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Terry Mitropoulos was told that he would never walk again. He was started from a rehabilitation in a wheelchair after the allocated hours had run out. Mr Mitropoulos says that the system is broken

Terry Mitropoulos has been mentioned a lot since he was told he would never walk again.

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Amazing, inspiring, wonderful, brilliant.

He has never been called a quitter. No way, not how.

But while the 46-year-old & # 39; wonderman & # 39; walking from Adelaide to Melbourne, he can't help but think about how people stop him.

Terry Mitropoulos was told that he would never walk again. He was started from a rehabilitation in a wheelchair after the allocated hours had run out. Mr Mitropoulos says that the system is broken

Terry Mitropoulos was told that he would never walk again. He was started from a rehabilitation in a wheelchair after the allocated hours had run out. Mr Mitropoulos says that the system is broken

Terry Mitropoulos in rehabilitation. He left in a wheelchair after being told that he would never walk again. He ran within six weeks of being forced to take matters into his own hands

Terry Mitropoulos in rehabilitation. He left in a wheelchair after being told that he would never walk again. He ran within six weeks of being forced to take matters into his own hands

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Terry Mitropoulos in rehabilitation. He left in a wheelchair after being told that he would never walk again. He ran within six weeks of being forced to take matters into his own hands

If Mr. Mitropoulos followed the rules that the Australian health system told him to play, he would be lying flat on his back today with a nurse cleaning his bottom.

Much has been written and said about how the former Greek businessman came to walk through the country.

It is not a short story.

The shortened version goes something like this:

Nine years ago, Mr Mitropoulos was diagnosed with a brain tumor and had a five percent chance of survival.

The father of two underwent 13 brain surgeries and got 72 different types of medication pumped into his body.

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He caught a superug in the hospital that threatened to kill him.

When he became a guinea pig, it went from bad to terrible.

While the drug killed the insect, it broke his central nervous system and left him with a spinal cord injury.

Mr. Mitropoulos lost his memory, hearing, eyesight and doctors told him he would never walk again.

After four years on his back, they were comfortable with that prognosis.

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Mr. Mitropoulos was born in the suburb of Melbourne, Brunswick, where children are strong. He would never accept that he could not get better.

He remembers that it was yesterday – the day the Australian health system called him a lost cause.

He had just finished a new rehabilitation session when a nurse broke the news that his file had been checked and his allocated number of rehabilitation hours had expired.

Mr. Mitropoulos was only just over a year in rehabilitation when he received his marching orders.

Terry Mitropoulos was a complete wreck. Doctors had to open his brain 13 times. He developed a superug that threatened to kill him. The remedy turned out to hurt more than the bug

Terry Mitropoulos was a complete wreck. Doctors had to open his brain 13 times. He developed a superug that threatened to kill him. The remedy turned out to hurt more than the bug

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Terry Mitropoulos was a complete wreck. Doctors had to open his brain 13 times. He developed a superug that threatened to kill him. The remedy turned out to hurt more than the bug

Terry Mitropoulos says he may only have half a brain, but he is smart enough to know that the health system is not working properly. He tries to inspire people not to accept the fate that others place on them

Terry Mitropoulos says he may only have half a brain, but he is smart enough to know that the health system is not working properly. He tries to inspire people not to accept the fate that others place on them

Terry Mitropoulos says he may only have half a brain, but he is smart enough to know that the health system is not working properly. He tries to inspire people not to accept the fate that others place on them

Die Hard: Terry Mitropoulos was determined to improve herself. He would not go silent into the night. He would live on. He would be the best he could be

Die Hard: Terry Mitropoulos was determined to improve herself. He would not go silent into the night. He would live on. He would be the best he could be

Die Hard: Terry Mitropoulos was determined to improve herself. He would not go silent into the night. He would live on. He would be the best he could be

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While the staff were sympathetic, they told the destroyed father that their hands were tied.

& # 39; I was quite shocked and never knew after all that I was on a stopwatch & # 39 ;, Mr. Mitropoulos told Daily Mail Australia.

Nearly 200 km in his walk, the moment still touches what is left of some rough nerves in his body.

& # 39; I was very discouraged. Absolutely, I was really discouraged. If you are told that this is it and you are told that you will never walk again and you do your best to restore yourself – to be a father again and to be that loving husband, be that friend and even alone – for that to take away from you? & # 39; he said.

& # 39; Why would you do that? Why would you do that to a soul? You don't do things like that. Support the person – the person who really wants to make a difference in their lives. & # 39;

Mr. Mitropoulos said he could have understood if he had not started treatment and had given up the game.

& # 39; There are many who give you everything and they don't appreciate it. But there are others, like myself, that all I wanted to do was to get back what I could be as well as possible, & he said.

Mitropoulos was sent home in a wheelchair and was determined to surround himself with people who believed in him.

