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Ten years after the US was fascinated by the story of six-year-old Falcon Heene (center), allegedly carried away in a weather balloon, it was revealed how the child's mother, Mayumi (depicted with her) children, and husband, Richard, loved a diary of the scam

Ten years after the nation was fascinated by the story of a six-year-old boy who apparently was taken away in a weather balloon, it was revealed how the child's mother kept a diary of the scam and gave it to her lawyer to save herself & # 39; # 39; & # 39; without her husband's knowledge.

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For two difficult hours on October 15, 2009, the world watched as a silver helium balloon drifted through the Colorado air at altitudes of up to 7,000 feet – wondering if Falcon Heene could survive.

Hours after a frantic search, involving aircraft being shot and involving a National Guard helicopter, Falcon was hiding in the home of the fame-seeking family in Fort Collins, Colorado.

His parents, Richard and Mayumi were later sentenced to prison for what was declared a hoax.

Now, prior to the 10-year anniversary of the hoax, it has been revealed that Mayumi saved at least 12 pages of handwritten notes with information about the run-up to the incident, according to 5280.com.

At the time of the incident, the family's pitch for a science-based reality show was rejected.

Ten years after the US was fascinated by the story of six-year-old Falcon Heene (center), allegedly carried away in a weather balloon, it was revealed how the child's mother, Mayumi (depicted with her) children, and husband, Richard, loved a diary of the scam

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Ten years after the US was fascinated by the story of six-year-old Falcon Heene (center), allegedly carried away in a weather balloon, it was revealed how the child's mother, Mayumi (depicted with her) children, and husband, Richard, loved a diary of the scam

During two difficult hours, the whole world watched as a silver helium balloon (photo) floated through the air of Colorado at altitudes of up to 7,000 feet - wondering if the little boy could survive

During two difficult hours, the whole world watched as a silver helium balloon (photo) floated through the air of Colorado at altitudes of up to 7,000 feet - wondering if the little boy could survive

During two difficult hours, the whole world watched as a silver helium balloon (photo) floated through the air of Colorado at altitudes of up to 7,000 feet – wondering if the little boy could survive

A law enforcement officer was captured and ran to the home-made helium-filled balloon when it landed near Denver, Colorado airport on October 15, 2009.

A law enforcement officer was captured and ran to the home-made helium-filled balloon when it landed near Denver, Colorado airport on October 15, 2009.

A law enforcement officer was captured and ran to the home-made helium-filled balloon when it landed near Denver, Colorado airport on October 15, 2009.

Mayumi told the researchers that her husband wanted attention for the show and a runaway balloon with a child in it could be precise.

The & # 39; s pages of Mayumi & # 39; s journal are said to have been provided to her lawyer.

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On the first page, dated April 27, 2009, Mayumi spoke about a production company that rejected the field.

& # 39; What can we do to help them? & # 39; Mayumi wrote. & # 39; They would not raise money, but we can do our own project … Then they can have one & # 39; one-off & # 39; of it, & she added, according to 5280.com.

On September 30, Mayumi wrote: & # 39; Richard has redesigned the flying saucer many times. He started 30 feet. He called around to see if it was feedable (sic), but he thought it was expensive (sic). He also thought it would not fit in our back yard. & # 39;

Between October 1 and 2, Mayumi wrote that her husband had made a shopping list and that they had recorded the intro of the project with their children.

October 3, she wrote: & # 39; We started building a flying saucer and shooting the process indoors because it was snowing. & # 39;

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According to 5280.com, Mayumi said on one of the notes that they have a video from Falcon that says: & # 39; I want to get into it & # 39 ;.

In a note of October 14, Mayumi claims that Richard asked me to remind me of the story of "Lawnchair Larry", after which Richard said what Falcon hid and landed half an hour later, and then mention Fort Collins in (news) paper. … Falcon can hide in the closet with a safe in the basement & # 39 ;.

