WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

How patients in some parts of Great Britain wait TWO YEARS for NHS treatment

People suffering from chronic pain in some cases wait more than two years for treatment to treat their debilitating symptoms.

Data show that 87 percent of NHS clinics last longer than an eight-week goal set by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP).

The worst NHS Highland in Scotland scores patients between 40 and 112 weeks. Second is the Royal Free Hospital in London where patients are seen for an average of 37 weeks.

Without treatment, patients can live with pain that is so debilitating that some even consider suicide, research has shown.

The data shows that 87 percent of NHS clinics last longer than an eight-week goal set by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). Patients at the Royal Free Hospital in London are seen for an average of 37 weeks, while patients treated by NHS Highland in Scotland wait between 40 and 112 weeks

The data shows that 87 percent of NHS clinics last longer than an eight-week goal set by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). Patients at the Royal Free Hospital in London are seen for an average of 37 weeks, while patients treated by NHS Highland in Scotland wait between 40 and 112 weeks

Chronic pain is defined as pain that lasts longer than 12 weeks despite medication or treatment.

It is thought to affect 28 million adults in the UK, with up to 14 percent of patients claiming that their discomfort has made them severely disabled. It is estimated that one in five adults in the US suffers from this.

According to guidelines from the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), the waiting time for an appointment must not exceed eight weeks.

And the NHS says that patients should not wait longer than 18 weeks between referral by their doctor and treatment for non-urgent problems.

But the latest research shows that patients in Great Britain wait much longer.

Data obtained from a Freedom of Information request show that patients in some NHS clinics wait more than two years for treatment.

Experts say that longer waiting times often mean that a patient’s health deteriorates by the time they get help.

Dr. Lorraine de Gray, pain counselor at Lynn of Queen Elizabeth Hospital King in Norfolk, said: ‘My experience with seeing patients in the pain clinic is that it took a long, long time before they were actually there.

“And many of them have lost faith in the medical world by the time they do that.”

WHAT HOSPITAL CLINICA TAKEN THE LONGEST TO SEE CHRONIC PAIN PATIENTS?

  1. NHS Highland: between 40 and 112 weeks
  2. Royal Free London: 37 weeks
  3. Countess of Chester hospital: 35 weeks
  4. Whittingdon Health NHS Trust: between 32 and 60 weeks
  5. Mid and South Essex University Hospitals Group: 27 weeks
  6. Swansea Bay University Health Board: 24 weeks
  7. Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board: 24 weeks
  8. Hywel Dda University Health Board: 21 weeks
  9. NHS Grampian: 20 weeks
  10. Newcastle upon Tyne NHS Hospitals Foundation Trust: 19 weeks

The data, revealed by The Pharmaceutical Journal, showed that 87 percent of the 39 NHS clinics that responded to the information request took longer than the eight-week IASP goal to treat patients.

In addition, 26 percent of the pain clinics in England and Scotland took longer than 18 weeks to see patients.

In Wales, four out of five providers had an average waiting time of 20 weeks, although this was within the NHS Wales goal to see patients within 36 weeks.

NHS Highland said the average wait for his pain management service varied from 40 to 112 weeks. A spokesperson said that this was the result of “increased referrals to the pain management service.”

Royal Free Hospital in London reported an average waiting time of 37 weeks for its pain management service. A spokesperson for the trust said the waiting times would be shortened by offering chronic pain treatment within the community rather than in the hospital.

People who suffer from chronic pain in some cases wait more than two years for treatment to control their debilitating symptoms (stock image)

People who suffer from chronic pain in some cases wait more than two years for treatment to control their debilitating symptoms (stock image)

People who suffer from chronic pain in some cases wait more than two years for treatment to control their debilitating symptoms (stock image)

The Whittingdon Health NHS Trust, also in London, needed between 32 and 60 weeks to see patients.

Others needing more than 18 weeks included the Countess of Chester hospital in Liverpool, which lasted an average of 35 weeks, and the Mid and South Essex University Hospitals group, which lasted 27.

On the better side of the scale, patients who were treated in clinics managed by Bristol University Hospitals waited an average of six weeks.

Similarly, patients in clinics in Northampton, Nottingham and Kettering waited less than eight weeks.

Health experts said that patients could ‘dramatically’ deteriorate by the time they are treated.

Worryingly, research in 2018 has shown that more than 120,000 suicides took place in the US for 11 years, 10 percent of the deceased claiming to be constantly uncomfortable in their suicide notes or medical records.

Emma Davies, an advanced pain management pharmacist at Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board in Wales, said: “Patients can deteriorate considerably during that period.

“It is more difficult for pain relief workers to support more weakened or severely affected people and their options may be more limited.”

Antony Chuter, president of the charity Pain UK, said that more specialized services should be available in the community to make them more accessible to patients.

