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High school runner defeats transgender competitor after filing a lawsuit to get her out of the girls category

A female high school runner hit a transgender competitor just two days after she and other student families filed a lawsuit to block athletes with male anatomy because they have an “unfair” advantage.

Canton High School girl Chelsea Mitchell won the class S 55-meter dash title on Friday with her time of 7.18 seconds. She beat Bloomfield High School student Terry Miller 7.20 seconds.

Mitchell also came first in the 300-meter mark, while Miller became 16th and Mitchell won the long jump.

The families of Mitchell, Selina Soule, a senior at Glastonbury High School, and Alanna Smith, a sophomore at Danbury High School, filed a federal lawsuit on Wednesday to block transgender athletes in Connecticut from participating in girl sports.

Canton High School girl Chelsea Mitchell (left) won the class S 55-meter dash title on Friday with her time of 7.18 seconds. She beat Terry Miller's Bloomfield High School student (right) 7.20 seconds

Canton High School girl Chelsea Mitchell (left) won the class S 55-meter dash title on Friday with her time of 7.18 seconds. She beat Terry Miller’s Bloomfield High School student (right) 7.20 seconds

The families of Mitchell (right), Selina Soule (center) and Alanna Smith (left) filed a federal lawsuit on Wednesday to block transgender athletes in Connecticut from participating

The families of Mitchell (right), Selina Soule (center) and Alanna Smith (left) filed a federal lawsuit on Wednesday to block transgender athletes in Connecticut from participating

The families of Mitchell (right), Selina Soule (center) and Alanna Smith (left) filed a federal lawsuit on Wednesday to prevent transgender athletes in Connecticut from participating

The lawsuit revolves around two transgender sprinters, Miller and Andraya Yearwood, who often outperformed their cisgender competitors. Since 2017, according to the court case, the two seniors have together won 15 girls indoor or outdoor championships.

The lawyers of Alliance Defending Freedom had asked the court to prevent the transgender girls from competing while the lawsuit continues.

Wednesday, the day before the indoor indoor championships started, no hearing was planned.

The Connecticut Association of Schools-Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference says its policy follows a national anti-discrimination law that requires students to be treated in school based on the gender they identify with and the group believes that the policy is “appropriate to both the state – as federal law. ”

Connecticut is one of 17 states that have enabled transgender high school athletes to compete without limitations in 2019, according to Transathlete.com, which follows state policies on high school sports across the country.

Eight states had restrictions that make it difficult for transgender athletes to compete while at school, such as forcing athletes to compete based on gender on their birth certificate, or allowing them to participate only after completing the run of sex relocation procedures or hormone therapies, according to Transathlete.

The lawsuit revolves around two transgender sprinters, Miller and Andraya Yearwood (photo), who often outperformed their cisgender competitors. Yearwood and Miller have said they are still working on the transition, but have refused to provide details

The lawsuit revolves around two transgender sprinters, Miller and Andraya Yearwood (photo), who often outperformed their cisgender competitors. Yearwood and Miller have said they are still working on the transition, but have refused to provide details

The lawsuit revolves around two transgender sprinters, Miller and Andraya Yearwood (photo), who often outperformed their cisgender competitors. Yearwood and Miller have said they are still working on the transition, but have refused to provide details

Mitchell had said: 'Our dream is not to come in second or third place, but to win fairly and squarely. We only ask for a fair chance '

Mitchell had said: 'Our dream is not to come in second or third place, but to win fairly and squarely. We only ask for a fair chance '

Mitchell had said: ‘Our dream is not to come in second or third place, but to win fairly and squarely. We only ask for a fair chance ‘

Smith said: “We know the outcome mentally and physically before the race starts”

Yearwood and Miller have said they are still working on the transition, but have refused to provide details.

The three claimants fought directly against them, almost always losing to Miller and mostly behind Yearwood. Mitchell finished third in the 2019 state championship in the 55-meter indoor track race behind Miller and Yearwood for girls.

“Our dream is not to come in second or third place, but to win fairly and squarely,” Mitchell said earlier. “We only ask for a fair chance.”

