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Hong Kong students in Perth are afraid to criticize China’s crackdown on their home country

Death threats followed by mysterious cars – Australian students live in fear as pro-Chinese activists attack them for criticizing Hong Kong’s oppression

  • Pro-Hong Kong democracy students living in Australia fear for security
  • Students claim that they have been followed and that they have been threatened with death by Chinese
  • Come in the wake of China’s strict new security laws in their homeland

Hong Kong nationals studying in Australia are deeply concerned about their security, claiming they have been intimidated, spied on and threatened with death by Chinese nationals.

Two students active in the pro-Hong Kong democracy movement in Perth said they were intimidated for criticizing China strict new security laws in their home country.

The new laws have outlawed all expressions of political views, slogans, and signs that advocate Hong Kong’s independence or liberation.

25-year-old Mary from Hong Kong claimed she had been threatened with death after her address and personal information was widely shared on the Chinese social platform WeChat by those seeking to silence her.

She recalled being followed home by Chinese nationals after attending an activist meeting in Perth last year.

Pro-Hong Kong democracy activists living in Australia say they cannot return home after the new security laws imposed by China.  Depicted is a riot police seeking a woman during a demonstration at a shopping center in Hong Kong

Pro-Hong Kong democracy activists living in Australia say they cannot return home after the new security laws imposed by China. Depicted is a riot police seeking a woman during a demonstration at a shopping center in Hong Kong

“The police … told them to leave and then they just waited in their car and followed us to my apartment building,” Mary told the ABC.

“Later that day when I went down to pick up my order, I saw that car still there. It is simply not safe for us to even be in such a free country. ‘

Fellow Pro-Hong Kong democracy activist ‘John’, 24, also claimed he was being followed, had his personal data shared widely and photographed by Chinese citizens in Perth.

“After the protest, I ran back to my accommodation, and while I was working out in the gym … some Chinese took pictures of me,” he recalled.

Despite the intimidation, the students plan to stay in Australia for the time being.

A student thinks she would be arrested if she returns to Hong Kong.  Shown is a shopping center in Hong Kong that is heavily guarded by riot police this week

A student thinks she would be arrested if she returns to Hong Kong.  Shown is a shopping center in Hong Kong that is heavily guarded by riot police this week

A student thinks she would be arrested if she returns to Hong Kong. Shown is a shopping center in Hong Kong that is heavily guarded by riot police this week

John returned to Hong Kong for several months last year when he took part in protests saying he had been sprayed with tear gas and pepper balls.

He supports the idea of ​​a special visa for demonstrators of pro-Hong Kong democracy, so that they can stay in Australia and rather live here than in his home country.

Mary thinks she would be arrested if she returned to Hong Kong and closed bank accounts related to her parents who still live there.

She has considered applying for asylum in Australia for the past six months, but remains torn to cut ties with her home country.

“As soon as we accept that [asylum] offer that we can’t go home forever and that is my biggest concern, even though I know returning home is very risky when I still don’t want to know I can’t actually go home forever, ‘said Mary.

New laws have outlawed all expressions of political views, slogans, and signs that advocate Hong Kong's independence or liberation.

New laws have outlawed all expressions of political views, slogans, and signs that advocate Hong Kong's independence or liberation.

New laws have outlawed all expressions of political views, slogans, and signs that advocate Hong Kong’s independence or liberation.

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