‘The system fails patients, it fails GPs. And pain advisers in hospitals probably have the feeling that everything is being thrown at them, “he said.

A government spokesman in Wales said the long-term solution was to wait for patients being treated outside the hospital and treating pain themselves.

The Scottish government said: ‘Living with chronic pain can be incredibly difficult and we are determined to improve the service for all those affected.

“We know that people in some parts of Scotland are waiting too long to be seen for the first time after being referred to a pain clinic.

“We will continue to collaborate with relevant NHS boards on actions they take to improve performance, supported by record investments and our reform program.”

EXERCISES FOR LOWER BACK PAIN

In the past, bed rest was advised to help a bad back, but it is now known that people who stay active are likely to recover faster, according to NHS Choices.

This can be difficult at first, but don’t be discouraged – your pain will eventually begin to improve. Consider taking painkillers if the pain makes it impossible to continue normally.

When you return to work, you can return to a normal activity pattern and distract you from the pain.

Below are exercises from physiotherapist Nick Sinfield that you can do to reduce lower back pain, including tension, stiffness and pain.

Gently get used to the movements and see how far you can go in any position without feeling pain. Try this routine at least once a day if the pain permits.

You can supplement this routine with walking, cycling and water activities.

Ask for medical advice before starting these back pain exercises and stop immediately if you feel pain.

Stretch bottom to heels

Starting position: kneel on hands and feet, with your knees under the hips and hands under the shoulders. Don’t overweight your lower back. Keep your neck long, your shoulders back and do not lock your elbows.

Action: Slowly reverse your buttocks while maintaining the natural curve in the spine. Hold the stretch for a deep breath and return to the starting position.

Repeat 8 to 10 times.

These bottom-to-heels practice stretch and mobilize the spine

These bottom to heels exert stretch and mobilize the spine

These bottom-to-heels practice stretch and mobilize the spine

Tips:

  • Do not sit on your heels if you have a knee problem
  • Ensure correct positioning with the help of a mirror
  • Stretch only to the extent that feels comfortable

Knee rolls

Starting position: Lie down on your back. Place a small flat pillow or book under your head. Keep your knees bent and together. Keep your upper body relaxed and your chin gently tucked.

Action: Roll your knees to the side, followed by your pelvis, keeping both shoulders on the floor. Hold the stretch for a deep breath and return to the starting position.

Repeat 8 to 10 times, alternately from side.

Knee rolls also work by stretching and mobilizing the spine

Knee rolls also work by stretching and mobilizing the spine

Knee rolls also work by stretching and mobilizing the spine

Tips:

  • Only move as far as it feels comfortable
  • Place a cushion between your knees for comfort

Back extensions

Starting position: Lie down on your stomach and lean on your elbows, making your spine longer. Keep your shoulders and neck long.

Action: Hold your neck long, bend your back up by pushing your hands down. You should feel a soft stretch in the abs when you bend backwards. Breathe in and hold for 5 to 10 seconds. Return to the starting position.

Repeat 8 to 10 times.

Do not bend your neck back when performing this backward extension movement

Do not bend your neck back when performing this backward extension movement

Do not bend your neck back when performing this backward extension movement

Tips:

  • Do not bend your neck back
  • Keep your hips grounded

Deep belly strengthening

Starting position: Lie down on your back. Place a small, flat pillow or book under your head. Bend your knees and keep your feet straight and hip width apart. Keep your upper body relaxed and your chin gently tucked.

Action: As you exhale, pull up the muscles of your pelvis and lower abdomen, as if you were performing an imaginary zipper along your stomach. Hold this soft woe while breathing out of your abdomen for 5 to 10 breaths and relax.

Repeat 5 times.

These exercises strengthen the deep supporting muscles around the spine

These exercises strengthen the deep supporting muscles around the spine

These exercises strengthen the deep supporting muscles around the spine

Tips:

  • This is a slow, gentle tightening of the lower abdomen. Do not pull on these muscles if you use more than 25% of your maximum strength
  • Make sure you don’t get tensed by the neck, shoulders or legs

Pelvis tilts

Starting position: Lie down on your back. Place a small, flat pillow or book under your head. Bend your knees and keep your feet straight and hip width apart. Keep your upper body relaxed and your chin gently tucked.

Action: Gently push your lower back into the floor and tighten your abs. Now tilt your pelvis to your heels until you feel a soft arch in your lower back, contract your back muscles and return to the starting position.

Repeat 10 to 15 times and tilt your pelvis back and forth in a slow rocking motion.

Pelvic tilt is recommended to stretch and strengthen the lower back

Pelvic tilt is recommended to stretch and strengthen the lower back

Pelvic tilt is recommended to stretch and strengthen the lower back

Tips:

  • Keep your deep abs working
  • Do not push through the neck, shoulders or feet

Modification: Place one hand on your stomach and the other under your lower back to feel the right muscles working.

Source: NHS Choices

.