How the Bulldogs & # 039; the celebrations of Mad Monday could ruin YOUR Christmas party

Christmas parties and private functions are now in the line of fire of draconian liquor laws that make it illegal for people to get drunk in pubs (stock image)

Christmas parties and private functions are now in the line of fire of draconian liquor laws that make it illegal for people to get drunk in pubs.

At the Crazy Monday celebrations of the Canterbury Bulldogs, the 63-year-old licensee of the Harbor View Hotel in the heart of Sydney suffered five penalty notifications.

The police issued three of the notices for alleged violation of the New South Wales Liquor Act by allowing intoxication on the premises during the club's private event.

As a result, the pub could face heavy fines, face restrictions on trading hours or even be closed, which would have a chilling effect on Sydney pubs before the holiday season.

Christmas parties and private functions are now in the line of fire of draconian liquor laws that make it illegal for people to get drunk in pubs (stock image)

Christmas parties and private functions are now in the line of fire of draconian liquor laws that make it illegal for people to get drunk in pubs (stock image)

Crazy Monday celebrations of the Canterbury Bulldogs saw the 63-year license holder of the Harbor View Hotel in the heart of Sydney with five penalty notifications

Crazy Monday celebrations of the Canterbury Bulldogs saw the 63-year license holder of the Harbor View Hotel in the heart of Sydney with five penalty notifications

Crazy Monday celebrations of the Canterbury Bulldogs saw the 63-year license holder of the Harbor View Hotel in the heart of Sydney with five penalty notifications

The Harbor View Hotel told Daily Mail Australia that they could not comment on the police action, other than saying that the Liquor Law was clear.

The Australian Hotel Association said that customers in licensed establishments should be able to enjoy Christmas parties in the office.

"Customers who attend end-of-season events or similar functions should have the right to let their hair down," said AHA NSW liquor and police director John Green.

& # 39; But [they] you must remember that there are both behavioral and legislative responsibilities that govern what you can and can not do. "

"The locals work closely with the police and the regulator throughout the year, and especially during larger events, to ensure that people have a good time, without exaggerating and risking security or sanctions."

Former Labor leader Mark Latham criticized the sanctions, describing them as a "joke" and questioning whether he should have had any legal consequences.

The police issued three of the notices for alleged infringement of the New South Wales Liquor Act by allowing intoxication on the premises during the club's private event (stock image)

The police issued three of the notices for alleged infringement of the New South Wales Liquor Act by allowing intoxication on the premises during the club's private event (stock image)

The police issued three of the notices for alleged infringement of the New South Wales Liquor Act by allowing intoxication on the premises during the club's private event (stock image)

"Have any of the members of the public complained or the scam of the police action put them into action out of outrage from the media?" I ask.

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Do you think pubs should be punished for drinking customers?

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"If it's the latest, it's a complete and total waste of police resources." As are the charges against Bulldog players.

& # 39; If no member of the public has been harmed, why the need for any action?

& # 39; What a joke. & # 39;

The New South Wales Liquor Act of 2007 makes it illegal for licensees to allow intoxication or sell or supply liquor to an intoxicated person.

If applied with such zeal as against the host of the crazy Monday celebration, these laws would spell the end of the office Christmas party, a traditionally drunken affair.

Satya Marar, Policy Director of the Australian Taxpayers & Alliance, said that punishing licensed establishments for their clients' actions was unfair.

The pub could be punished with heavy fines, face restrictions of hours of negotiation or even be closed, which would have a chilling effect on the pubs of Sydney before the festive season (stock image)

The pub could be punished with heavy fines, face restrictions of hours of negotiation or even be closed, which would have a chilling effect on the pubs of Sydney before the festive season (stock image)

The pub could be punished with heavy fines, face restrictions of hours of negotiation or even be closed, which would have a chilling effect on the pubs of Sydney before the festive season (stock image)

"Our laws should promote a thriving nightlife making sure that people are responsible for their own actions," said Marar.

"Hitting the pubs with penalty notices every time someone is caught misbehaving is an infallible recipe for fewer expensive pubs, drinks and functions, and restrictions for businesses and partygoers who do not deserve it.

WHAT DOES THE LAW SAY?

In accordance with the New South Wales Liquor Act 2007, Section 73, licensees can not allow intoxication at their facilities, nor sell or supply liquor to an intoxicated person.

It is considered that they have allowed intoxication unless they can demonstrate that they asked the intoxicated person to leave, called the police or refused to serve them more alcohol.

Infractions of the Liquor Act may result in the licensees receiving a strike, and three strikes may result in the closure.

Source: Liquor Act 2007

"The nanny's state restrictions have already turned unique access points like Sydney into a ghost town with a nightlife that is an international shame."

In March, a new jazz club of Kings Cross, Prohibition, was forced to close its doors just a day after it started operating after a single customer was not scanned at the entrance.

Owner Ian Chandler told Daily Mail Australia at the time that the undercover license officers entered the premises on the first day.

After noticing that a client was not scanned, the agent told Chandler that he faced fines of tens of thousands of dollars in fines, and that he had no choice but to close.

"It's death by a thousand cuts," he said, and said the maze of legal restrictions and regulations was killing Sydney's nightlife.

The ban is one of the dozens of places authorized to be punished in recent years, and ten closure orders have been issued since 2015.

Daily Mail Australia contacted Harbor View Hotel and Liquor and Gaming New South Wales to get their comments.

Former Labor leader Mark Latham criticized the sanctions, describing them as a "joke" and questioning whether there should have been any legal consequences (in the photo, on the left, is the Bulldogs player Adam Elliot)

Former Labor leader Mark Latham criticized the sanctions, describing them as a "joke" and questioning whether there should have been any legal consequences (in the photo, on the left, is the Bulldogs player Adam Elliot)

Former Labor leader Mark Latham criticized the sanctions, describing them as a "joke" and questioning whether there should have been any legal consequences (in the photo, on the left, is the Bulldogs player Adam Elliot)

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