Ultimate magazine theme for WordPress.

Heart-warming moment boy, two, plays for the first time in the mud after a long drought

After months of terrible drought-stricken communities throughout Australia, a few have been blessed with a little rain.

But it seemed that nobody enjoyed it as much as the two-year-old Archie Saunders, who seized the opportunity to play with his father in the mud for the first time.

Heart-warming photos show the excited toddler grinning and giggling while having fun outside with his father Nick outside their home in Uralla, New South Wales.

Nick Saunders (photo) is holding his two year old son Archie while they play together in the mud while the drought-stricken area finally got some rain

Nick Saunders (photo) is holding his two year old son Archie while they play together in the mud while the drought-stricken area finally got some rain

Kleine Archie (photo) splashed in the mud with his father outside their house in the north of NSW

Kleine Archie (photo) splashed in the mud with his father outside their house in the north of NSW

Kleine Archie (photo) splashed in the mud with his father outside their house in the north of NSW

The father and son share a tender kiss (photo) on heart-warming photos made by Archie's mother Nkala Forest

The father and son share a tender kiss (photo) on heart-warming photos made by Archie's mother Nkala Forest

The father and son share a tender kiss (photo) on heart-warming photos made by Archie’s mother Nkala Forest

Nick Saunders happily plays with his son and seems to take a tumble in the mud (photo), while enjoying the first rain in months

Nick Saunders happily plays with his son and seems to take a tumble in the mud (photo), while enjoying the first rain in months

Nick Saunders happily plays with his son and seems to take a tumble in the mud (photo), while enjoying the first rain in months

Speaking with Daily Mail Australia, little Archie’s mother, Nkala Frost, explained that they had not seen rain in months.

And although at first he wasn’t sure what it was, the happy little boy soon enjoyed playing in the mud with his father.

“Our son has only seen rain a few times, and he absolutely loved getting down and dirty when he realized what it was,” she said.

“Everyone in the New England region is suffering in one way or another. We were just so happy that our nice little pictures brought so many smiles to our good friends, family and now many other people through the news or social media. “

Archie Saunders, 2, (photo) enjoys a belly flop in the mud, much to the delight of his father Nick

Archie Saunders, 2, (photo) enjoys a belly flop in the mud, much to the delight of his father Nick

Archie Saunders, 2, (photo) enjoys a belly flop in the mud, much to the delight of his father Nick

The two happily played in the mud when Archie's mother Nkala took the heart-warming photos after the area drought for months

The two happily played in the mud when Archie's mother Nkala took the heart-warming photos after the area drought for months

The two happily played in the mud when Archie’s mother Nkala took the heart-warming photos after the area drought for months

Their city is so badly hit by drought that little Archie (photo) initially did not even know what rain was

Their city is so badly hit by drought that little Archie (photo) initially did not even know what rain was

Their city is so badly hit by drought that little Archie (photo) initially did not even know what rain was

Little Archie (photo) is being held by his father Nick Saunders as they splash around in the mud outside their house in the north of NSW

Little Archie (photo) is being held by his father Nick Saunders as they splash around in the mud outside their house in the north of NSW

Little Archie (photo) is being held by his father Nick Saunders as they splash around in the mud outside their house in the north of NSW

Mrs. Frost said the heartwarming photos were a timely reminder that communities should support each other in difficult times.

“We love nothing more than making people smile and laugh,” she said.

“In such difficult times we have to stay together and hope and pray for rain.

‘There are many others who are much worse off than we are, who need more rain than we do.

“But we will take what we can get. Every rain is good rain.

“And we pray for all farmers suffering from drought or forest fires that things will disappear soon.”

Although she was not familiar with rain, Archie (photo) wasted no time getting stuck in the wet and muddy game

Although she was not familiar with rain, Archie (photo) wasted no time getting stuck in the wet and muddy game

Although she was not familiar with rain, Archie (photo) wasted no time getting stuck in the wet and muddy game

Archie (photo) was fascinated by mud and rain and greatly enjoyed playing outside with his father

Archie (photo) was fascinated by mud and rain and greatly enjoyed playing outside with his father

Archie (photo) was fascinated by mud and rain and greatly enjoyed playing outside with his father

Archie's father Nick Saunders (photo) came into his mind when after months of drought he played with his two-year-old son in the rain

Archie's father Nick Saunders (photo) came into his mind when after months of drought he played with his two-year-old son in the rain

Archie’s father Nick Saunders (photo) came into his mind when after months of drought he played with his two-year-old son in the rain

Earlier this week, the Bureau of Meteorology revealed that 2019 was the driest and most popular in Australia.

More and more savage bushfire seasons that are destroying homes, claiming lives and scratching animals in the Australian landscape are threatening to make the new normal.

And this year’s bushfire season has only become more difficult thanks to drought-stricken areas across the country.

“The climate in Australia is warming up,” Dr. said. Karl Braganza, head of climate monitoring at the Executive Board.

‘We get certain weather conditions, in particular heat waves and fire, they are becoming more frequent and more extreme.

“That information really goes to those who are responsible for climate risk management.”

Crop farmers, such as this man in Parkes, NSW, (photo) suffer from months of drought

Crop farmers, such as this man in Parkes, NSW, (photo) suffer from months of drought

Crop farmers, such as this man in Parkes, NSW, (photo) suffer from months of drought

Rural communities in NSW, such as the one in Broken Hill (photo), have suffered a terrible drought

Rural communities in NSW, such as the one in Broken Hill (photo), have suffered a terrible drought

Rural communities in NSW, such as the one in Broken Hill (photo), have suffered a terrible drought

.