The old fighting fan watched a documentary about an Australian boxer when he was inspired by the strength and conditioning coach of the hunter.

Mr. Mitropoulos did his homework and compiled a list of potential coaches.

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One stuck out.

Ben Siong had himself & # 39; the master of strengthening and conditioning & # 39; called.

& # 39; I said, "I'm going to test your champion," said Mr. Mitropoulos.

When asked what he wanted from his training, Mr. Mitropoulos did not hesitate.

& # 39; I know I will no longer be who I once was. But what I do know is that I can improve myself & # 39 ;, he told the trainer. & # 39; How far, I don't know. But what I do know: I'm going to improve myself. & # 39;

Terry Mitropoulos before his world crumbled around him. A brain tumor cut him off and a superug almost killed him. But it was Australia's health system that nearly broke him
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Terry Mitropoulos before his world crumbled around him. A brain tumor cut him off and a superug almost killed him. But it was Australia's health system that nearly broke him

Terry Mitropoulos before his world crumbled around him. A brain tumor cut him off and a superug almost killed him. But it was Australia's health system that nearly broke him

Terry Mitropoulos and his trainer Ben Siong worked out their guts to make him walk again. Siong believed that the father of two could do it and started making it happen

Terry Mitropoulos and his trainer Ben Siong worked out their guts to make him walk again. Siong believed that the father of two could do it and started making it happen

Terry Mitropoulos and his trainer Ben Siong worked out their guts to make him walk again. Siong believed that the father of two could do it and started making it happen

Terry Mitropoulos struggled to get better. But he always intended to get better. He says that the system that banned him from rehabilitation is managed by the book,

Terry Mitropoulos struggled to get better. But he always intended to get better. He says that the system that banned him from rehabilitation is managed by the book,

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Terry Mitropoulos struggled to get better. But he always intended to get better. He says that the system that banned him from rehabilitation is managed by the book,

Unlike the rehabilitation he included under the & # 39; stopwatch & # 39; Mr. Mitropoulos said that Siong could feel his hunger & # 39 ;.

& # 39; He believed in me to the point that I believed in him. That was what I was looking for, & said Mr. Mitropoulos.

The pair started with extensive training – hard core training that pushed Mr. Mitropoulos to the limit.

In less than two months, Mr. Mitropoulos walked around with nothing more than a stick.

Looking back, Mr. Mitropoulos is certain that he would never have walked again if he hadn't been booted from the rehab by the Australian government.

& # 39; Absolutely not. And that's sad. It's very sad, & he said.

That is precisely why Mr Mitropoulos runs more than 700 km from Adelaide to Melbourne.

& # 39; To show the people, you just don't admit it. If someone tells you that you will never walk again, this does not mean that you will never walk again, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; You can find a way to walk. You can find a way to improve yourself in a way that makes you feel comfortable with yourself.

& # 39; From as low as you can be, from as dark as you can be, look at the light that I have been able to shine not only at myself, but at others. This is an example of the power of each other, because without each other we have nothing, but if we work together, we can achieve from the impossible to the possible. & # 39;

Terry Mitropoulos leaves Adelaide during his long walk to Melbourne. He defied the opportunities and now inspires others to follow his leadership

Terry Mitropoulos leaves Adelaide during his long walk to Melbourne. He defied the opportunities and now inspires others to follow his leadership

Terry Mitropoulos leaves Adelaide during his long walk to Melbourne. He defied the opportunities and now inspires others to follow his leadership

Terry Mitropoulos gets a helping hand during his long journey. He has received many helping hands during the trip and believes that people can make a difference together

Terry Mitropoulos gets a helping hand during his long journey. He has received many helping hands during the trip and believes that people can make a difference together

Terry Mitropoulos gets a helping hand during his long journey. He has received many helping hands during the trip and believes that people can make a difference together

Mr. Mitropoulos now inspires others to restore their confidence while being trapped in a health system that often throws them at the scrap heap.

He has already helped a man stuck in a nursing home without arms and legs to walk again after one phone call.

& # 39; I have half a brain. My brain has been opened 13 times. My mental status is far from the average person. My IQ is nothing. But I had just enough to do some research, some homework for this person, and from that one phone call I found this beautiful lady who did this for him, & he said.

& # 39; And this is the rehabilitation system that had all the means to catch him for his legs, but no, stupid Terry without a brain made one phone call and now he has two prosthetic legs and he can just walk around where he needs to & # 39;

Mr. Mitropoulos said the system was broken.

& # 39; They are guided by a book. And when you are dealing with humanity, you do not follow books. You follow what you see … because your needs can be so different from what the book says. If you follow the book, what they do, man, it only gives you the alphabet. & # 39;

All the money that Mr Mitropoulos raised during his walk goes to the YMCA and the Black Dog Institute, which helps with the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mood disorders such as depression and bipolar disorder.

A GoFundMe page has been determined.

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