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Baljit Singh (photo), 37, came to Melbourne from India in 1999

How an extended $ 2MILLION & # 39; ghost lecture & # 39; was undone after the businessman telephoned in the middle of the racket for four minutes

  • Baljit Singh, 37, came to Melbourne from Melbourne in 1999 as an 18-year-old
  • He started a successful logistics company, but soon turned his talents into crime
  • He led two training schools but claimed that they had more students than they did
  • This enabled him to claim fraudulent $ 2 million in state grants for a year
  • His scam was undone when the police pulled a phone call he had with his colleague
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A businessman who has stolen $ 2 million from taxpayers in an extensive & # 39; ghost lecture & # 39; was caught red-handed after federal agents tapped his phone.

Baljit Singh, 37, came from Melbourne to Melbourne in 1999 as a smart and ambitious 18-year-old.

He founded a logistics company that earned $ 17.5 million in 2011 – but in an effort to increase his fortune, he turned his talents into crime.

Baljit Singh (photo), 37, came to Melbourne from India in 1999

He and his friend, friend Mukesh Sharma (photo), owned and conducted two vocational courses in St. Stephen and Footscray
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He and his friend, friend Mukesh Sharma (photo), owned and conducted two vocational courses in St. Stephen and Footscray

Singh (left) and friend Mukesh Sharma (right), owned and led two vocational courses in St. Stephen and Footscray

Singh, his brother-in-law Rakesh Kumar and his friend Mukesh Sharma, had two vocational training colleges in St. Stephen and Footscray.

The colleges were really with classrooms and staff – but the men pretended to have much more students than they did.

This allowed them to claim huge government grants, designed to help schools train students in certain courses.

The fraudsters have stolen the identity of people and mentioned them as students without their knowledge.

They also volunteered to pay for foreign students, but gave them certificates to say that they had attended courses without even having to appear.

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The scam allowed the trio, who were all imprisoned last year, to collect $ 2,007,487 in tax money between March 2014 and July 2015 – but then their plot collapsed.

The police took the Ferrari away from Singh (photo) when he was arrested for the huge fraud

The police took the Ferrari away from Singh (photo) when he was arrested for the huge fraud

The police took the Ferrari away from Singh (photo) when he was arrested for the huge fraud

The scam allowed Singh to live in a lavish mansion and drive a Ferrari (both pictured after his arrest)

The scam allowed Singh to live in a lavish mansion and drive a Ferrari (both pictured after his arrest)

The scam allowed Singh to live in a lavish mansion and drive a Ferrari (both pictured after his arrest)

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After receiving a tip, the Australian Federal Police discovered that the two Singh colleges were suspiciously silent because they supposedly enrolled 350 students.

Unable to trace the source of his wealth, allowing him to live in a lavish mansion and drive a red Ferrari, commanded officers to tap his phone.

Shortly thereafter, Singh received a call from the Australian Skills Quality Authority saying that his company would be audited.

He then called Sharma to tell him to prepare, and their four-minute conversation – as well as other chats with employees – was recorded by the police.

According to the ABC 7.30, who revealed the bugged phone calls on Tuesday, one of Singh & # 39; s associates told him: & # 39; We know that we are acting ethically and legally wrong. & # 39;

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Officers then went to college – and discovered that the men had set them up to make them look real.

& # 39; What we saw … was that a lot of computers and paperwork came into the actual institution & # 39 ;, Detective Woodward told ABC.

& # 39; But then the computers had no network, they were not connected to anything. So they actually brought in all this material to meet the compliance visit. & # 39;

In an attempt to make the lectures appear legitimate, the men had even printed fake records and assignments that, according to them, the students had completed. But the police discovered that many of them were exactly the same - even to the same spelling mistakes (pictured with chief spelled as & # 39; chief & # 39;)

In an attempt to make the lectures appear legitimate, the men had even printed fake records and assignments that, according to them, the students had completed. But the police discovered that many of them were exactly the same - even to the same spelling mistakes (pictured with chief spelled as & # 39; chief & # 39;)

In an attempt to make the lectures appear legitimate, the men had even printed fake records and assignments that, according to them, the students had completed. But the police discovered that many of them were exactly the same – even to the same spelling mistakes (pictured with chief spelled as & # 39; chief & # 39;)

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In an attempt to make the lectures appear legitimate, the men had even printed fake records and assignments that, according to them, the students had completed.

But the police discovered that many of them were exactly the same – even because of the same spelling mistakes.

& # 39; What we found were two vocational training systems that had incredibly meticulous records for students who did not exist fundamentally, & # 39; said detective inspector Woodward.

The men were arrested and charged with conspiracy to unfairly influence a government official and conspiracy to handle the proceeds of crime.

They were found guilty in September last year. Singh was imprisoned for six years, while Kumar and Sharma were imprisoned for five years.

Singh & # 39; s wife, Rekha Aurora, was found guilty of the same charges, but only got good behavior for three years because she wasn't involved in that much.

Another woman was acquitted.

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