Heartwarming moment when two brothers, separated by the divorce of India in 1947, are reunited after 74 YEARS

This is the heartwarming moment when two brothers separated by the partition of India in 1947 are reunited after 74 years apart.

Muhammad Siddique and Habib, aka Shela, who are both believed to be in their eighties, were separated in 1947 when British rule ended in India and it was divided into two independent regions – India and Pakistan.

At least 20 million people were displaced during the largest mass migration in human history in 1947, while visas between India and Pakistan have been difficult to obtain ever since.

But the two brothers were reunited in Kartarpur, Pakistan, after Habib traveled from the Phullanwal area of ​​India’s Punjab to meet his younger brother Saddiq, who lives in Faisalabad, Pakistan. Local media reported.

Heartwarming footage shows the moment the two men saw each other in the Kartarpur Corridor – a visa-free border crossing between the two countries that opened in 2019.

Muhammad Siddique and Habib aka Shela, who are both believed to be in their eighties, were separated after the partition of India in 1947 before being reunited 74 years later.

Muhammad Siddique and Habib aka Shela, who are both believed to be in their eighties, were separated after the partition of India in 1947 before being reunited 74 years later.

Heartwarming footage (above) shows the moment the men were reunited in the Kartarpur Corridor - a visa-free border crossing between India and Pakistan that opened in 2019

Heartwarming footage (above) shows the moment the men were reunited in the Kartarpur Corridor - a visa-free border crossing between India and Pakistan that opened in 2019

Heartwarming footage (above) shows the moment the men were reunited in the Kartarpur Corridor – a visa-free border crossing between India and Pakistan that opened in 2019

In the clip, the two brothers walk towards each other before bursting into tears of joy as they wrap their arms around each other in a tight embrace.

As they hold each other, one of the brothers says, “Don’t cry, don’t worry, we’re finally reunited after all these years, don’t cry.”

The brothers both wipe tears from their eyes when they are finally reunited, with the emotional moment seeming to overwhelm them.

After reconnecting with his brother, Habib praised the Kartarpur Corridor for helping reunite families that had been separated for years, according to local media reports.

The brothers were separated during the partition of India in 1947, with Habib growing up on the Indian side of the divide, while Saddiq lived on the Pakistani side.

India’s Independence Act in 1947 ended 200 years of British rule and saw the nation divided into Hindu-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan amid religious strife.

In the clip, the two brothers walk towards each other before bursting into tears of joy as they wrap their arms around each other in a tight embrace.

In the clip, the two brothers walk towards each other before bursting into tears of joy as they wrap their arms around each other in a tight embrace.

In the clip, the two brothers walk towards each other before bursting into tears of joy as they wrap their arms around each other in a tight embrace.

As they hold each other, one of the brothers says, 'Don't cry, don't worry, we're finally reunited after all these years, don't cry'

As they hold each other, one of the brothers says, 'Don't cry, don't worry, we're finally reunited after all these years, don't cry'

As they hold each other, one of the brothers says, ‘Don’t cry, don’t worry, we’re finally reunited after all these years, don’t cry’

But the brothers were reunited through the Kartarpur Corridor, a deal between Islamabad and New Delhi that opened a visa-free corridor between the two countries in 2019.

Visas to travel between Pakistan and India are normally difficult to obtain, but the corridor has been put in place to make this possible Sikh pilgrims in India to visit the shrine of the founder of their religion, which is located in Pakistan.

Sikhs from all over the world, Indian pilgrims of all faiths and people of Indian descent can use the corridor, said SCL Das, a joint secretary of the Indian Ministry of Home Affairs at the time.

WHAT IS INDIA 1947 PARTITION?

The Partition of India was when British India split in 1947 to form the states of India and Pakistan after a clash in religious values.

It marked the end of Britain’s colonial power over the country as two new nations were formed: Hindu and Sikh-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan.

Bangladesh later seceded from Pakistan in 1971, with the devastating effects causing an estimated death toll of between 200,000 and two million.

Muslims, 25% of the population of British India, enjoyed a protected status as a minority government under imperial rule, and many were concerned that this would end with the partition.

What followed was the largest mass migration in human history, along with sexual violence, mutilation, torture and kidnapping.

70 years later, the effects of the Partition still hang over the two nations, thanks to the lingering threat of nuclear conflict.

The deal creates a secure bridge between the two countries, leading directly to the tomb of Sikhism’s founder Guru Nanak, which is just 4 km (two miles) from the Indian border.

Indians were temporarily unable to cross the road in 2020 due to the Covid-19 pandemic, but authorities agreed to reopen the corridor in 2021.

India had long asked Pakistan for such a corridor, but the project was hindered by years of diplomatic tensions between the two countries, which have fought three wars since the partition of the Indian subcontinent in 1947.

When Pakistan was carved out of colonial India at the end of British colonial rule in 1947, Kartarpur ended up on the western side of the border, while most Sikhs in the region remained on the other side.

Since then, the perpetual state of enmity between India and Pakistan, which have had numerous border battles since independence, has been a constant barrier, especially for Sikhs wishing to visit the temple.

After the hallway was opened, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi said: “I would like to thank the Prime Minister of Pakistan Imran Khan for respecting India’s feelings. I thank him for his cooperation.’

The Indian Independence Act, which formed the two independent nations of India and Pakistan, came into effect at midnight on August 15, 1947, ending 200 years of British rule in the country.

Religious strife between Hindus and Muslims in India caused the country to be divided into two nations, forming a Hindu-majority India and a Muslim-majority Pakistan.

It led to the largest mass migration in human history, as the partition left millions of Muslims in Hindu-dominated India and Hindus in Islamic Pakistan, forcing families fearing repression to travel across the border.

Independence and partition resulted in the deaths of at least a million people and saw up to 20 million displaced as Muslims fled to Pakistan and Hindus and Sikhs moved to India.

There were an estimated 20,000 Sikhs left in Pakistan after millions fled to India following the bloody religious violence ignited by the partition.

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