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How a new coronavirus cluster threatens Melbourne’s path out of lockdown

The success of Melbourne’s continued lockdown could be jeopardized with a new cluster in the south east of the city testing the capacity of COVID detectives.

There are currently 101 active coronavirus cases in the Casey and Dandenong area with 34 infections related to five households in the Afghan community.

Because residents of the city are still under strict Phase 4 lockdown, which restricts families who travel more than 3 miles from their home to visit other households, the infected group is thought to have violated the home custody warrants.

Health authorities are now struggling to track down and trace the new surge in cases and the Victorian government has even begun a new recruitment drive that will re-recruit retired officers to bolster the state’s first-line virus efforts.

There are currently 101 active coronavirus cases in the Casey and Dandenong area with 34 infections associated with five households

There are currently 101 active coronavirus cases in the Casey and Dandenong area with 34 infections associated with five households

The Victorian government has even begun a new recruitment drive that will re-recruit retired officers to bolster the state's first-line virus efforts.

The Victorian government has even begun a new recruitment drive that will re-recruit retired officers to bolster the state's first-line virus efforts.

The Victorian government has even begun a new recruitment drive that will re-recruit retired officers to bolster the state’s first-line virus efforts.

“Members of those households who visit other households,” said COVID-19 testing commander Jeroen Weimar of the Department of Health and Human Services.

‘Precisely that limited contact, relatively little contact between these five households has now resulted in the fact that we have 34 people in five houses who experience or live with a very real threat from the coronavirus.’

The cluster, which hit the five households in Hallam, Clyde, Narre Warren South and Cranbourne North, first emerged on September 4.

Cases in the southeast have now spread to Dandenong Police Station and a number of industrial workshops.

Prime Minister Daniel Andrews said on Friday that the actions of the family involved in the cluster are “disappointing.”

The cluster that hit the five households in Hallam, Clyde, Narre Warren South and Cranbourne North first emerged on September 4

The cluster that hit the five households in Hallam, Clyde, Narre Warren South and Cranbourne North first emerged on September 4

The cluster that hit the five households in Hallam, Clyde, Narre Warren South and Cranbourne North first emerged on September 4

“Five kilometers is one thing and visiting others is the real problem here.” he said.

‘The rules are there for a reason and whoever undermines this undermines the whole strategy and it means that the rules apply longer.’

But the Victorian leader ruled out fines for the group, telling reporters that this could discourage others from being completely honest with contact investigators.

“I know a lot of Victorians, when you see examples of people breaking the rules, it is disappointing, it makes you angry,” Mr Andrews said.

‘You have to look at the bigger picture here.

‘We don’t want a situation where people don’t feel confident and indeed, you know, the feeling that they have an obligation to tell us the full story ASAP. We need that. ‘

The success of Melbourne's continued lockdown could be jeopardized with a new cluster in the south east of the city. Pictured: A coronavirus testing center in Cranbourne on Sept. 17

The success of Melbourne's continued lockdown could be jeopardized with a new cluster in the south east of the city. Pictured: A coronavirus testing center in Cranbourne on Sept. 17

The success of Melbourne’s continued lockdown could be jeopardized with a new cluster in the south east of the city. Pictured: A coronavirus testing center in Cranbourne on Sept. 17

The Casey and Dandenong cluster is testing the capacity of COVID detectives. Pictured: Heathworkers are seen at a coronavirus testing center in Cranbourne on Sept. 17

The Casey and Dandenong cluster is testing the capacity of COVID detectives. Pictured: Heathworkers are seen at a coronavirus testing center in Cranbourne on Sept. 17

The Casey and Dandenong cluster is testing the capacity of COVID detectives. Pictured: Heathworkers are seen at a coronavirus testing center in Cranbourne on Sept. 17

A health worker is pictured approaching a vehicle at a COVID-19 testing center in Cranbourne on September 17

A health worker is pictured approaching a vehicle at a COVID-19 testing center in Cranbourne on September 17

A health worker is pictured approaching a vehicle at a COVID-19 testing center in Cranbourne on September 17

Despite the new cluster, the total number of Victoria cases continues to decline.

On Friday there were 45 new cases, bringing the total number of infections above 20,000.

However, the number of active cases has dropped to 920.

Unfortunately, another five deaths today bring Victoria’s death toll to 750.

With contact investigators working “ painstakingly ” around the clock to slow the spread of the virus and get the town out of the lock, the Victorian government is poised to introduce a controversial new policy that will get retired agents back into the force. be included.

The Department of Justice and Community Safety and the Department of Health and Human Services are behind the push that ensures former agents receive paid training before being assigned specific COVID-19 roles, including industry enforcement, test support, door knocking and the airport patrol.

A heavy police presence can be seen in Dandenong after an anti-lockdown protest on August 28

A heavy police presence can be seen in Dandenong after an anti-lockdown protest on August 28

A heavy police presence can be seen in Dandenong after an anti-lockdown protest on August 28

A man with a dog is questioned by two police officers in the Dandenong area

A man with a dog is questioned by two police officers in the Dandenong area

A man with a dog is questioned by two police officers in the Dandenong area

But not everyone is in favor of bringing back veteran police.

“ Police veterans can make a significant contribution to the continued safety of the community, but using them to commit offenses, detain people and check private property is completely inappropriate, ” said David Southwick, Opposition Police spokesman & Community Safety. Herald Sun.

Ivan Ray, who has served in the Victorian police for more than three decades, said it is a recipe for disaster for the veterans.

“It’s basically a health department police force, and we know the health department isn’t good at enforcement, we’ve seen that in the hotel’s quarantine operations,” Mr. Ray said.

“Veterans can play a role and they can support the police, but it has to be the police,” he said.

Health authorities are urging everyone in southeast Melbourne to monitor their health closely and get tested immediately if they feel unwell.

Health authorities urge everyone in southeast Melbourne to monitor their health closely and get tested immediately if they feel unwell

Health authorities urge everyone in southeast Melbourne to monitor their health closely and get tested immediately if they feel unwell

Health authorities urge everyone in southeast Melbourne to monitor their health closely and get tested immediately if they feel unwell

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