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Historic heat dome will bake the US for WEEKS with over 265 million Americans affected

A punishing and relentless heat wave will bake the U.S. for weeks from the beginning of this weekend to the end of July, with the historic heat dome enveloping more than 265 million Americans next week.

The heat wave is already underway in the south, and some areas, including Las Vegas and Phoenix, are expected to peak at 110 degrees by Saturday.

However, the rising summer heat is not just limited to the south. Next week, the heat will move north and east, with temperatures reaching 100 degrees across the Ohio Valley and into the Mid-Atlantic, projections show.

The National Weather Service predicts that 75 or more record high temperatures will be matched or broken from Friday to Tuesday alone – and that number is expected to grow significantly by the end of next week.

Meteorologists also predict that Texas and the Southern Plains may record their highest temperatures ever. But among the record breaking, the experts say the biggest story will be how long the heat wave actually lasts.

A punishing and relentless heat wave will start the US for weeks, starting this weekend through late July, with the historic heat dome that will encapsulate over 250 million Americans next week (Sunday's prediction above)

A punishing and relentless heat wave will start the US for weeks, starting this weekend through late July, with the historic heat dome that will encapsulate over 250 million Americans next week (Sunday’s prediction above)

The heat wave is already underway in the south, and some areas - including Las Vegas and Phoenix - are expected to peak at 110 degrees by Saturday

The heat wave is already underway in the south, and some areas - including Las Vegas and Phoenix - are expected to peak at 110 degrees by Saturday

The heat wave is already underway in the south, and some areas – including Las Vegas and Phoenix – are expected to peak at 110 degrees by Saturday

Jeff Masters, Ph.D., the founder of Weather Underground, said CBS NEWS what worries him most are the effects that prolonged heat exposure can have on millions of Americans.

The heat wave will last for a very long time and last for several weeks in some areas, with just a few days of near normal temperatures during that period. This will increase the risk of heat illness and heat-related deaths, ‘said Masters.

Amarillo, Texas, for example, will experience temperatures above 100 degrees for the next 10 consecutive days, with some of those days approaching the 110 mark. The simmering temperatures at this stage of the year are nearly 10 to 20 degrees above the area’s average elevation of 92.

In the past few years, such massive heat outbreaks have become commonly known as heat domes. A heat dome is essentially a vast area of ​​high pressure, which involves hot and dry conditions for days.

The larger a heat dome gets, the hotter and longer a heat wave gets – and experts predict that the coming dome will indeed be a very large one.

According to forecasts, more than 80 percent of the country – or 265 million people – will sweat next week at temperatures of 90 or higher, while another 45 million will be forced to weather the temperatures in the three-digit region.

The larger heat domes grow, the hotter and longer a heat wave gets - and experts predict that the menacing dome will indeed be a very large one (photo: people fill Brighton Beach in Coney Island as New York City on July 5)

The larger heat domes grow, the hotter and longer a heat wave gets - and experts predict that the menacing dome will indeed be a very large one (photo: people fill Brighton Beach in Coney Island as New York City on July 5)

The larger heat domes grow, the hotter and longer a heat wave gets – and experts predict that the menacing dome will indeed be a very large one (photo: people fill Brighton Beach in Coney Island as New York City on July 5)

The rising summer temperatures do not only remain in the south, however

The rising summer temperatures do not only remain in the south, however

The rising summer temperatures do not only remain in the south, however

According to forecasts, more than 80 percent of the country - or 265 million people - will sweat next week at temperatures of 90 or higher, while another 45 million will be forced to weather the temperatures in the three-digit region

According to forecasts, more than 80 percent of the country - or 265 million people - will sweat next week at temperatures of 90 or higher, while another 45 million will be forced to weather the temperatures in the three-digit region

According to forecasts, more than 80 percent of the country – or 265 million people – will sweat next week at temperatures of 90 or higher, while another 45 million will be forced to weather the temperatures in the three-digit region

Excessive heat warnings have been issued by the National Weather Service for Southern California, Southern Nevada and in the southern half of Arizona through Monday, warning of high risks of heat stroke, heat cramps, or heat exhaustion

Excessive heat warnings have been issued by the National Weather Service for Southern California, Southern Nevada and in the southern half of Arizona through Monday, warning of high risks of heat stroke, heat cramps, or heat exhaustion

Excessive heat warnings have been issued by the National Weather Service for Southern California, Southern Nevada and in the southern half of Arizona through Monday, warning of high risks of heat stroke, heat cramps, or heat exhaustion

Most of the heat will build up over the western lower plains and southwest this weekend.

