Home Health ‘Health ITV’ will be carried out on fragile patients at hospital emergency entrances

‘Health ITV’ will be carried out on fragile patients at hospital emergency entrances

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The move is expected to allow more patients to be assessed, treated and discharged on the same day, avoiding the need for an overnight stay.

Elderly and frail patients will undergo “health MOTs” at the entrance to emergency departments to avoid unnecessary hospital admissions.

This approach could be a “lifesaver” for many patients and would allow them to be assessed and supported more quickly, according to NHS England chief executive Amanda Pritchard.

The approach, which will be outlined today in his speech at the NHS ConfedExpo conference in Manchester, will focus on patients aged over 65 or those with frailty-related conditions.

Mrs Pritchard is expected to say: “With increasing demand for care, it is vital that we continue to adapt our services to meet the growing and changing needs of patients, which is why, as part of our Urgent Care Recovery Plan and Emergency, We have called on NHS hospitals to introduce practical measures to ensure older people receive the care and support they need.’

NHS England estimates that around one million people aged over 75 are admitted to hospital each year, a fifth of whom are very frail.

The move is expected to allow more patients to be assessed, treated and discharged on the same day, avoiding the need for an overnight stay.

The tests, which will be performed for 10 hours a day, seven days a week, will monitor blood pressure, heart health and mobility, as well as detect malnutrition.

NHS staff will also examine the patient’s respiratory and falls records.

Depending on the results, patients will be directed to receive specialized care, such as falls services and dementia support.

The move is expected to allow more patients to be assessed, treated and discharged on the same day, avoiding the need for an overnight stay.

Mrs Pritchard added: “Although some people need to be admitted, it is not always the most suitable place for older patients’ needs, and they can also quickly lose mobility while in hospital.”

Health MOTs at the front door of A&E for older people could be a lifesaver for many people: from blood pressure tests to a review of their history of falls, these checks mean patients can be quickly assessed and directed to the appropriate support for your needs.

Half of frail elderly patients admitted experience functional decline between admission and discharge, and up to 50 percent of older people may develop incontinence within 48 hours of admission.

In the first week in the hospital, patients may see their muscle strength reduced by up to 10 percent and their circulation reduced by up to 25 percent.

Sir Julian Hartley, chief executive of NHS Providers, which represents NHS trusts, said: “Half of hospitalized patients aged over 65 are affected by frailty and the growing number of people with frailty will have a significant impact on the future health and care services”.

‘Community health services are spearheading innovative care for people with frailty, supporting them to stay well in their own homes, and some trusts already provide home-based frailty services within hospitals.

“But too many frail people who need integrated, well-planned care are still not receiving the support they need.

“National policymakers must support trusts and local health system partners with more investment and resources in the community to ensure patients can receive the right care at the right time and in the right place.”

Pritchard is also expected to outline additional support for patients admitted to hospital in a bid to help prevent their deterioration.

Hospitals across the country are already trying to address this deconditioning, preventing harm to patients and improving their outcomes, all while having fun.

Examples include chair exercises such as yoga, “race track” routes in wards, static pedals for patients receiving dialysis, or pedometers in care homes for residents to take virtual walks along the coast.

NHS England’s Urgent and Emergency Care Recovery Plan published last month includes cash incentives for hospitals that do not leave patients waiting in A&E for 12 hours or more.

The NHS will also expand the use of virtual rooms in a bid to free up space in emergency departments.

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