Heritage bosses are trying to turn Hadrian’s Wall into a tourist hotspot with a cash injection of £ 30 million

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Heritage bosses want to turn Hadrian’s Wall into a tourist hotspot to rival the Great Wall of China with a £ 30 million cash injection that will show how it inspired Game of Thrones

  • Hadrian’s Wall will receive a £ 30 million cash injection to improve and maintain the site
  • Plans to make the wall an attraction similar to the Great Wall of China
  • Heritage bosses plan to catapult the site to the top ten attractions in the UK
  • They plan to use links with Game of Thrones’ ‘Wall of Ice’ to increase attendance

Heritage bosses plan to make Hadrian’s Wall an attraction similar to the Great Wall of China with a cash injection of £ 30 million.

The money will be used to show how it inspired Game of Thrones’ 345 mile long and 700 foot high ‘Wall of Ice’.

With an initial target of three million visitors a year, Hadrian’s Wall would be catapulted to the top ten attractions in the UK and become the number one spot for locations outside the capital.

Hadrian's Wall gets a £ 30m boost from government and charity funds to put the attraction in the top ten in the country

Hadrian’s Wall gets a £ 30m boost from government and charity funds to put the attraction in the top ten in the country

Inspired by Game of Thrones' 345-mile-long and 700-foot-high 'Wall of Ice' (pictured), an ode to the Roman monument, heritage bosses plan to make the wall an attraction similar to the Great Wall of China

Inspired by Game of Thrones' 345-mile-long and 700-foot-high 'Wall of Ice' (pictured), an ode to the Roman monument, heritage bosses plan to make the wall an attraction similar to the Great Wall of China

Inspired by Game of Thrones’ 345-mile-long and 700-foot-high ‘Wall of Ice’ (pictured), an ode to the Roman monument, heritage bosses plan to make the wall an attraction similar to the Great Wall of China

The Hadrian’s Wall partnership board plans to leverage all possible ties to the Games of Thrones franchise, due to its popularity, and wants to involve the show’s creator, George RR Martin, in the process.

Chairman Lady Gibson said Sunday Times: “We will explore every possible storytelling hook to introduce people around the world to the wall and its historical significance, including the use of Game of Thrones.”

Martin, 72, was first inspired by the Roman monument on a visit in 1981. He told Rolling Stone magazine: ‘I got up there and tried to imagine what it was like to be a Roman legionnaire standing on this wall, looking at these distant hills,

‘It was a very deep feeling. For the Romans at the time, this was the end of civilization; it was the end of the world. ‘

Martin told the publication that he imagined monsters hiding in the dark Scottish highlands and that the wall felt like a “barrier” against dark forces.

Hadrian's Wall's partnership board plans to leverage every possible angle with the Games of Thrones franchise, due to its popularity (photo, a scene from series 8)

Hadrian's Wall's partnership board plans to leverage every possible angle of ties to the Games of Thrones franchise, due to its popularity (pictured, a scene from series 8)

Hadrian’s Wall’s partnership board plans to leverage every possible angle with the Games of Thrones franchise, due to its popularity (photo, a scene from series 8)

The History of Hadrian’s Wall

Hadrian’s Wall was built between AD 122 and 128 along the northwestern border of the Roman Empire.

Its construction was ordered by Emperor Hadrian, who ascended the throne in AD 117.

It took six years and about 15,000 men to build and stretches for 73 miles from Newcastle upon Tyne in the east and Bowness-on-Solway in the west.

On every Roman mile a small fortified gate had been built to house between 20 and 30 men stationed as guards.

Only 10 percent of the wall remains, as much of it has been moved or buried.

Although a common misconception, the wall does not mark the boundary between Scotland and England.

Heritage bosses plan to use the money injection to improve transport links to the wall and upgrade the visitor centers in an effort to attract more tourists.

The money comes from the Hadrian’s Wall Partnership Council, which is putting £ 12m into the project, with the remaining £ 18m coming from the Scottish and British governments.

The public money comes from their joint £ 350 million Borderlands Growth Deal, a 2021 initiative to promote sustainable and inclusive economic growth in border regions.

One of the UK’s 32 World Heritage Sites, the wall spans 73 miles across England from Newcastle upon Tyne in the east to Bowness-on-Solway in the west.

It was built by the Romans around 122 AD to guard the northwestern border of their empire and features several surviving fortresses, towers and turrets, although much of it has been moved or buried.

The colossal monument has seen a year of low visitor numbers, putting it in its best condition since the end of World War II, according to WallCAP archaeologists.

The number of sites along the wall currently listed as “ at risk ” is number 19, but after a year of lockdowns, leaving plenty of time for conservation work, archaeologists hope this figure can drop to 12.

English Heritage, which manages the wall, has invested more than £ 100,000 in repairing high-risk areas.

One of the UK's 32 World Heritage Sites, the wall spans 73 miles across England from Newcastle upon Tyne in the east to Bowness-on-Solway in the west.

One of the UK's 32 World Heritage Sites, the wall spans 73 miles across England from Newcastle upon Tyne in the east to Bowness-on-Solway in the west.

One of the UK’s 32 World Heritage Sites, the wall spans 73 miles across England from Newcastle upon Tyne in the east to Bowness-on-Solway in the west.

The wall was built by the Romans around AD 122 to guard the northwestern border of their empire and features several surviving fortresses, towers and turrets

The wall was built by the Romans around AD 122 to guard the northwestern border of their empire and features several surviving fortresses, towers and turrets

The wall was built by the Romans around AD 122 to guard the northwestern border of their empire and features several surviving fortresses, towers and turrets

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