Hong Kong protesters insisted on & # 39; escalation of actions & # 39; to put pressure on the government to repeal the extradition law

Hong Kong is bold again for fresh rallies, strikes and transportation delays on Friday, as protesters have given the city government until tomorrow to meet their demands to repeal a very unpopular extradition law.

Many fear that the demonstrations would become violent because pro-democratic activists urged protesters to escalate their actions & # 39; if the Hong Kong government fails to meet their requirements by 5 p.m. at the latest.

Protesters demand that chief executive Carrie Lam categorically include a withdrawal from the extradition law, investigate police violence during the rally & # 39; s and withdraw her designation of last Wednesday's protest as a & # 39; rel & # 39; in. They also want her to release the arrested and promise not to prosecute anyone against rioting charges.

Messages circulating on social media and message apps called on people to launch a massive & # 39; resistance movement & # 39; to be organized at 7 a.m. on Friday if the government does not meet the deadline, including not attending work and lessons and gathering outside the government headquarters. One message that the message on the LIHKG forum issues has won more than 9,300 likes.

& # 39; More demonstrations and resistance will happen soon if Carrie Lam does not know what respect means & # 39 ;, said Joshua Wong (photo center), an activist who became the face of the pro-democratic & # 39; Umbrella Movement & # 39; from 2014 from Hong Kong

& # 39; More demonstrations and resistance will happen soon if Carrie Lam does not know what respect means & # 39 ;, said Joshua Wong (photo center), an activist who became the face of the pro-democratic & # 39; Umbrella Movement & # 39; from 2014 from Hong Kong

Protesters gather Monday outside the Hong Kong Legislative Council building in protest against a very unpopular extradition law

Protesters gather Monday outside the Hong Kong Legislative Council building in protest against a very unpopular extradition law

Protesters gather Monday outside the Hong Kong Legislative Council building in protest against a very unpopular extradition law

Protesters are demanding chief executive Carrie Lam (photo) states categorically a withdrawal from extradition law, investigating police brutality complaints during the rally & # 39; s pulling her designation of last Wednesday's protest as a & # 39; rel & # 39;

Protesters are demanding chief executive Carrie Lam (photo) states categorically a withdrawal from extradition law, investigating police brutality complaints during the rally & # 39; s pulling her designation of last Wednesday's protest as a & # 39; rel & # 39;

Protesters are demanding chief executive Carrie Lam (photo) states categorically a withdrawal from extradition law, investigating police brutality complaints during the rally & # 39; s pulling her designation of last Wednesday's protest as a & # 39; rel & # 39;

It was unclear how many people could respond to that call. One of the groups that has signed a notification about the plan has more than 35,000 members.

A user comment on the forum said the march against extradition law for the sake of justice, freedom and conscience, and for the people of Hong Kong & # 39; is.

Another user urged people to donate items such as glasses, umbrellas and helmets for the rally, and reminded demonstrators to bear the risk of injury and arrest. The one called it & # 39; Hong Kong & # 39; s final battle & # 39 ;.

Messages circulating on social media and message apps called on people to launch a massive & # 39; resistance movement & # 39; to be organized at 7 a.m. on Friday if the government does not meet the deadline, including not attending work and lessons and gathering outside the government headquarters

Messages circulating on social media and message apps called on people to launch a massive & # 39; resistance movement & # 39; to be organized at 7 a.m. on Friday if the government does not meet the deadline, including not attending work and lessons and gathering outside the government headquarters

Messages circulating on social media and message apps called on people to launch a massive & # 39; resistance movement & # 39; to be organized at 7 a.m. on Friday if the government does not meet the deadline, including not attending work and lessons and gathering outside the government headquarters

It was unclear how many people would respond to the call to come out on Friday. One of the groups that has signed a notification about the plan has more than 35,000 members

It was unclear how many people would respond to that call to arrive on Friday. One of the groups that has signed a notification about the plan has more than 35,000 members

It was unclear how many people would respond to the call to come out on Friday. One of the groups that has signed a notification about the plan has more than 35,000 members

Protesters participate in a Sunday demonstration to demand a full withdrawal of a Hong Kong rendition bundle after Lam & # 39; s suspension of the bill on Saturday did not suppress public anger

Protesters participate in a Sunday demonstration to demand a full withdrawal of a Hong Kong rendition bundle after Lam & # 39; s suspension of the bill on Saturday did not suppress public anger

Protesters participate in a Sunday demonstration to demand a full withdrawal of a Hong Kong rendition bundle after Lam & # 39; s suspension of the bill on Saturday did not suppress public anger

The flurry of reports comes after protesters have turned down an apology from Lam, saying that the Beijing-backed show-deaf remained for public demands.

& # 39; More demonstrations and resistance will soon happen if Carrie Lam does not know what respect means & said, "Joshua Wong, an activist who became the face of the pro-democratic & # 39; Umbrella Movement & # 39; from 2014 from Hong Kong.

He said he expected & # 39; upgraded, more progressive actions & # 39; to see in the coming days.

At the same time, a group of university student union delegates called for Friday morning outside the government headquarters in the Admiralty district to participate in a peaceful protest.

