would like to see non-government also get financing ". & # 39;

David Shoebridge, a member of parliament from the Greens in NSW, defended the party's position in private schools.

& # 39; It is indefensible to continue to give public money to exclusive private schools to build their second stage for performing arts while public schools and students are in need, & he said to Daily Mail Australia.

Compared to the NSW branch, Australian greens are a bit more nuanced at private schools.

Nevertheless, they are lukewarm about financing taxpayers for non-governmental schools and declare that it should not benefit from private education at the expense of public education.

Dr. Williams said the Greens would be better off paying attention to environmental issues.

& # 39; The Greens need to go back to their base, and that is really environmental policy and ecotourism and getting jobs for environmental protection & # 39 ;, he said.

Daily Mail Australia was looking for a response from Senator Di Natale, but he refused to address one of the policy issues raised.

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