Most of Texas and Oklahoma will experience 100 degrees or higher on Saturday, with the Red River Valley area of ​​northwest Texas and southwest Oklahoma flirting around the 110 region.

With humidity added as a factor, Dallas and Oklahoma City will feel like a blistering 110 degrees, experts say.

The Sunshine State will also live up to its nickname with temperatures continuing to hit the low to mid-90s the following week.

Excessive heat warnings have been issued through the National Weather Service for Southern California, Southern Nevada and in the southern half of Arizona through Monday, warning of high risks of heat stroke, heat cramps, or heat exhaustion.

In Phoenix, Arizona, temperatures rose as high as 116 degrees or higher on Sunday, which would break a record in the late 1800s. The all-time record in Phoenix is ​​122. In nearby Lake Havasu, temperatures can reach 120 on Sundays.

Red flag warnings have also been raised in parts of the Rockies and inland to the west for an increased risk of forest fires.

Excessive heat warnings were issued through the National Weather Service for Southern California, Southern Nevada, and in the southern half of Arizona through Monday, warning of high risks of heat stroke, heat cramps, or heat exhaustion (the firefighters in the photo were working all afternoon at a fast-moving fire in southern Santa Clara County near Gilroy)

Excessive heat warnings were issued through the National Weather Service for Southern California, Southern Nevada, and in the southern half of Arizona through Monday, warning of high risks of heat stroke, heat cramps, or heat exhaustion (the firefighters in the photo were working all afternoon at a fast-moving fire in southern Santa Clara County near Gilroy)

Excessive heat warnings were issued through the National Weather Service for Southern California, Southern Nevada, and in the southern half of Arizona through Monday, warning of high risks of heat stroke, heat cramps, or heat exhaustion (the firefighters in the photo were working all afternoon at a fast-moving fire in southern Santa Clara County near Gilroy)

The National Weather Service predicts that 75 or more record high temperatures will be matched or broken from Friday to Tuesday alone - that number is expected to grow significantly by the end of next week

The National Weather Service predicts that 75 or more record high temperatures will be matched or broken from Friday to Tuesday alone - that number is expected to grow significantly by the end of next week

The National Weather Service predicts that 75 or more record high temperatures will be matched or broken from Friday to Tuesday alone – that number is expected to grow significantly by the end of next week

Early next week, experts say the heat will shift east and north. On Tuesday, mercury in Kansas, Oklahoma and North Texas will reach between 110 and 115. Temperatures will approach the highest ever recorded in these areas – ranging from 112 to 120.

While experts say the heat dome will be severe and long-lasting, it’s unlikely to surpass the dizzying heat waves recorded in the hottest period in American history, the 1930s Dust Bowl era. Almost half of all-time heat records were recorded during this period.

Meteorologist Bob Henson told CBS that given the high bar of the 1930s and some recent years, such as 2012, he doesn’t expect “a streak of all-time or even monthly records.” But I would expect at least a few, as well as some records for consecutive 90/95 / 100F temps. ‘

Henson said July 2020 could end as one of the hottest ever given the ‘breadth and duration of the expected heat.’

According to Henson, this is because the heat forecast in the southwest and in the plains will not remain anchored in one place. A west-to-east control current causes some of the blistering heat to dissipate and flow east from St. Louis to Indianapolis and Pittsburgh, through to Washington, DC. Each of the cities is likely to reach or exceed 100 degrees, Henson said.

Projections show that the heat is unlikely to shift quickly. Heat is expected to continue until at least the end of July.

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