Advertisements
A photojournalist collapses during clashes between protesters and police during an anti-parallel trade march in Sheung Shui district in Hong Kong

The streets of Hong Kong have again descended into violence, as protesters collided with the police who shrunk the masses with shields, sticks and pepper spray.

Advertisements

Thousands of protesters today marched in the border town of Sheung Shui to train against Chinese traders, and attracted recent anger over proposed extradition legislation to show their support.

The march began peacefully, but it didn't take long before annoying skirmishes broke out when Protestants began to tinker with officers who took revenge by defeating the protesters.

Dramatic photos show masked protesters who are hurling with ancient police who are seen as they wrestle people on the ground.

The protesters used umbrellas to protect themselves, but some members sustained injuries, including one man who received treatment in a puddle of his own blood.

A photojournalist collapses during clashes between protesters and police during an anti-parallel trade march in Sheung Shui district in Hong Kong

A photojournalist collapses during clashes between protesters and police during an anti-parallel trade march in Sheung Shui district in Hong Kong

Today's dramatic photos show umbrella-wielding protesters charging to the police who fight them back with bats and riot devices
Advertisements

Today's dramatic photos show umbrella-wielding protesters charging to the police who fight them back with bats and riot devices

Today's dramatic photos show umbrella-wielding protesters charging to the police who fight them back with bats and riot devices

Thousands of protesters today marched in the border town of Sheung Shui to train against Chinese traders, and attracted the anger that triggered mammoth meetings against proposed extradition laws.

Thousands of protesters today marched in the border town of Sheung Shui to train against Chinese traders, and attracted the anger that triggered mammoth meetings against proposed extradition laws.

Thousands of protesters today marched in the border town of Sheung Shui to train against Chinese traders, and attracted the anger that triggered mammoth meetings against proposed extradition laws.

The streets of Hong Kong have again descended into violence because protesters have struck the police who fought the masses with shields, sticks and pepper spray

The streets of Hong Kong have again descended into violence because protesters have struck the police who fought the masses with shields, sticks and pepper spray

The streets of Hong Kong have again descended into violence because protesters have struck the police who fought the masses with shields, sticks and pepper spray

The civil unrest has plagued Hong Kong this summer because the former British colony has been trying to cope with the biggest political crisis since it became a Chinese territory in 1997.

Advertisements

Protesters used widespread anger over the hated rendition law to drum up songs to demonstrate against so-called & # 39; parallel traders & # 39; in Sheung Shui who buy bulk quantities of duty-free goods, which they then transport back to China to sell.

The small traders on the mainland have long been a source of anger at some people in Hong Kong who claim they have fueled inflation, avoided taxes, watered down the city's identity and caused a peak in property prices.

It is another example of what Hong Kong citizens see as bowing to Beijing, saw a backlash in the form of violent street protests.

Ryan Lai, 50 years old, said on Sheung Shui: “Our beautiful city has become chaos. We do not want to stop traveling and buying, but please make it neat and legal.

& # 39; The extradition law was the turning point that we had to let come. We want Sheung Shui back. & # 39;

The protesters used umbrellas to protect themselves, but some members sustained injuries, including one man who received treatment in a puddle of his own blood
Advertisements

The protesters used umbrellas to protect themselves, but some members sustained injuries, including one man who received treatment in a puddle of his own blood

The protesters used umbrellas to protect themselves, but some members sustained injuries, including one man who received treatment in a puddle of his own blood

The protests were aimed at so-called & # 39; parallel traders & # 39; in Sheung Shui who buy bulk quantities of duty-free goods, which they then transport back to China to sell.

The protests were aimed at so-called & # 39; parallel traders & # 39; in Sheung Shui who buy bulk quantities of duty-free goods, which they then transport back to China to sell.

The protests were aimed at so-called & # 39; parallel traders & # 39; in Sheung Shui who buy bulk quantities of duty-free goods, which they then transport back to China to sell.

Civil unrest has plagued Hong Kong this summer because the former British colony has been trying to cope with the biggest political crisis since it became a Chinese territory in 1993

Civil unrest has plagued Hong Kong this summer because the former British colony has been trying to cope with the biggest political crisis since it became a Chinese territory in 1993

Advertisements

Civil unrest has plagued Hong Kong this summer because the former British colony has been trying to cope with the biggest political crisis since it became a Chinese territory in 1993

Hundreds stormed the legislature on July 1 to oppose the extradition law now imposed that would have allowed suspected criminals to be sent to China for trial in Hong Kong.

Critics see the bill as a threat to the rule of law in Hong Kong. Chief Executive Carrie Lam said this week that the bill & # 39; dead & # 39; was after suspending the previous month, but opponents promise to settle for nothing less than the formal withdrawal.

Protests against the bill had largely taken place in the central business district, but protesters have recently begun to look elsewhere to widen support by including smaller, more domestic issues.

Amy Chan, a 25-year-old bank employee who took part in today's march, called it an ongoing action following the momentum of protests against extradition legislation.

Advertisements

& # 39; There is not an anti-extradition protest every day to keep us alive & # 39 ;, she said. & # 39; I hope that today's action will not leave people in Hong Kong forgetting that there are actually many other social issues that need to be resolved. & # 39;

Anti-extradition demonstrators were planning a new demonstration on Sunday in the city of Sha Tin, in the so-called New Territories between Hong Kong Island and the border with China.

The rally knocked on the anger that was seen toward the extradition voucher, which it used to drum up mammoth numbers from today's march

The rally knocked on the anger that was seen toward the extradition voucher, which it used to drum up mammoth numbers from today's march

The rally knocked on the anger that was seen toward the extradition voucher, which it used to drum up mammoth numbers from today's march

Police clad in riot devices and armed with shields were deployed to maintain peace during today's march, which descended into violence

Police clad in riot devices and armed with shields were deployed to maintain peace during today's march, which descended into violence

Police clad in riot devices and armed with shields were deployed to maintain peace during today's march, which descended into violence

Protests against the bill had largely taken place in the central business district, but protesters have recently started looking elsewhere to increase support by including narrower, more domestic problems

Protests against the bill had largely taken place in the central business district, but protesters have recently started looking elsewhere to increase support by including narrower, more domestic problems

Protests against the bill had largely taken place in the central business district, but protesters have recently started looking elsewhere to increase support by including narrower, more domestic problems

. [TagsToTranslate] Dailymail