Hospital patients with Covid are now younger and get sick less

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Hospital patients with Covid are now younger and getting sick less, as expert says vaccines have broken the chain between infections and serious illness

  • NHS chief Chris Hopson said there is evidence vaccines ‘broke the chain’
  • The number of people who ended up in hospital was consistently lower than in previous waves
  • Health Secretary Matt Hancock described hospitalizations as ‘relatively flat’

Patients hospitalized with Covid-19 are now younger, get sick less and go home earlier, experts have revealed.

Chris Hopson, chief executive of NHS Providers, said there was “very important” evidence that vaccines had “broken the chain” between infection and hospitalization.

The number of people ending up in hospital has been consistently lower than in previous waves, with NHS leaders in virus hotspots reporting declining numbers of hospitalized patients, he revealed.

It comes as Health Secretary Matt Hancock described hospitalizations as 'relatively flat' despite rising number of cases

It comes as Health Secretary Matt Hancock described hospitalizations as ‘relatively flat’ – despite increasing cases

Hospital leaders reported community infection and Covid hospitalizations in hotspots decreased

Hospital leaders reported community infection and Covid hospitalizations in hotspots decreased

Hospital leaders reported community infection and Covid hospitalizations in hotspots decreased

It comes as Health Secretary Matt Hancock described hospitalizations as “relatively flat” – despite the increasing number of cases.

Mr Hopson said NHS Trust leaders reported ‘three consistent features’ regarding hospital admissions, tweeting: ‘First. The number of hospital admissions due to Covid-19 is invariably a lot lower than in previous waves. Second. Patients admitted are on average younger, have less need for critical care, more treatment in general and acute beds, lower acuity and lower death rates.

‘Third. Very low numbers of Covid-19 admissions where patients have had two vaccinations and have built up protection after the second shot.’

He said most people who are hospitalized after two shots have “co-morbidities” — or other major conditions.

Hospital leaders reported that community infection and the number of Covid hospitalizations in hot spots were decreasing, he said.

He called “rising confidence” that vaccines had “broken the chain between Covid-19 infection and high levels of hospitalizations and subsequent deaths in previous waves”, adding that it “feels very important”.

Mr Hopson, whose organization represents England’s NHS Trusts, said the NHS is still under tremendous pressure and there were ‘significant risks’ to consider in the decision to lift restrictions on 21 June. But he added: “Some have misinterpreted us by highlighting this pressure as meaning we don’t want to relax or delay the lockdown on June 21. This is not true. We didn’t ask for a postponement, just for a qualitatively better debate.”

The Indian variant makes up the bulk of all British cases. Early analysis by Public Health England suggested those given the strain — also known as the Delta variant — were twice as likely to receive hospital treatment.

About two-thirds of the people who go to the emergency room with the variant go home the same day

About two-thirds of the people who go to the emergency room with the variant go home the same day

About two-thirds of the people who go to the emergency room with the variant go home the same day

The Indian variant makes up the bulk of all British cases.  Early analysis by Public Health England suggested those given the strain - also known as the Delta variant - were twice as likely to be treated in the hospital.

The Indian variant makes up the bulk of all British cases.  Early analysis by Public Health England suggested those given the strain - also known as the Delta variant - were twice as likely to be treated in the hospital.

The Indian variant makes up the bulk of all British cases. Early analysis by Public Health England suggested that those who got the strain – also known as the Delta variant – were twice as likely to be treated in the hospital

But last week it was found that most patients with it don’t have to spend a single night in the hospital. Official data shows that Britons who received two vaccines make up less than 5 percent of those hospitalized with the strain.

About two-thirds of the people who go to the emergency room with the variant go home the same day.

The latest figures on admitted patients are from Thursday, when 932 were in hospital with Covid. In January there were almost 40,000.

Yesterday on Sky News’ Trevor Phillips On Sunday programme, Mr Hancock said: ‘We have said we will give people enough time before the June 21 date… got to know.

‘That’s in terms of the number of cases, and the number of cases is rising slightly, the number of hospital admissions, it’s much flatter. That’s because the third test, the roll-out of the vaccine, is going very well.’

Sir Jeremy Farrar, a member of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies and director of the medical charity Wellcome Trust, said he was “cautiously optimistic” and that the vaccine rollout had “saved countless lives”.

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