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The popular carbonated drink has taken Australia by storm, but drivers have to be careful because some bottles have an alcohol content of 1.15 percent

REVEALED: How KOMBUCHA drinking could get drivers over the limit

  • Kombucha is a fermented beverage, but some contain 1.15 percent alcohol levels
  • Drinking kombucha can bring some drivers over the limit if they are inhaled
  • P-plates that do not need alcohol in the system can exceed the limit
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Motorists are warned to stay away from kombucha for fear that it will push them over the limit.

The popular carbonated drink has taken Australia by storm, but drivers have to be careful because some bottles have an alcohol content of 1.15 percent.

Kombucha enthusiasts on their full driving license should drink a significant portion of the drink to convert them, but P-platers can pay a fine for drinking just one bottle before they start driving.

The popular carbonated drink has taken Australia by storm, but drivers have to be careful because some bottles have an alcohol content of 1.15 percent

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The popular carbonated drink has taken Australia by storm, but drivers have to be careful because some bottles have an alcohol content of 1.15 percent

Kombucha and other beverages such as kefer are made by fermentation, which produces alcohol.

Some bottles only contain 0.5 percent alcohol, but others can contain a much higher percentage.

One brand of the beverage, Buchi Kombucha, even had a national recall in 2015 because some bottles were considered intoxicating, with up to 3 percent alcohol.

Will Dustin, the general director of Breathalysers New Zealand told stuff those who drank kombucha could see the results popping up during a breath test.

& # 39; If you blow into a blower quickly while it is still in the mouth and throat area, it will register, & # 39; said Mr. Dustin.

But he said the alcohol at a level as low as 1 percent would probably be absorbed by the body in just 20 minutes.

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A range of other unusual products contain alcohol levels that can cause drivers to end up in hot water.

Cherry Ripes, toothpaste, Strepsils and even some antibiotics all contain alcohol.

P-planners who are caught driving even with the smallest percentage of alcohol can inadvertently expect a fine (file image)

P-planners who are caught driving even with the smallest percentage of alcohol can inadvertently expect a fine (file image)

P-planners who are caught driving even with the smallest percentage of alcohol can inadvertently expect a fine (file image)

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