Hours after a frantic search, involving planes on the ground and involving a National Guard helicopter, Falcon (photo) was hidden in the family's home looking for fame in Fort Collins, Colorado

Hours after a frantic search, involving planes on the ground and involving a National Guard helicopter, Falcon (photo) was hidden in the family's home looking for fame in Fort Collins, Colorado

Hours after a frantic search, involving planes on the ground and involving a National Guard helicopter, Falcon (photo) was hidden in the family's home looking for fame in Fort Collins, Colorado

His parents, Richard and Mayumi (depicted with Falcon and his brothers) were later sentenced to prison for what was declared a hoax

His parents, Richard and Mayumi (depicted with Falcon and his brothers) were later sentenced to prison for what was declared a hoax

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His parents, Richard and Mayumi (depicted with Falcon and his brothers) were later sentenced to prison for what was declared a hoax

Richard Heene and his sons

Richard Heene and his sons

Falcon Heene

Falcon Heene

Now, prior to the 10th anniversary of the hoax, it has been revealed that Mayumi saved at least 12 pages of handwritten notes with information about the run-up to the incident. Mayumi allegedly kept the diary away from her husband in secret (left)

On October 15, the day of the incident, Mayumi wrote that she did not believe they would launch the flying saucer because of the & # 39; strong wind & # 39 ;.

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& # 39; Due to the wind, it could crash onto someone, cars & whatever … Richard said we would do the third test and stop. That's why I thought he behaved so strangely. After the flying saucer went off, it became so hysterical. Because he started so hysterically, I started to take it seriously. After it was launched, we didn't know if Falcon was in the flying saucer or in the house or anywhere, & she wrote.

Three days later, on October 18, Mayumi said she found out that when we visited our lawyer (sic), Richard revealed that he was coming to the basement to find Falcon, but that he wasn't there.

& # 39; Richard thought Falcon would really be in the flying saucer. & # 39;

According to 5280.com, once the diary was discovered and presented to the couple, Mayumi denied that it was true.

& # 39; I made up the whole story, & # 39; she told the site.

& # 39; What? & # 39; Richard asked before Mayumi explained that she had written it.

& # 39; What do you mean, you wrote this? & # 39; Said Richard, according to 5280.com. & # 39; What are you talking about? You said you didn't know what this was. Why would you write this? & # 39;

Mayumi replied: & # 39; To save myself, because of our children. & # 39;

In earlier interviews, the couple said they plead guilty after the incident because it seemed the best way to help their family. They wanted to avoid considerable imprisonment and possible deportation.

Richard was eventually sentenced to 90 days in jail, including 60 days on & # 39; work release & # 39; and Mayumi was sentenced to 20 days in jail for being served as soon as her husband was released so that they could take care of their children.

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Today, the family lives in a motorhome parked on the side of a road in New Hampton, New York. They are currently working on a home renovation project that is funded by an investor in Florida.

Bradford, 20; Ryo, 18; and Falcon, aka Balloon Boy, 16, also started a heavy metal band called de Heene Boyz.

On the band's HeeneBoyz.com website they mention their musical influences like & # 39; Iron Maiden, Black Sabbath, Dio, Metallica, to Disturbed, Linkin Park, Van Halen and the list goes on. & # 39;

Today, the family lives in a motorhome parked on the side of a road in New Hampton, New York. Their sons, Bradford, 20; Ryo, 18; and Falcon, aka Balloon Boy, 16, also started a heavy metal band called de Heene Boyz (photo)

Today, the family lives in a motorhome parked on the side of a road in New Hampton, New York. Their sons, Bradford, 20; Ryo, 18; and Falcon, aka Balloon Boy, 16, also started a heavy metal band called de Heene Boyz (photo)

Today, the family lives in a motorhome parked on the side of a road in New Hampton, New York. Their sons, Bradford, 20; Ryo, 18; and Falcon, aka Balloon Boy, 16, also started a heavy metal band called de Heene Boyz (photo)

On the band's HeeneBoyz.com website they mention their musical influences like & # 39; Iron Maiden, Black Sabbath, Dio, Metallica, to Disturbed, Linkin Park, Van Halen and the list goes on & # 39;
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On the band's HeeneBoyz.com website they mention their musical influences like & # 39; Iron Maiden, Black Sabbath, Dio, Metallica, to Disturbed, Linkin Park, Van Halen and the list goes on & # 39;

On the band's HeeneBoyz.com website they mention their musical influences like & # 39; Iron Maiden, Black Sabbath, Dio, Metallica, to Disturbed, Linkin Park, Van Halen and the list goes on & # 39;

The Heene family made the news on October 15, 2009, when a desperate emergency call was made by a distraught mother who claimed that her son was blown away in a & # 39; flying saucer & # 39 ;.

