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Data from Choice analysts showed that many portable baby cots, prams and cots did not meet their standard safety tests (photo)

HUNDREDS of baby products endanger baby's life – no less than 98 percent of portable baby cots do not pass safety tests

  • Selection data has shown that hundreds of items are unsafe for children and families
  • 98% of the portable baby cots and 83% of the prams did not pass their safety test
  • CEO Alan Kirkland called for government legislation on product safety laws
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Hundreds of baby cots and prams are unsafe and can endanger the lives of babies, according to a shocking report.

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Consumer group Choice has called for legislation to make it illegal to sell unsafe products after hundreds of baby products have failed the standard safety tests.

Choice data showed that 98 percent of baby cots tested from 2011 to 2018 failed their safety tests, along with 83 percent of strollers tested between 2012 and 2019.

Also, 59 percent of the tested baby cots from 2012 to 2019 also failed safety tests, causing Choice CEO Alan Kirkland to call for government intervention.

Data from Choice analysts showed that many portable baby cots, prams and cots did not meet their standard safety tests (photo)

Data from Choice analysts showed that many portable baby cots, prams and cots did not meet their standard safety tests (photo)

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& # 39; The Australian government should make it illegal to sell unsafe products & # 39 ;, Kirkland said.

& # 39; New security laws would impose heavy fines on companies for flooding the Australian market with unsafe junk. & # 39;

The group also wants to set stricter conditions for items with batteries, after data has shown that 20 children are admitted to hospital every week after admission.

& # 39; We need stronger laws to mitigate the risks associated with unsecured button batteries and other products that we already know are unsafe but are still being sold, & # 39; Mr. Kirkland added.

Ten of the 17 household household tested, battery-powered household items were considered dangerous, with Mr. Kirkland convinced that companies should be forced to ensure that their products are safe before they become available to consumers.

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"Companies must be required by law to take reasonable steps to ensure that the products they sell are safe," said Kirkland.

& # 39; It's really that simple. Without this reform, people remain injured and even killed by dangerous products such as coin-operated batteries. & # 39;

& # 39; It is essential that Parliament takes this problem seriously and prescribes a solution. & # 39;

Children are prone to high risk of items with small parts, including batteries (stock image)

Children are prone to high risk of items with small parts, including batteries (stock image)

Children are prone to high risk of items with small parts, including batteries (stock image)

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