Heart-warming moment, a nurse nestled a five-year-old boy who recovered from tonsil surgery

When five-year-old Slade Thompson awoke from the operating room to have his tonsils removed, he was in pain and cried.

The little boy from Renovo, Pennsylvania, wanted to see his mother, but she wasn't allowed in the room yet until his vital properties were checked.

So Slade asked one of his nurses, Annie Hager, if she would cuddle with him. She immediately said yes and crawled into bed with him and gave him a big hug.

The sweet moment was captured on camera and has been torn over thousands of times on social media.

Slade Thompson, five, from Renovo, Pennsylvania, woke up last month after his almond surgery and cried for his mother

He asked one of his nurses, Annie Hager, 35 if she would settle comfortably with him

He asked one of his nurses, Annie Hager, 35 if she would settle comfortably with him

Slade Thompson, five, from Renovo, Pennsylvania, woke up last month after his almond surgery and cried for his mother. He asked one of his nurses, Annie Hager, 35 if she would settle comfortably with him. Pictured, left and right: Slade with Hager

Hager hugged Slade (photo) for five to ten minutes until he fell asleep, and then & # 39; s mother was allowed to enter the room

Hager hugged Slade (photo) for five to ten minutes until he fell asleep, and then & # 39; s mother was allowed to enter the room

Hager hugged Slade (photo) for five to ten minutes until he fell asleep, and then & # 39; s mother was allowed to enter the room

Slade and his mother, Layla Thompson, are no strangers to hospitals, but they can still be scary places for five-year-olds.

Thompson, told DailyMail.com that her son has been visiting different hospitals and doctors since the age of two because of an unrelated medical condition.

As a toddler, Slade began to walk on his toes instead of dropping his entire foot to the ground.

& # 39; It was a full-fledged toes of ballerina & # 39; s, & # 39; said Thompson. & # 39; He came to the point where he could not put his heels on the ground. & # 39;

Doctors discovered that he had a very tight Achilles tendon, so in January 2019, surgeons at the Philadelphia Children's Hospital extended the tendons in both legs.

Slade spent two months in a wheelchair and, according to Thompson, had to learn how to walk & heels, how to walk & # 39 ;.

Then, on April 18, Slade was admitted to the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center Susquehanna for a tonsillectomy, a procedure to remove the tonsils, for breathing problems.

The tonsils are two small glands at the back of the throat that help prevent viruses and bacteria from entering the nose and throat.

Currently, about 20 percent of removals are for infection and 80 percent for obstructive sleep problems, according to the American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery.

A full recovery usually takes between 10 days and two weeks.

Thompson and her fiancé were in the waiting room when Slade woke up, but before they could see him, his nurses had to check his vitality.

& # 39; Children are generally scared when they wake up from surgery, they are in pain and Slade wanted to see his mother, & # 39; Hager, the nurse, told DailyMail.com.

& # 39; I said to him: & # 39; It's gonna be okay, Mom will be here soon. & # 39; He said, "I really want to lie down, do you want to be nice with me?" and I said, "Of course I will." & # 39;

The photo is shared on Facebook and has more than 5,100 likes and more than 630 shares. Pictured: Slade in wheelchair after surgery in January 2019

The photo is shared on Facebook and has more than 5,100 likes and more than 630 shares. Pictured: Slade in wheelchair after surgery in January 2019

The photo is shared on Facebook and has more than 5,100 likes and more than 630 shares. Pictured: Slade in wheelchair after surgery in January 2019

At a follow-up appointment a few days later, Slade brought flowers to Hager (photo)

At a follow-up appointment a few days later, Slade brought flowers to Hager (photo)

Hager and Slade's mother have become friends and plan to bring their children together in the summer. Pictured: Slade in the hospital

Hager and Slade's mother have become friends and plan to bring their children together in the summer. Pictured: Slade in the hospital

At a follow-up appointment, a few days later, Slade brought flowers to Hager. She and Slade's mother have become friends and plan to bring their children together in the summer. Pictured: Slade brings flowers to Hager, left and in the hosptial, to the right

So Hager climbed into bed with Slade and held him for about five to ten minutes, during which time he fell asleep, and then Thompson peeked around the corner.

& # 39; I immediately knew she had to be a mother, & # 39; said Thompson, and Hager actually has two own children.

& # 39; I turned the corner and he slept. And I said, "Can I take your picture?" Slade must have heard my voice, because then he woke up. & # 39;

The photo, along with another from Slade and Hager, is shared on Facebook, where it has more than 5,100 likes and more than 630 shares.

& # 39; None of us expected us to receive this response, & # 39; said Hager. & # 39; It is just heartwarming to be there for the children. Kindness is free, so why not give up? & # 39;

At a follow-up appointment a few days later, Slade and his mother brought flowers – which the boy chose himself – to & # 39; his Miss Annie & # 39 ;.

& # 39; He gave me a big hug and I just started crying, & # 39; said Hager.

Hager and Thompson have developed a friendship and plan to bring their children together in the summer.

& # 39; Nurses, they are paid to care for you, not to care for you, & # 39; said Thompson.

& # 39;[Hager]was paid to take his vitality, not to hold him. She could have just said, "No, Mom's coming." But she didn't. She comforted him. & # 39;

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