Hillary Clinton and Helen Keller will be removed from the social studies curriculum in Texas

Hillary Clinton

Teachers in Texas schools will no longer need to include lessons about former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton or political activist Helen Keller.

The Texas Board of Education voted Friday to remove Clinton and Keller from the state social studies curriculum after they both received low scores on a questionnaire about the historical background and the legacy.

The Dallas Morning News reports that the board is trying to "streamline" & # 39; the social studies curriculum in the state determining which historical figures are essential to learn and who is not.

The vote to eliminate Clinton and Keller came after a 15-member voluntary task force, nominated by the board, created a scale to qualify the historical figures, according to the media.

The group made their decisions after being asked a series of questions about several famous people in the story.

Hillary Clinton

Helen Keller

Helen Keller

An educational board in Texas voted to eliminate Hillary Clinton (left) and Helen Keller (right) from her social studies plan

The board voted to add the famous evangelist Billy Graham to the curriculum after his death in February

The board voted to add the famous evangelist Billy Graham to the curriculum after his death in February

The board voted to add the famous evangelist Billy Graham to the curriculum after his death in February

Clinton, who is a former first lady and Democratic presidential candidate, got a five on the 20-point scale, reports the Dallas Morning News.

Keller, who was a political activist and the first deaf and blind person to obtain a bachelor of arts degree, earned a seven.

The group estimated that eliminating Clinton from the curriculum would save teachers 30 minutes of instructional time and eliminate Keller would save 40 minutes.

According to the Dallas Morning News, the figures that received a perfect score and will remain as the past of the curriculum include Attorney Barbara Jordan, leader of the Civil Rights Movement, and former Texas Governor Sam Houston.

Misty Matthews, a teacher at Round Rock, told the Morning News that the goal was to "simplify". The study plan.

"We try to make it as objective as possible," he said.

Matthews told the source that students in the state should learn about important figures in social studies class. Clinton was taught to high school students and Keller to third grade students.

Barbara Jordan

Barbara Jordan

Sam Houston

Sam Houston

Barbara Jordan (left), leader of the Civil Rights Movement, and former Texas Governor Sam Houston (right) scored perfect on the questionnaire and will remain in the curriculum

The Battle of the Alamo is considered the high point of the Texas Revolution, but it is considered a controversial issue in representing who the true heroes were.

The Battle of the Alamo is considered the high point of the Texas Revolution, but it is considered a controversial issue in representing who the true heroes were.

The Battle of the Alamo is considered the high point of the Texas Revolution, but it is considered a controversial issue in representing who the true heroes were.

"Stop political correctness in our schools," Governor Greg Abbott, a Republican, said last week.

In addition, the board voted to add the famous evangelist Billy Graham to the curriculum after his death in February.

On Friday, the Texas education committee reversed its recommendation to omit the word "hero" when it taught about the men guarding the Alamo in history class.

The committee has called "heroic", in reference to the Battle of Alamo, a term "loaded with courage". However, Governor Gregg Abbott said in a tweet that schoolchildren must learn that the defenders of El Álamo were "heroic."

"Stop political correctness in our schools," he published. "Of course, Texas schoolchildren should be taught that Alamo's advocates were" Heroic! "I hope the State Board of Education agrees."

Although Clinton and Keller, along with other historical figures, were removed from the curriculum, that does not mean that teachers can not include them in the classes. The change simply means that they are not required to teach students about them.

The board will vote again on the changes in November to finalize them.

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