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House intelligence committee speaks about new DNA bio-weapons that can target a single person 

‘You can take someone’s DNA and design a weapon that can kill them’: House Intelligence Committee member reveals new bioweapons can be programmed with health data to target one person

  • US Representative Jason Crow warned that bioweapons are being made that use a target’s DNA to kill that person alone during the Aspen Security Forum on Friday
  • The congressman said the development of the weapons was worrisome given the popularity of DNA testing services such as 23andMe
  • 23andMe has stated that it does not sell customers’ personal information, but the company is one of several that have provided information to the police
  • In 2019, several Russian and Chinese labs were found to be processing DNA tests for Americans through Medicare and Medicaid
  • Officials warned the bioweapons could also target animals and disrupt food supplies around the world

A member of the US House Intelligence Committee warned that bioweapons are being created that use a target’s DNA to kill just that person.

Speaking at the Aspen Security Forum on Friday, U.S. Representative Jason Crow of Colorado warned Americans not to be so arrogant about sharing their DNA with private companies due to the arrival of the new type of weapon.

“You can really take someone’s DNA, you know, take their medical profile and you can target a biological weapon that will kill that person or take them off the battlefield or render them useless,” Crow said.

The congressman said the development of the weapons was worrisome given the popularity of DNA testing services, where people like to share their genetic maps with companies to gain insight into their genealogy and health.

“People will spit in a cup very quickly and send it to 23andMe and get really interesting data about their background,” Crow said, “and guess what? Their DNA is now owned by a private company.”

“We need to have an open and public discussion about… what the protection of healthcare information, DNA information and your data looks like, because that data is actually obtained and collected by our adversaries for the development of these systems. ‘

US Representative Jason Crow of Colorado warned that bioweapons are being made that use a target's DNA to kill that person alone during the Aspen Security Forum on Friday

US Representative Jason Crow of Colorado warned that bioweapons are being made that use a target’s DNA to kill that person alone during the Aspen Security Forum on Friday

The congressman said the development of the weapons was worrisome given the popularity of DNA testing services such as 23andMe

The congressman said the development of the weapons was worrisome given the popularity of DNA testing services such as 23andMe

23andMe has repeatedly stated that it does not sell private customer information, but the DNA company is one of many that have provided information to the police upon request

23andMe has repeatedly stated that it does not sell private customer information, but the DNA company is one of many that have provided information to the police upon request

23andMe has repeatedly stated that it does not sell private customer information, but the DNA company is one of several that have provided information to the police upon request.

Last year, US Senator Marco Rubio sounded the alarm that Russian and Chinese labs were processing Americans’ DNA tests through Medicare and Medicaid.

“It’s ridiculous that our current policies allow the Chinese Communist Party to access Americans’ genomic data,” Rubio said in a statement.

“There is absolutely no reason that Beijing, which routinely tries to undermine US national security, should get the genomic data of US citizens.

US Senator Joni Ernst of Iowa, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said US rivals could use such DNA bioweapons to attack food supplies on a massive scale.

Ernst warned that biological weapons could be used to attack specific animals on which civilians, troops or cities depend, creating scarcity and food insecurity to weaken humans.

“Food insecurity creates many other uncertainties around the world,” says Ernst.

“There are a number of ways we can look at biological weapons and the need to make sure that we are not only protecting humans, but also the food that will keep us alive.”

US Senator Joni Ernst, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said US rivals could use such DNA bioweapons to attack food supplies on a large scale.

US Senator Joni Ernst, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said US rivals could use such DNA bioweapons to attack food supplies on a large scale.

In 2018, Ancestry, 23andMe, Habit, Helix, and MyHeritage signed on to the policy prepared with the help of The Future of Privacy Forum, a non-profit organization, to support “promoting responsible data practices in support of emerging technologies.” according to Gizmodo.

The guidelines, titled Privacy Best Practices for Consumer Genetic Testing Services and released Tuesday address scenarios where users’ personally identifiable and anonymous genetic information could be shared with law enforcement (without a warrant) and other third parties.

The new voluntary policy calls for separate consent from users before sharing “individual-level information” with other companies and for greater transparency about the number of data requests received and fulfilled by law enforcement agencies.

While all companies have indicated that they agree to these standards of practice, there is no law enforcing the rules.

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