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More is more! The sixties were a time of experimentation when it came to coloring colors. This room shows how the unusual combination of purple, red and orange was brought together

From the dazzling colors of the swinging sixties to our current obsession with muted grays, this lively photo series shows how many living rooms have changed in the last six decades.

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The Italian design duo Stefano Mich and Alessandro de Pompeis offered their expert view of the most important interior trends that have been decisive in Europe every decade – including the pastel madness of minimalism of the 1980s and 1990s.

The analysis, conducted with Sony to celebrate its latest XG95 TV model, reveals how the rise of smaller homes means that people today often want a multifunctional living room that makes it possible to eat, relax and entertain in a single room.

1960

More is more! The sixties were a time of experimentation when it came to coloring colors. This room shows how the unusual combination of purple, red and orange was brought together

More is more! The sixties were a time of experimentation when it came to coloring colors. This room shows how the unusual combination of purple, red and orange was brought together

Stefano and Alessandro said: & # 39; This decade was a time of experimentation throughout Europe – even in the living room.

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& # 39; The color palettes were often inspired by nature; greens, floral patterns and gold were stuck to everything from benches to walls.

& # 39; By the end of this decade, the psychedelic style had to put crazy colors together, for example, a deep pink sofa covered with bright orange cushions.

& # 39; Central heating meant that the fireplace, a typical architectural feature in the UK and in most Northern European countries, was not necessarily the focus of the room; its place was taken by television and with most of the houses that owned one by the end of the sixties, it became the vital piece of furniture in the house. & # 39;

1970

Feel fruity! Orange, avocado and lemon yellow were all popular heaps of colors for the 1970s, as shown above. There was also a trend to have couches and chairs in a mix of materials

Feel fruity! Orange, avocado and lemon yellow were all popular heaps of colors for the 1970s, as shown above. There was also a trend to have couches and chairs in a mix of materials

Feel fruity! Orange, avocado and lemon yellow were all popular heaps of colors for the 1970s, as shown above. There was also a trend to have couches and chairs in a mix of materials

Stefano and Alessandro said: From the 1970s it was fashionable to have chairs and sofas in an eclectic combination of styles and colors, although in more traditional houses the three-part suite remained a dominant feature in the living room.

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& # 39; New materials for furniture, such as glass, aluminum and plastic, became increasingly popular.

& # 39; Orange and avocado-green colors were important features throughout Europe, as were tulip chairs, their clones, and fluffy rugs.

& # 39; Televisions and hi-fi systems became iconic design masterpieces to show off.

& # 39; In most living rooms, solitary furniture was replaced by more modern and modular storage systems that consisted of shelves, space for TV, cabinets, drawers and pull-down cocktail units. & # 39;

1980

Pastel perfection: muted shades of pink and blue were common in homes in Europe in the 1980s. Heavy wooden furniture also made a comeback and televisions became a larger fixture
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Pastel perfection: muted shades of pink and blue were common in homes in Europe in the 1980s. Heavy wooden furniture also made a comeback and televisions became a larger fixture

Pastel perfection: muted shades of pink and blue were common in homes in Europe in the 1980s. Heavy wooden furniture also made a comeback and televisions became a larger fixture

Stefano and Alessandro said: & # 39; By the 1980s, heavy wooden furniture was back and dusty pastels were huge, just like floral patterns. Every sofa, pillow and carpet in the living rooms in Europe was a sea of ​​& # 39; dim & # 39; or & # 39; whitish & # 39 ;.

& # 39; On the other hand, there was another big trend inspired by postmodernism with brash and bold colors and patterns known as Memphis-style by the Italian designer Ettore Sottsass who founded a group of artists and designers named Memphis in 1981.

& # 39; In this decade, televisions became more important because they were used as screens for the new game consoles and for viewing VHS tapes. The new use of the TV had a major impact on the design of the living room.

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& # 39; TV couches became larger to fit and store all new media and their accessories and it was very common to find in the living room, cupboards, bookcases and shelves full of piles of VHS tapes and video games. & # 39;

1990

Mating back: after the boom of the 1980s, the 1990s had everything to do with minimalism, about fashion, art and interior design. On the photo, a room filled with typical white and beige furniture

Mating back: after the boom of the 1980s, the 1990s had everything to do with minimalism, about fashion, art and interior design. On the photo, a room filled with typical white and beige furniture

Mating back: after the boom of the 1980s, the 1990s had everything to do with minimalism, about fashion, art and interior design. On the photo, a room filled with typical white and beige furniture

Stefano and Alessandro said: & # 39; The 1990s restored a sense of minimalism after the 80s – the interiors were designed to be clean and less crowded than in the previous decade.

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& # 39; Interestingly enough, the UK was familiar with a momentary trend of inflatable and neon colored furniture.

& # 39; However, over the rest of Europe, white or beige furniture was trendy and considered cool. Ivy patterns on the wall and fake silk flowers were two small details that were also major trends. & # 39;

2000s

DIY design: the culture of flat suits became a bit standard in this decade, creating the desire for affordable, easy to assemble furniture kits

DIY design: the culture of flat suits became a bit standard in this decade, creating the desire for affordable, easy to assemble furniture kits

DIY design: the culture of flat suits became a bit standard in this decade, creating the desire for affordable, easy to assemble furniture kits

Stefano and Alessandro said: & # 39; During the transition to the 2000s, minimalism gradually began to take hold as statements became clearer and more loud.

& # 39; Feature walls with floral and designer prints were popular. The continuous advancement of technology spread the use of the internet and its integration into the home, along with the computer, televisions were no longer large bulky boxes but large flat screens to create the home theater with wired speaker systems.

& # 39; The culture of flat suits became a bit standard in this decade, harnessing the desire for affordable, easy to assemble furniture.

& # 39; After the 90s, people tried to communicate their character through their decor, through their photos & frames on the walls and a more extensive use of colors and backgrounds. & # 39;

TODAY

Attention to detail: copper and copper finishes and accent colors in green and light pink are added to neutral gray color palettes in rooms such as the ones above. On the photo, the Sony XG95 TV
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Attention to detail: copper and copper finishes and accent colors in green and light pink are added to neutral gray color palettes in rooms such as the ones above. On the photo, the Sony XG95 TV

Attention to detail: copper and copper finishes and accent colors in green and light pink are added to neutral gray color palettes in rooms such as the ones above. On the photo, the Sony XG95 TV

Stefano and Alessandro said: & # 39; In recent years a phenomenon with the name & # 39; has occurred in many European countries. Urban living & # 39 ;. There is a tendency to return to life in the center of the major capitals where houses become more expensive and the spaces become smaller.

& # 39; Therefore, the need to transform the living room into a multifunctional space is even greater.

& # 39; In terms of design, & # 39; feeling at home & # 39; nowadays a real need, people want to live in a space with an atmosphere that is the unique expression of their identity. This allows different trends to co-exist, from a contemporary minimalist atmosphere to a more personal and maximalist space.

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& # 39; Bringing in the exterior is another big trend in interior design that affects everything in the living room, from ornaments to wallpaper.

& # 39; Copper and copper finishes are also a big trend. Velvet is back and blue has become increasingly popular in the many different shades along with green and light pink. & # 39;

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