Protesters demand that chief executive Carrie Lam categorically include a withdrawal from the extradition law, investigate police violence complaints during the meetings and withdraw her designation of last Wednesday's protest as a & # 39; rel & # 39;

Protesters demand that chief executive Carrie Lam categorically include a withdrawal from the extradition law, investigate police violence complaints during the meetings and withdraw her designation of last Wednesday's protest as a & # 39; rel & # 39;

Protesters demand that chief executive Carrie Lam categorically include a withdrawal from the extradition law, investigate police violence complaints during the meetings and withdraw her designation of last Wednesday's protest as a & # 39; rel & # 39;

In addition to police brutality investigations, protesters also want Carrie Lam to release the arrested and promises no one to prosecute for riot costs

In addition to police brutality investigations, protesters also want Carrie Lam to release the arrested and promises no one to prosecute for riot costs

In addition to police brutality investigations, protesters also want Carrie Lam to release the arrested and promises no one to prosecute for riot costs

Protesters confront police after firing tear gas at unarmed demonstrators during a violent rally last Wednesday

Protesters confront police after firing tear gas at unarmed demonstrators during a violent rally last Wednesday

Protesters confront police after firing tear gas at unarmed demonstrators during a violent rally last Wednesday

Small groups of activists stay in the streets around the city's legislature this morning, setting up supply stations with water, food and first aid kits awaiting future mobilization.

Members of the Hungarian Legislature met today for the first time since the protests, with opposition lawmakers hurling the pro-Beijing government in the face of the crisis.

Many pro-democratic members of the Legislative Council wore black and white chrysanthemums as a tribute to a man who fell during the protest against the law.

Some placed placards on their desks with the text & # 39; No China Extradition & # 39; and & # 39; Withdraw, Draw & # 39 ;.

Opponents of the proposed extradition law, including lawyers and rights groups, say that the Chinese legal system is characterized by torture, forced confession, arbitrary detention and poor access to lawyers. Above, Joshua Wong photographed outside the government headquarters yesterday

Opponents of the proposed extradition law, including lawyers and rights groups, say that the Chinese legal system is characterized by torture, forced confession, arbitrary detention and poor access to lawyers. Above, Joshua Wong photographed outside the government headquarters yesterday

Opponents of the proposed extradition law, including lawyers and rights groups, say that the Chinese legal system is characterized by torture, forced confession, arbitrary detention and poor access to lawyers. Above, Joshua Wong photographed outside the government headquarters yesterday

Many pro-democratic members of the Legislative Council today wore black and white chrysanthemums as a tribute to a man who died while protesting against the law

Many pro-democratic members of the Legislative Council today wore black and white chrysanthemums as a tribute to a man who died while protesting against the law

Many pro-democratic members of the Legislative Council today wore black and white chrysanthemums as a tribute to a man who died while protesting against the law

The 35-year-old man, identified as Leung, is seen as a Protestant with a banner hung on the roof of the Pacific Place shopping mall in Admiralty on Saturday before he died in a fall

The 35-year-old man, identified as Leung, is seen as a Protestant with a banner hung on the roof of the Pacific Place shopping mall in Admiralty on Saturday before he died in a fall

The 35-year-old man, identified as Leung, is seen as a Protestant with a banner hung on the roof of the Pacific Place shopping mall in Admiralty on Saturday before he died in a fall

After the first mass demonstration on June 9 and June 12 in clash between police and demonstrators, Lam suspended the extradition law on Saturday, which would allow Hong Kong suspects to be tried in Chinese Chinese courts.

Videos from police who beat unarmed protesters went viral and aroused public anger, and tactics were condemned. According to the police, violence was needed to ward off protesters with stones and metal bars.

But the suspension failed to suppress public anger, and protesters carried out an even larger rally on Sunday that attracted more than two million people, according to organizers, who demanded that the bill be completely withdrawn and Lam resigned.

Members of the Legislative Council today hold a minute's silence on the man who had lost his death Saturday night after trying to hang a protest banner on a jetty

Members of the Legislative Council today hold a minute's silence on the man who had lost his death Saturday night after trying to hang a protest banner on a jetty

Members of the Legislative Council today hold a minute's silence on the man who had lost his death Saturday night after trying to hang a protest banner on a jetty

Many of the demonstrators walked slowly as they shouted & # 39; retreat & # 39; and & # 39; resign & # 39; while they marched through huge parts of Hong Kong on Sunday. Above: Protesters hold a banner with a message that reads: & # 39; Say no to police gangs, protect our students & # 39;

Many of the demonstrators walked slowly as they shouted & # 39; retreat & # 39; and & # 39; resign & # 39; while they marched through huge parts of Hong Kong on Sunday. Above: Protesters hold a banner with a message that reads: & # 39; Say no to police gangs, protect our students & # 39;

Many of the demonstrators walked slowly as they shouted & # 39; retreat & # 39; and & # 39; resign & # 39; while they marched through huge parts of Hong Kong on Sunday. Above: Protesters hold a banner with a message that reads: & # 39; Say no to police gangs, protect our students & # 39;

& # 39; I heard people loud and clear … I offer my sincere apology to every Hong Kong citizen & # 39 ;, said the chief executive at a press conference on Tuesday. & # 39; This incident made me realize that I have to do better. & # 39;

Lam said that unless the government was able to resolve concerns about the proposed laws, we will not resume the legislative exercise.