The object turned out to be from her husband, a former weatherman, who had built an experimental forecasting balloon in the family's house. It was believed that the boy had climbed in before the vessel was released and drifted.

Helicopters scrambled to follow the balloon as it blew east and television cameras watched the vessel's progress through the sky.

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Authorities even thought about shooting the 20-foot-long and five-foot-wide vessel, but in the end it landed safely in a field a few miles east of the family's house – with the boy nowhere to be found.

When Falcon came out of the family attic later that day and claimed to have hidden himself in a box, the authorities were initially relieved that he was safe.

Relief soon turned into suspicion when a family friend claimed that they had planned the hoax together as a media stunt for a reality TV show.

The accusation was further aggravated when Falcon told a CNN broadcaster that he & # 39; before the show & # 39; had hidden in the attic – a remark that moved public opinion against the family.

BALLOON BOY: HOW THE DRAMA PERFORMED

October 15, 2009:

News emerges that a six-year-old boy was driven away in an experimental helium-filled weather balloon. Richard Heene, the boy's father, had been working on the vessel – which had to fly at low altitudes – at his home in Fort Collins, Colorado when it was released and drifted.

Another son of Richard Heene said he thought he had just seen his brother Falcon climb into the balloon before he raised the fear that the little boy was floating across the Colorado sky at heights up to 7,000 feet.

Falcon & # 39; s mother Mayumi makes a frantic 911 call reporting the disappearance and rescuers hurry to find the disk-shaped vessel.

About 90 minutes later the balloon lands in a field and the boy is nowhere to be found. Initially this led to authorities fearing the worst – that the boy had dropped out en route – but it later turned out that the boy had been hiding in his parents' house all this time. He was in a box in the attic.

Falcon said to reporters outside at the time: & # 39; I played with my toys and took a nap & # 39 ;.

Richard Heene hugged the boy and added: & He says it's because I screamed at him. I'm sorry I yelled at him. & # 39;

October 15, 2009:

Richard Heene is being interviewed by Wolf Blitzer for the CN Larry King Live show. Falcon is asked why he hid in the attic and he answers: & # 39; You said we did this before the show. & # 39;

After interviewer Wolf Blitzer presses him further on the comment, Richard Heene becomes uncomfortable and complains about the & # 39; terrible & # 39; ask. He then said his son referred to media coverage after the incident.

October 2009:

911 recordings are released where little Falcon Heene & # 39; s mother Mayumi is heard begging operators to find someone to get & # 39; my son & # 39; after he drifted away on a & # 39; flying saucer & # 39 ;. Later it appears that she is referring to a silver disc-shaped weather balloon.

Richard Heene, who is crazy, then comes on the phone and explains: & # 39; We had it tied up. It shouldn't have taken off. We are testing it. I don't know if you can follow the electricity produced. It goes on for one minute every five minutes. It emits a million volts to the outer skin. & # 39;

October 20, 2009:

Richard and Mayumi Heene do a lie detector test, but the results are never published.

October 2009:

Robert Thomas, who worked with the family, said they were convinced the world would end in 2012 and wanted to build an underground bunker to protect themselves when the sun exploded.

Thomas also said that the Heene family & # 39; obsessed & # 39; was by trying to make a reality TV show and he had planned the hoax with them as a media stunt. He added that although he was aware of a hot air balloon, he did not realize that they would use their children. He was not charged.

November 2009:

Falcon Heene parents plead guilty of wasting police time in a court in Denver, Colorado, after a deal with prosecutors to prevent imprisonment and possible deportation.

December 2009:

Richard Heene, 48 at the time, was sentenced to 90 days in prison, including 60 days & # 39; work release & # 39; at Larimer County District Court after admitting he had performed the stunt to promote a reality TV show. His wife Mayumi, who was 45, is sentenced to 20 days' imprisonment to start after her husband's stint.

The couple were instructed to repay $ 42,000 for the rescue efforts of the emergency services. This included $ 8,500 for damage to the field where the vessel landed.

Richard Heene said to the court: & # 39; I want to repeat that I am very sorry. & # 39;

The judge forbade them from taking advantage of the hoax for four years. He argued that the couple had not acted on behalf of TV companies, but that they had devised it all themselves, not necessarily just to get a TV program, but at least to get their name back. and maybe hoping that someone would pick them up & # 39 ;.

& # 39; Before that, & # 39; he said, & # 39; should they be punished? & # 39;

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