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A helicopter pilot who has spent nearly a decade rescuing injured tourists from Uluru has talked about the impending climbing ban that will take effect from October 26

& # 39; Bones got stuck & # 39 ;: Helicopter pilot shares horrifying anecdotes from Uluru rescue missions and explains why controversial climb SHOULD be banned

  • Helicopter pilot who saved tourists from Uluru has talked about a climbing ban
  • Dan O & # 39; Dwyer spent nearly ten years making sightseeing flights and rescuing the injured
  • Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park prohibits climbing from October 26 this year
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A helicopter pilot who saved injured tourists from Uluru for almost ten years has spoken of the impending climbing ban that will come into effect from October 26.

Dan O & # 39; Dwyer grew up in Alice Springs and worked between 1998 and 2005 as a travel and rescue pilot for Professional Helicopter Services in the area.

In addition to taking tourists on flights around the rock, he was also one of only a dozen pilots who ever landed on the rock to bring injured tourists to safety.

A helicopter pilot who has spent nearly a decade rescuing injured tourists from Uluru has talked about the impending climbing ban that will take effect from October 26

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A helicopter pilot who has spent nearly a decade rescuing injured tourists from Uluru has talked about the impending climbing ban that will take effect from October 26

Dan O & # 39; Dwyer (photo) grew up in Alice Springs and worked as a travel and rescue pilot for Professional Helicopter Services in the area between 1998 and 2005.

Dan O & # 39; Dwyer (photo) grew up in Alice Springs and worked as a travel and rescue pilot for Professional Helicopter Services in the area between 1998 and 2005.

Dan O & # 39; Dwyer (photo) grew up in Alice Springs and worked as a travel and rescue pilot for Professional Helicopter Services in the area between 1998 and 2005.

The popular tourist destination in the Northern Territory attracts thousands of visitors every month

The popular tourist destination in the Northern Territory attracts thousands of visitors every month

The popular tourist destination in the Northern Territory attracts thousands of visitors every month

Mr O & # 39; Dwyer said the worst injury he ever encountered was a woman who had broken her leg so badly that the bone had broken through the skin.

She was blown over by a strong gust of wind, which made her fall awkwardly.

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& # 39; People used to stand between (small boulders on top of the rock) to prevent them from being blown down, & # 39; Mr. O & # 39; Dwyer explained to the ABC.

& # 39; A certain woman had her legs clamped in it and then she was blown over and broke one of her legs. When we got there, she was remarkably calm, considering the bones that protruded through her leg. & # 39;

Mr O & # 39; Dwyer also remembers a woman who had heart palpitations at the top of the climb.

The woman was over 130 pounds and was on a long list of medicines, some of which were experimental.

She was just one of many people who should never have tried the climb, Mr O & # 39; Dwyer added.

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The pilot said he was one of only 10 to 15 people who landed on Uluru, adding the view is very special.

Tourists are not allowed to climb Uluru from October 26 this year (photo; the view from the top)

Tourists are not allowed to climb Uluru from October 26 this year (photo; the view from the top)

Tourists are not allowed to climb Uluru from October 26 this year (photo; the view from the top)

He explained that the wind makes the landing pretty dangerous, so that the pilots developed a technique to approach through a crosswind so that updrafts or downdrafts would not make the helicopter unstable.

While working in the area, he said he spoke to many local Anangu people who expressed the fact that they do not like people climbing on the rock.

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He said that although he was never asked not to climb Uluru, he decided out of respect that the site is sacred to them.

& # 39; By making those salvations, I worked with some local Anangu people and it was pretty clear to me that it is a pretty sacred area for them, & # 39; he said.

The ban on climbing the rock was announced by the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park in 2017 and will enter into force on October 26.

A sign has already been placed at the foot of the climb asking if tourists would like to respect traditional owners so as not to climb the rock.

Wind makes lands quite dangerous, so the pilots developed a technique to approach through a crosswind, so that updrafts or downdrafts would not make the helicopter unstable (file image)

Wind makes lands quite dangerous, so the pilots developed a technique to approach through a crosswind, so that updrafts or downdrafts would not make the helicopter unstable (file image)

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Wind makes lands quite dangerous, so the pilots developed a technique to approach through a crosswind, so that updrafts or downdrafts would not make the helicopter unstable (file image)

A sign has already been placed at the foot of the climb asking if tourists would like to respect the traditional owners not to climb the rock

A sign has already been placed at the foot of the climb asking if tourists would like to respect the traditional owners not to climb the rock

A sign has already been placed at the foot of the climb asking if tourists would like to respect the traditional owners not to climb the rock

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