Opponents of the extradition proposal fear that the Hong Kong people will become entangled in China's notoriously opaque and politicized justice system and threaten those critical of Beijing policies.

The formidable business world of the city was also frightened by the law, which they feared would harm Hong Kong's reputation as a safe business center.

Why does Hong Kong's extradition law raise protests?

The Hong Kong government has suspended the debate on an extradition law for an indefinite period of time, allowing people to be sent to mainland China for the first time following chaotic protests from tens of thousands of people.

Hong Kong residents, as well as foreign and Chinese citizens living or traveling through the global financial center, are all at risk if they are sought on the mainland.

Pro-establishment political forces are dominant in the Legislative Council and the bill is expected to be adopted at the end of the month.

WHAT DOES THE EXTRADITION BILL MEAN?

Protesters marching along a street in the city against proposed changes to an extradition law in Hong Kong on Sunday last week

Protesters marching along a street in the city against proposed changes to an extradition law in Hong Kong on Sunday last week

Protesters marching along a street in the city against proposed changes to an extradition law in Hong Kong on Sunday last week

The Hong Kong government first launched the proposals in February and introduced major changes that simplify the case-by-case extradition of criminal suspects to countries outside the 20 with which Hong Kong has existing extradition treaties.

It allows express renditions from Hong Kong to larger China, including the mainland, Taiwan and Macau, and concludes what Hong Kong government officials have repeatedly described as a & # 39; loophole & # 39; which they claim has made the city a refuge. mainland criminals.

The Hong Kong leader would begin and eventually approve an extradition following a request from a foreign jurisdiction, but only after court hearings, including any appeals. However, the bill removes the supervision by the Extradition Regulations Act.

WHY DOES THE GOVERNMENT OF HONG KONG DO THIS NOW?

Officials initially seized the murder last year of a young Hong Kong woman who was on holiday in Taiwan to justify rapid changes. Police say her boyfriend has known about his return to Hong Kong and that he is now in jail for less money laundering.

The Taiwan authorities are strongly opposed to the law, which they believe can expose Taiwanese citizens in Hong Kong and vowed not to take back the murder suspect if the law is passed.

A long-forgotten issue, the need for a possible extradition agreement with the mainland, was recognized by government officials and experts for the transfer of Hong Kong by the British to Chinese rule in 1997 under the & # 39; one country, two systems & # 39; – fashion model.

The city has a separate and independent legal system as part of the wider freedoms that the formula guarantees. Since then, little progress has been made in discreet discussions with mainland judicial and security officials, where the Communist Party still controls the courts.

HOW STRONG IS AN OPPOSITION TO THE ACCOUNT?

Protest placards and flowers are shown during a demonstration in Hong Kong on 11 June to request authorities to scrap a proposed extradition law with China

Protest placards and flowers are shown during a demonstration in Hong Kong on 11 June to request authorities to scrap a proposed extradition law with China

Protest placards and flowers are shown during a demonstration in Hong Kong on 11 June to request authorities to scrap a proposed extradition law with China

Concerns about the amendments have accelerated in recent weeks, with pro-cases and pro-Beijing elements generally not in the mood to publicly contradict Hong Kong or Chinese governments.

Senior Hong Kong judges have personally apologized and mainland lawyers based in Hong Kong have echoed their fears and claim that the mainland cannot be trusted to meet even the basic standards of justice. Hong Kong law groups have made detailed comments to the government in the hope of forcing an extension.

The authorities have repeatedly stressed that judges will serve as & # 39; gatekeepers & # 39; or guardians of extradition requests. However, some judges publicly say that China's increasingly close relationship with Hong Kong and the limited scope of extradition hearings will expose them to criticism and political pressure from Beijing.

Schools, lawyers and church groups have become members of human rights organizations to protest against the measures. After a quarrel in the legislature over the bill, the government proceeded to speed up the bill by scrapping established legislative procedures that have sparked outrage among critics.

Policemen guard the guard outside the Legislative Council building because people protest against extradition law with China in Hong Kong on the night of June 11

Policemen guard the guard outside the Legislative Council building because people protest against extradition law with China in Hong Kong on the night of June 11

Policemen guard the guard outside the Legislative Council building because people protest against extradition law with China in Hong Kong on the night of June 11

Foreign political and diplomatic pressure on human rights issues is also increasing. In addition to recent statements by US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and his British and German counterparts, seven European Union delegates met with President Carrie Lam of Hong Kong to formally protest.

& # 39; It is a proposal, or a series of proposals, that strike a terrible blow … against the rule of law, against the stability and security of Hong Kong, against Hong Kong's position as a major international trade center, & # 39 ; Chris Patten, the last British governor of Hong Kong, said on Thursday.

Some opposition politicians say that the problem is now a turning point for the free status of the city.

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