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Hospice nurse becomes a TikTok star after sharing her stories of patients in end of life care

A hospice nurse has become a TikTok star, sharing stories of her work in end-of-life care — including visits from pets and deceased relatives to her outlook on the afterlife.

Penny Smith, 59, from Washington, regularly uploads videos of her experiences to TikTokwhere she has 432,000 followers.

The clips have stunned social media users and racked up millions of views as the nurse gives an inside look at death and what dying patients say to her.

Because she deals with death so much, Penny has had many unusual experiences that led her to believe in the afterlife.

Penny, who didn’t believe in the afterlife until she became a hospice nurse, now uses her job to help her “deal with her father’s death.”

A Washington hospice nurse took to TikTok to share her stories with end-of-life patients in care and the signs of being close to death, including seeing a deceased relative or pet

A Washington hospice nurse took to TikTok to share her stories with end-of-life patients in care and the signs of being close to death, including seeing a deceased relative or pet

Penny, 59, is known on TikTok as 'Hospice Nurse Penny' and has amassed over 400,000 followers and shares her afterlife stories with them

Penny, 59, is known on TikTok as ‘Hospice Nurse Penny’ and has amassed over 400,000 followers and shares her afterlife stories with them

Penny notes that it is very common for dying patients to claim to see loved ones or pets who have died

Penny notes that it is very common for dying patients to claim to see loved ones or pets who have died

Part of the hospice nurse’s job is meeting many unique and tragic patients.

Penny notes that “The most profound is when a dying person tells you that they are being visited by someone who has died, adding that this happens when a patient is “completely clear and can tell clearly who they are seeing.”

“Seeing people seeing ‘ghosts’ or whatever entity they see has confirmed my belief in me that there is something more,” Penny shared in her viral TikTok.

Often patients with Penny relate how they have seen deceased loved ones in their own room. Penny described a time when a patient “saw his wife in the corner of the ceiling of the room” and told her she would come get him “but not today, tomorrow.”

Many dying people also share their regrets and final thoughts with the hospice nurse.

Penny notes that the most common things she hears from patients as a hospice nurse are people who “wish they had worked less, spent more time with family.”

She went on to describe an unforgettable experience when a man told her he was “regretted doing chemo for his lung cancer,” the man died the same afternoon he shared it with Penny.

In a viral video, Penny once faked a patient of hers looking for her cat until she later realized it was her old cat that had died.

In a viral video, Penny once faked a patient of hers looking for her cat until she later realized it was her old cat that had died.

Hospice nurse imitated signs of people on the brink of death, such as a dying man raising his arms as if waiting for a ghost to hug them

Hospice nurse imitated signs of people on the brink of death, such as a dying man raising his arms as if waiting for a ghost to hug them

In a viral TikTok video, Penny shares key indicators that someone is close to death, including how they usually claim to see a dead relative

In a viral TikTok video, Penny shares key indicators that someone is close to death, including how they usually claim to see a dead relative

While mimicking signs of death in a viral video, Penny shared that when people die, they experience life-changing thoughts, including things they regret.

While mimicking signs of death in a viral video, Penny shared that when people die, they experience life-changing thoughts, including things they regret.

Many dying people also share their regrets and final thoughts with the hospice nurse.

Penny notes that the most common things she hears from patients as a hospice nurse are people who wish “they had worked less, spent more time with family.”

She went on to describe an unforgettable experience when a man told her he was “regretted doing chemo for his lung cancer,” the man died the same afternoon he shared it with Penny.

‘Hospice Nurse Penny’s’ Signs of Death

  • Seeing a dead relative or pet: Penny notes that just before dying, a patient will claim to see their dead relative or pet nearby
  • Raising arms in the air: Hospice nurse describes that dhow patients usually raise their arms as if waiting for a ghost to come to justice for death
  • Share their regrets: Penny says almost all patients share their regrets in life, such as working too much or not spending enough time with family
  • Don’t eat: Nurse adds that when someone is close to death, they stop eating because they don’t believe they need to fuel their body for longer

Unfortunately, the job also involves some very difficult situations, including family tensions.

She said, “There’s nothing worse than having a patient who hasn’t put their wishes in writing or assigned someone to speak on their behalf.”

The hospice nurse shared the time when “a person is designated as the decision maker and they arm it by withholding visitation rights.”

She described a time when a young patient’s wife “didn’t want to visit his mother anymore,” saying it was “heartbreaking.”

The hospice nurse also claims that relatives withheld painkillers.

Despite some negative experiences, Penny loves her job and has also had many positive moments with her patients.

She said: “My favorite was finally managing my 42-year-old lung cancer patient’s pain to the point where her young daughters and I could give her a bed bath and dress her in her favorite leopard-print t-shirt and panties,” she added. ready. that it was a ‘special and meaningful experience’.

Washington nurse has said people can look 'terrifying' when they are near death

Washington nurse has said people can look ‘terrifying’ when they are near death

Penny echoed patients' last thoughts, including that dying patients often think their dead relatives are coming

Penny echoed patients’ last thoughts, including that dying patients often think their dead relatives are coming

Hospice nurse has gained more than 400,000 followers on TikTok by sharing her death stories

Hospice nurse has gained more than 400,000 followers on TikTok by sharing her death stories

In one of her most popular videos, which has 7.8 million views and more than 331,000 likes, she reveals her beliefs while someone is dying.

In the clip, she plays someone holding up their arms as they slip away, before suggesting that this could mean a ghost is hugging them.

Users took to the comments to share their unusual experiences after someone close to them died.

“The night before my father died, he asked me if I was pregnant. A week later I took a test and it confirmed I am pregnant! It’s great,” commented one viewer.

Another person added: ‘Heaven is real. This life is only a trial. Be nice to others,” followed by a thumbs up emoji.

In a second clip, which has more than 4.7 million views and 262,000 likes, she shares a different belief about another spirit that welcomes one to the afterlife.

In the video, she plays someone who strokes the air above their chests as they peacefully “death” while lying in bed.

Shortly after, she shows the ghost of a cat being caressed by their owner on the screen.

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TikTok users were quick to share their thoughts on Penny's stories and include their own experiences with loved ones

TikTok users were quick to share their thoughts on Penny’s stories and include their own experiences with loved ones

In another clip, which has racked up 1.3 million views and 52,000 likes, Penny reveals why we don’t want to eat towards the end.

In the video, she explains that although we love food, it acts as ‘fuel’ for our bodies – which we don’t need when we die, because our bodies ‘shut down’.

As a result, our body sends the message that we don’t need to eat, leading to loss of appetite.

The nurse believes that TV shows and movies can often make death look glamorous with peaceful expressions and closed eyes – when in reality people are not prepared for what a dying person physically looks like.

She said: ‘Usually people’s eyes are open or partially open, sometimes the eye color seems to change, the jaw drops down with the mouth open, and the skin can become waxy and gray or yellow.

Most of the time, the dying process can be ‘frightening to see your person happen’, although this is normal, ‘understanding this helps to allay fear’.

“Don’t be afraid to talk about the ‘elephant in the room,’ people usually know they’re going to die.”

“We live in our body, we know when it changes.”

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