Hopes New Baby Silvery Gibbons at Mogo Zoo Will Help Save Critically Endangered Species

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Telo the baby Silvery Gibbon clings tightly to mother at Mogo Zoo – unaware that her birth has given hope for the endangered species’ survival

  • Mogo Zoo Celebrates the Birth of a New Silvery Gibbons Named Telo
  • The new baby is from one of the world’s most endangered primate species
  • It is hoped that Telo will eventually help bring the species back from the brink of extinction
  • She will cling to her mother Layar at the zoo for the next six months zes

The birth of a silver gibbon at Mogo Wildlife Park has sparked a ray of optimism about the endangered species’ survival.

Telo, a girl, was born last Friday in the wildlife park on the south coast of New South Wales.

The zoo said the birth of Telo demonstrates the success of the park’s breeding program, which aims to save the silver gibbon species.

The monkeys are native to the Indonesian island of Java and are at risk of extinction due to the illegal pet trade and land clearing.

Mogo Zoo celebrates the birth of a new Silvery Gibbons named Telo (pictured with mama Layar), a baby of one of the most endangered primate species in the world

Mogo Zoo celebrates the birth of a new Silvery Gibbons named Telo (pictured with mama Layar), a baby of one of the most endangered primate species in the world

“Welcome to the Telo family. Such a beautiful little girl and already stealing the hearts of every visitor you see,” the zoo posted on social media.

“As one of only three institutions in Australia that are home to silver gibbons, the birth of Telo is critical to the conservation of this endangered species.”

Mogo zookeeper Chad Staples told About Regional the baby monkeys were born largely bald and showed their pink skin, but would soon develop the silvery fur that gives the species its name.

He said Mother Layar was “very confident” and hoped her oldest daughter, six-year-old Jawa, would watch and learn from her example.

“Especially for the oldest, who could be the next breeder, it’s really important to see Mommy do all this,” he said.

Mogo Zoo hopes Telo (pictured with mama Layar) will eventually join their breeding program and help save the Silvery Gibbon species from extinction

Mogo Zoo hopes Telo (pictured with mama Layar) will eventually join their breeding program and help save the Silvery Gibbon species from extinction

The zoo hopes to pair Jawa with a male soon.

“Once you have a bonded pair, they will reproduce,” he said.

“One of the biggest problems is making sure you have a forever home for their offspring and mate for them so they can continue to succeed.”

Telo will stay with her mother until she is seven years old, then hopefully she will continue in the breeding program.

In addition to habitat loss and poaching, a major factor behind Silvery Gibbons’ vulnerability is that mothers only give birth to a single offspring once every three years and are pregnant for about seven months.

Habit destruction and the illegal pet trade have reduced the number of silver gibbons in the wild on Jave to an estimated 4,000.

Telo will cling to her mother Layar for the next six months, and visitors can visit the pair at Mogo Zoo from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. every day.

Telo clings to her mother for the next six months, and visitors can see the pair roaming around Mogo's zoo

Telo clings to her mother for the next six months, and visitors can see the pair roaming around Mogo’s zoo

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