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How millions of Australians won’t get cheaper energy in light of a $1.5 billion energy crisis relief package

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How millions of Australians won’t get cheaper energy amid a $1.5 billion energy crisis relief package – here’s who they’ll miss out on

  • Premier Anthony Albanese said the electricity bill relief plan will target the hardest-hit states
  • Legislation providing $1.5 billion to businesses and homes was voted on this week
  • Albanese said the money would go to countries in the national energy market
  • He said some states, including Western Australia, have not been severely affected by the energy crisis

Prime Minister Anthony Albanese said the $1.5 billion package to ease the electricity bill will be directed at the countries hardest hit by the energy crisis.

The federal government last week agreed with states on a plan that would cap coal and gas prices for a year, and also provide $1.5 billion in relief for small businesses and households — mainly those receiving Commonwealth payments.

The legislation will be presented to parliament on Thursday after being called in light of the decision.

Albanese says the money will go towards the states that are part of the national energy market and are hardest hit, namely southeast Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia.

In what could suggest that Western Australia, Tasmania, the ACT and the Northern Territory could miss out on a large share of the financing pie, Albanese said they were “not affected by exposure to the global crisis”.

The government’s $1.5 billion package to reduce electricity bills will be directed at countries in the national energy market hit hardest by the energy crisis.

Prime Minister Anthony Albanese (pictured with girlfriend Judy Haydon) said some states, including Western Australia, have not been hit as hard by rising energy prices that have affected the rest of Australia.

Prime Minister Anthony Albanese (pictured with girlfriend Judy Haydon) said some states, including Western Australia, have not been hit as hard by rising energy prices that have affected the rest of Australia.

“States like WA are doing much better because they have the gas hold policy that they introduced all those years ago, and it’s proven to be quite a wise policy because … it’s not affected by exposure,” he told ABC Radio Brisbane.

On Monday, Western Australia’s premier, Mark McGowan, said that while the state would avoid an estimated 56 per cent rise in energy bills, pensioners and other welfare recipients would get a cut from the rebate package.

“It’s a good result because we get some benefits without the problems (other countries face),” he said.

I wouldn’t object that it might be on a different scale between us and a country that gets a 50 percent energy boost next year when we have 2.5 percent.

“If we can participate and the people most in need can benefit from it, we will.”

1680494943 938 How millions of Australians wont get cheaper energy in light

But WW Premier Mark McGowan said this week his constituents would get part of the plan

Albanese said the government would consider reversing the gas reservation agreement at the national level, but for now, interim measures are crucial.

“We’re dealing with … both of these issues in the long term like how do we have less exposure to global energy markets by having more flexibility and increasing supply … but in the short term, you can’t solve supply problems right away,” he said.

The government is working to persuade the Greens to pass the legislation through the Senate, and while the small party says they are eager to ease the burden on families and businesses, they don’t want to offset the “greedy” coal and gas giants, again proposing an unexpected tax.

Energy prices are expected to rise by 56 percent, prompting the government to implement temporary restrictions on coal and gas prices

Energy prices are expected to rise by 56 percent, prompting the government to implement temporary restrictions on coal and gas prices

The coalition has indicated that it will not support the bill.

“I find it remarkable that Peter Dutton or someone else would say ‘Yeah, we’d be happy to sit back and just let energy prices go up,’” Albanese said.

“We need to act to protect businesses and protect families, and I am confident Parliament will see that they have a responsibility to act.”

Earlier, Mr Dutton was asked over the ABC why the coalition was “standing in the way” of the government’s plan to reduce electricity bills by $230.

Dutton said the government went to the election promising “97 times” to cut electricity rates by $275.

“They had five months to work out between the election and the October budget on how to deliver on that promise,” Dutton said.

“$230 is an estimated value, but it’s not based on a definitive plan.”

Dutton said the government could “easily” bring in more gas, which would solve the energy crisis.

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