How a house from the 1950s in Forber, the suburb of Canberra, won a prize for the Architecture prize

A modest 1950s brick bungalow has been transformed into an architecturally renowned, award-winning home with a contemporary twist.

Before it was expanded with two state-of-the-art pavilions, the original three-bedroom brick house resembled some of the other, modest residences in the chic Forrest suburb of Canberra, a short walk from the parliament building and nearby embassies.

The owners of this house on Empire Circuit, built in 1951, wanted an addition that has preserved Australia's architectural heritage.

A modest 1950s brick bungalow has been transformed into an architecturally renowned, award-winning home with a contemporary twist

A modest 1950s brick bungalow has been transformed into an architecturally renowned, award-winning home with a contemporary twist

Before it was expanded with two state-of-the-art pavilions, this house resembled some of the other, modest residences in the chic Forrest district of Canberra, a short walk from the parliament building and embassy quarters.

Before it was expanded with two state-of-the-art pavilions, this house resembled some of the other, modest residences in the chic Forrest district of Canberra, a short walk from the parliament building and embassy quarters.

Before it was expanded with two state-of-the-art pavilions, this house resembled some of the other, modest residences in the chic Forrest district of Canberra, a short walk from the parliament building and embassy quarters.

They asked for a & # 39; long-term family home that catches the sun & # 39; in this tree-lined street where cabinet staff, members of parliament, diplomats and senior officials often take a morning walk.

To realize their vision, the Melbourne company Austin Maynard Architects designed two new pavilions – connected by glass walkways – on the side and rear of the L-shaped post-war house.

The extensions, completed in January, include a new kitchen and dining room, clad inside with hardwood and a new contemporary bedroom, with a floor-to-ceiling glass window overlooking the back garden.

The additions to the extended four-bedroom Empire House received the Canberra medallion on Saturday night, the most prestigious architecture prize at the Australian Capital Territory Architecture Awards.

Judge Sarah Truscott, of the Australian Institute of Architects, praised the extension for preserving the original character of the 68-year-old bungalow, in an area of ​​southern Canberra, designed by American architect Walter Burley Griffin from the early twentieth century.

& # 39; The architects have shown respect for the Canberra heritage built up by retaining the best of the house and creating smart additional living spaces for all seasons, & # 39; she said.

The owners of this house on Empire Circuit, built in 1951, wanted to preserve Australia's architectural heritage. To realize their vision, the Melbourne company Austin Maynard Architects designed two new pavilions on either side of the L-shaped post-war house, connected by glass walkways

The owners of this house on Empire Circuit, built in 1951, wanted to preserve Australia's architectural heritage. To realize their vision, the Melbourne company Austin Maynard Architects designed two new pavilions on either side of the L-shaped post-war house, connected by glass walkways

The owners of this house on Empire Circuit, built in 1951, wanted to preserve Australia's architectural heritage. To realize their vision, the Melbourne company Austin Maynard Architects designed two new pavilions on either side of the L-shaped post-war house, connected by glass walkways

The extensions, completed in January, include a new living room with hardwood lining inside and a new modern bedroom, with a floor-to-ceiling glass window overlooking the back garden.

The extensions, completed in January, include a new living room with hardwood lining inside and a new modern bedroom, with a floor-to-ceiling glass window overlooking the back garden.

The extensions, completed in January, include a new living room with hardwood lining inside and a new modern bedroom, with a floor-to-ceiling glass window overlooking the back garden.

The well-traveled, professional owners of the house described themselves as Austin Maynard Architects as people with progressive political values.

& # 39; Just like us, they are & # 39; links & # 39;, & # 39; said the firm, based in Fitzroy in Melbourne & # 39; s in-north on their website.

One of the owners, Lindy who refused to have her surname published, told them that the result exceeded her expectations of a & # 39; long-term family home that catches the sun & # 39 ;.

& # 39; Our new living space improves our well-being above everything we imagined, & # 39; she said.

The architects also wanted to take a stand against the move to demolish old houses and replace them with larger buildings with a lack of character.

& # 39; Our attached and natural heritage is at risk of being swallowed in the urge to redevelop all facets of our community & # 39 ;, they said.

& # 39; Contrary to the current Australian trend – to build large, fast and cheap, Empire Canberra is a relatively small, handmade house. & # 39;

The contemporary additions to the Empire House were awarded the Canberra Medallion on Saturday night, the most prestigious architecture prize at the Australian Capital Territory Architecture Awards

The contemporary additions to the Empire House were awarded the Canberra Medallion on Saturday night, the most prestigious architecture prize at the Australian Capital Territory Architecture Awards

The contemporary additions to the Empire House were awarded the Canberra Medallion on Saturday night, the most prestigious architecture prize at the Australian Capital Territory Architecture Awards

Judge Sarah Truscott, of the Australian Institute of Architects, praised the extension for preserving the original character of the 68-year-old bungalow in an area of ​​southern Canberra, designed by American architect Walter Burley Griffin from the early twentieth century

Judge Sarah Truscott, of the Australian Institute of Architects, praised the extension for preserving the original character of the 68-year-old bungalow in an area of ​​southern Canberra, designed by American architect Walter Burley Griffin from the early twentieth century

Judge Sarah Truscott, of the Australian Institute of Architects, praised the extension for preserving the original character of the 68-year-old bungalow in an area of ​​southern Canberra, designed by American architect Walter Burley Griffin from the early twentieth century

Architect Ray Dinh's goal was to preserve the footprint of the original house and to design an extension that the & # 39; culturally important & # 39; street in Canberra's center of political and diplomatic power, known as the & # 39; clothing circle & # 39 ;, complements.

& # 39; Empire is on a beautiful, wide, tree-lined street, in a culturally important and important part of the capital. It is architecturally special and craftsmanship because it deserved the area, "according to his architectural firm.

Despite the expansion, the size of the house remains modest at 233 square meters on a block of 941 square meters.

The owners had previously ordered Enrico Taglietti, a highly acclaimed architect, who was born in Italy, to design the Styx Valley Protest Shelter, northwest of Hobart, to pay tribute to environmentalists.

The exterior covering of the contemporary extension is also a tribute to the Sydney Opera House, with white rectangles inspired by the tiles on the famous harbor building.

The wooden interior of the new living room is also reminiscent of the famous concert hall of the late Deen, Jorn Utzon.

Architect Ray Dinh wanted to preserve the footprint of the original house and design an extension that the & # 39; culturally important & # 39; street in Canberra & # 39; s center of political and diplomatic power, known as the & # 39; clothing circle & # 39 ;.

Architect Ray Dinh wanted to preserve the footprint of the original house and design an extension that the & # 39; culturally important & # 39; street in Canberra & # 39; s center of political and diplomatic power, known as the & # 39; clothing circle & # 39 ;.

Architect Ray Dinh wanted to preserve the footprint of the original house and design an extension that the & # 39; culturally important & # 39; street in Canberra & # 39; s center of political and diplomatic power, known as the & # 39; clothing circle & # 39 ;.

The exterior covering of the contemporary extension is also a tribute to the Sydney Opera House, with white rectangles that seem inspired by the tiles on the famous harbor building

The exterior covering of the contemporary extension is also a tribute to the Sydney Opera House, with white rectangles that seem inspired by the tiles on the famous harbor building

The exterior covering of the contemporary extension is also a tribute to the Sydney Opera House, with white rectangles that seem inspired by the tiles on the famous harbor building

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