Hitler's representative had NOT switched to a double

Rudolf Hess is depicted on the grounds of the Spandau prison where he spent 41 years

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Rudolf Hess is depicted on the grounds of the Spandau prison where he spent 41 years

Hess was the eldest of three children in Alexandria, Egypt born to ethnically German parents in 1897.

He was sent to boarding school in 1908 to study and enrolled in 1919 at the University of Munich, where he read history and economics.

There he learned about the Lebensraum concept, & # 39; living space & # 39 ;, which was used by his professor Karl Haushofer as a justification for Germany to conquer land in Eastern Europe.

He later introduced the concept to Hitler, who made it one of the pillars of Nazi party ideology.

Hess served in the armed forces during the First World War, where his first report was against the British in the Battle of the Somme. He was also there for the first Battle of Ypres.

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He received both the Iron and Military Merit Cross and resignation in 1918.

Rudolf Hess is pictured with Adolf Hitler on a public holiday in Nuremberg, Germany

Rudolf Hess is pictured with Adolf Hitler on a public holiday in Nuremberg, Germany

Rudolf Hess is pictured with Adolf Hitler on a public holiday in Nuremberg, Germany

After hearing Adolf Hitler for the first time at a meeting in Munich in 1920, Hess became fully committed to him.

He shared Hitler & # 39; s & # 39; stab in the back & # 39; theory that Germany lost the Great War because the Jews and the Bolsheviks conspired.

Hess joined the NSDAP in 1920 and, over time, worked increasingly closely with the leader.

In November 1923, Hitler decided to overthrow the Bavarian leader Gustav Von Kahr with the SA.

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A gun-wielding Hitler interrupted Kahr's speech and called for a national revolution. The following day, Hitler and thousands of his supporters marched to the War Department, where shots were fired and 14 protesters and four police officers were killed.

Both Hess and Hitler were sent to Landsberg prison, where the latter wrote his autobiography Mein Kamph.

He dictated it to Hess and rewarded him by giving him the position of substitute Fuhrer when the couple was released.

Rudolf Hess was Hitler's right-hand man in the Third Reich during the 1930s and assumed his position as his deputy in April 1933.

He became increasingly marginalized after the Second World War broke out, while Hitler was increasingly concerned with foreign policy and not with internal affairs.

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Hess was deeply concerned about Hitler's plans to invade Russia, fearing that Germany would wage war on two fronts.

A young Hess gives the Nazi greeting at the opening of the Adolf Hitler Canal in 1939

A young Hess gives the Nazi greeting at the opening of the Adolf Hitler Canal in 1939

A young Hess gives the Nazi greeting at the opening of the Adolf Hitler Canal in 1939

He was so worried that he taught himself how to fly so that he could go to Britain to seek a peace agreement from the British government.

It is thought that in May 1941 he flew with the Messerschmitt Bf 110 to Scotland to bring Britain to the negotiating table and put an end to the war.

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He eventually ran out of fuel and landed in Eaglesham, 16 kilometers south of Glasgow.

He was captured by a local police officer and held in custody. Meanwhile, Hitler was furious with the betrayal.

The British spent a whole year debriefing him before he was sent to a medical institution in Monmouthshire, Wales for three years.

After peace returned in 1945, he was tried for war crimes in Nuremberg and sentenced to life behind bars.

Hess was depicted at the height of his power when he was Adolf Hitler's deputy Fuehrer

Hess was depicted at the height of his power when he was Adolf Hitler's deputy Fuehrer

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Hess was depicted at the height of his power when he was Adolf Hitler's deputy Fuehrer

He was found guilty of crimes against peace and conspiracy with other German leaders to commit these crimes. He was not convicted of crimes against humanity.

During the trial, he developed & # 39; memory loss & # 39 ;, unable to reveal details of what happened during the war.

He was eventually declared healthy and fit to stand trial and forced to admit that he had ficted the memory loss as a defense tactic.

It took two months for the court to decide on the conviction. Most of the Nazis who were tried at Nuremberg received the death penalty.

Instead, Hess was sentenced to life imprisonment in the prison in Spandau, West Berlin.

He spent 41 years there, breaking free from his family and often complaining about the food and condition of his heath.

The six other Nazis who were housed there were eventually released, making him the only prisoner.

He hung himself in a summer house that had been built on the grounds for him on August 17, 1987.

After his death, Spandau was demolished to prevent it from becoming a shrine for neo-Nazis.

The Nazi deputy Fuehrer is depicted in his uniform at the height of his power
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The Nazi deputy Fuehrer is depicted in his uniform at the height of his power

The Nazi deputy Fuehrer is depicted in his uniform at the height of his power

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