They claim in the court case that admitting athletes with male anatomy has robbed them of job titles and scholarship opportunities.

“We know the outcome mentally and physically before the race starts,” said Smith, the daughter of former Major League-pitcher Lee Smith.

‘That biological dishonesty does not disappear because of what someone believes in gender identity. All girls deserve the chance to compete on a level playing field. “

The lawsuit was filed against the Connecticut Association of Schools-Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference and the education boards in Bloomfield, Cromwell, Glastonbury, Canton and Danbury.

Yearwood said earlier that she is also a girl and was injured by the efforts to “bring down my successes.” The American Civil Liberties Union said it will represent transgender teenagers and defend Connecticut policies in court. The transgender girls are also protected by Title IX

It follows a Title IX complaint filed last June by the girls’ families and the Alliance Defending Freedom with the US Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, which is investigating the policy.

“Forcing girls to be spectators in their own sport is completely in violation of Title IX, a federal law designed to create equal opportunities for women in education and athletics,” said non-profit organization Alliance Defending Freedom lawyer Christiana Holcomb. “Connecticut’s policy violates that law and reverses advances for women for nearly 50 years.”

Yearwood, a senior at Cromwell High School, and Miller, a senior at Bloomfield High School, had made statements that fiercely defended their right to participate in girls’ events.

“I have been discriminated against in every aspect of my life and no longer want to remain silent,” Miller said. “I’m a girl and I’m a runner. I participate in athletics, just like my colleagues to excel, find community and meaning in my life. It is both unfair and painful that my victories must be attacked and my hard work ignored. “

Yearwood said she is also a girl and was injured by the efforts to “bring down my successes.”

“I’ll never stop being myself!” she said in her statement. “I’ll never stop running! I hope that the next generation of trans youngsters do not have to fight against the fights I have. I hope they can be celebrated if they succeed, not demonized. For the next generation I will run for you! “

The American Civil Liberties Union said it will represent transgender teenagers and defend Connecticut policies in court. Attorney Chase Strangio, Deputy Director for Trans Justice at the ACLU LGBT & HIV Project, said transgender girls are also protected by Title IX.

“The idea that the law only protects individuals with XX chromosomes compared to individuals with XY chromosomes is nowhere to be found in the legislative history of Title IX, in implementing regulations or in any other aspect of the interpretation of Title IX in recent years 50 years. years before the courts, “he said.

In this February 7, 2019 file photo, Bloomfield High School transgender athlete Terry Miller, second from left, wins the 55-meter dashboard final over transgender athlete Andraya Yearwood, far left, and other runners in the Connecticut Girls Class S indoor circuit meet on Hillhouse High School in New Haven, Connecticut

In this February 7, 2019 file photo, Bloomfield High School transgender athlete Terry Miller, second from left, wins the 55-meter dashboard final over transgender athlete Andraya Yearwood, far left, and other runners in the Connecticut Girls Class S indoor circuit meet on Hillhouse High School in New Haven, Connecticut

In this February 7, 2019 file photo, Bloomfield High School transgender athlete Terry Miller, second from left, wins the 55-meter dashboard final over transgender athlete Andraya Yearwood, far left, and other runners in the Connecticut Girls Class S indoor circuit meet on Hillhouse High School in New Haven, Connecticut

The Hartford Courant reported that the students had no interaction before or after the race on Friday.

Mitchell laid down her victory on her own talent, not on the possible consequences of the lawsuit for the athletes involved.

“It’s absolutely big because I’ve never hit her before. I think it’s just exciting, “Mitchell said

“I’m just trying to erase everything from my mind, this is just a trace, you know, it’s just running, just focusing on myself, not trying to think about anything else that happened.”

Mitchell added that she doesn’t think her victory will affect the case.

“I don’t think it could go wrong, there are still tons of girls who lose every day,” Mitchell added.

Miller added about the defeat: “I clapped because I am not a hater for me. If you win, you win. And even if you don’t respect me, I will respect you. ”

Miller had comforted Yearwood before the race because she was disqualified due to a false start. “It’s very important to me because she didn’t get a coincidence, she was disappointed,” Miller said. “It’s not about victory, it’s about enjoying the sport.”

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