Health expert warns US ‘must do something dramatic’ to stop the spread of COVID-19

COVID-19 cases are rapidly increasing across the country as the Indian ‘Delta’ variant continues to spread.

On Thursday, the US registered 28,412 new cases with a seven-day moving average of 26,079, up 135 percent from the average of 11,067 two weeks ago.

Nearly every state and the District of Columbia have seen infections rise in the past week, according to a DailyMail.com analysis of Johns Hopkins data.

In addition, about 40 states have seen their infection rates rise by at least 50 percent, with some of the biggest increases in hot spots like Arkansas, Louisiana and Missouri.

The White House also said on Friday that Florida is responsible for one in five cases of COVID-19 this week.

Officials blame a mix of low vaccination coverage and the spread of the Delta variant, which now accounts for about 60 percent of all new cases, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

With cases doubling every two weeks, that means the US could see 50,000 cases per day by the end of July and 100,000 per day by the end of the month.

Even if deaths are a lagging indicator, the number of vaccine fatalities is unlikely to rise as quickly or as quickly.

It comes as CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said the COVID-19 outbreak in the US is becoming “an unvaccinated pandemic.”

She said most coronavirus cases, hospitalizations and deaths now occur in people who have not yet received two injections of the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine or the one-time Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

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The US registered 28,412 new cases with a seven-day moving average of 26,079, a 135% increase from the average of 11,067 recorded two weeks ago

With cases doubling every two weeks, that means the US could see 50,000 cases per day by the end of July and 100,000 per day by the end of the month.

With cases doubling every two weeks, that means the US could see 50,000 cases per day by the end of July and 100,000 per day by the end of the month.

Nearly every state and the District of Columbia have seen infections rise in the past week

Nearly every state and the District of Columbia have seen infections rise in the past week

CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said the virus is becoming an

CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said the virus is becoming an “unvaccinated pandemic” at a news conference on Friday

Missouri remains one of the country’s COVID-19 epicenters, with an average increase of 83 percent from 1,029 per day to 1,892 per day in the past two weeks.

Unsurprisingly, the state’s vaccination rate is behind the national average: 46 percent of residents have received at least one dose, and 40 percent have been fully vaccinated.

In comparison, 55.8 percent of the US has received at least one dose and 48.3 percent is fully vaccinated.

dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, recently admitted that the federal health service is more concerned about Missouri than any other state.

“Looking at the map, Missouri stands out as the place I’m most concerned about because now a lot of cases are happening very quickly,” he said. McClatchy.

“The odds of getting infected in Missouri become very high and that means potentially serious illness or even death.”

The outbreak is caused by the Delta variant, which accounts for more than 97 percent of cases in the state, especially as wildfire in the Southwest.

Missouri remains one of the nation's COVID-19 epicenters, with an 83% average increase from 1,029 per day to 1,892 per day in the past two weeks

Missouri remains one of the nation’s COVID-19 epicenters, with an 83% average increase from 1,029 per day to 1,892 per day in the past two weeks

In nearby Arkansas, cases rose from an average of 515 per day two weeks ago to 1,444 per day on Thursday, an increase of 185%

In nearby Arkansas, cases rose from an average of 515 per day two weeks ago to 1,444 per day on Thursday, an increase of 185%

In Louisiana, the number of COVID-19 cases has increased by 466% from 299 per day to 1,695 per day in the past 14 days

In Louisiana, the number of COVID-19 cases has increased by 466% from 299 per day to 1,695 per day in the past 14 days

In Springfield, the two hospitals, CoxHealth and Mercy Springfield, are currently treating more COVID-19 patients than ever during the pandemic.

CoxHealth says 16 patients have died in the past week alone. .

“We went from virtually zero patients to about 100 patients in about seven months in the first few waves, and in this wave we went from, at least at Cox, about 14 patients seven weeks ago to about 130 today,” CoxHealth CEO Steve Edwards said at a press conference on Wednesday.

“So the lead time has been accelerated, almost tripled.”

In nearby Arkansas, cases rose from an average of 515 a day two weeks ago to 1,444 a day on Thursday, an increase of 185 percent, the DailyMail.com analysis shows.

According to Dr. University of Arkansas Chancellor of Medical Sciences Cam Patterson, only 35.1 percent of the population is fully vaccinated as a double infection every 10 days.

Arkansas Gov Asa Hutchinson (R) has begged residents to get vaccinated and attended community events across the state in an effort to increase vaccination rates.

Meanwhile, the chairman of the Democratic Party of Arkansas said he believes the mask mandate should be reinstated due to the spate of cases.

“Yeah, it was a bad idea,” Michael told John Gray KATV referring to a March law restricting the return of mask mandates.

“I don’t like it, I don’t like things to grind to a halt, I don’t like capacity, but if that’s what we have to do to make sure we’re all year round by this time next year.”

In nearby Louisiana, cases are up 466 percent in the past 14 days from 299 per day to 1,695 per day.

dr. Frank Courmier, the medical director for pulmonary and critical services at Our Lady of Lourdes Regional Medical Center in Lafayette, told CNN that the COVID-19 patients admitted to his hospital are between the ages of 30 and 40, much younger. than in previous waves.

“We get people in their third and fourth decades, otherwise healthy with no real pre-existing conditions, unvaccinated and very sick, very quickly,” he said. ‘We hardly see any vaccinated patients.’

Louisiana has one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the country at about 36 percent fully vaccinated, CDC data shows.

The low rate shows. In a release on Tuesday, the Louisiana Department of Health revealed that 94 percent of the state’s 19,200 cases in May were among people who had not completed their vaccine series.

The data is very clear,” said Louisiana state health officer Dr. Joseph Kanter, in the press release.

‘COVID-19 cases among unvaccinated people in Louisiana are on the rise. COVID-19 hospitalizations, percent positivity, and COVID-19 outbreaks are all on the rise.

“All people in Louisiana, especially those who have not yet been vaccinated, need to know that they are now at increased risk of exposure to COVID-19 due to the more transmissible Delta variant, and they should consider their personal risk and that of theirs.” family.’

Meanwhile, the White House said on Friday that Florida is responsible for one in five new COVID-19 cases in the US in the past week.

According to data from the CDC, 7,011 new cases had been reported as of July 14, with a seven-day moving average of 5,621.

Despite the growing number of cases, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis promised not to issue any mandates or orders.

“No mandates for anything, these are individual choices,” DeSantis said at a news conference Tuesday.

“I made comments in late April or early May, I said, ‘Look, this is a seasonal pattern’ We knew it would be low in May and it was low, and we knew when at the end of June, July, it would would go up, and that was because it was like that last year and it’s not unique to just Florida.”

Israel once led the entire world in the vaccine race, vaccinating 61% of the population with the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, but now the country is dealing with a spate of cases

Israel once led the entire world in the vaccine race, vaccinating 61% of the population with the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, but now the country is dealing with a spate of cases

The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is ‘weaker’ against the Indian ‘Delta’ variant than health officials had hoped, a new report from Israel says.

On Friday, Prime Minister Naftali Bennett held a conversation about the corona virus with his cabinet in the Kirya in Tel Aviv.

Israel once led the entire world in the vaccine race, vaccinating 61 percent of the population with the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, but now the country is dealing with a spate of cases.

As of June 6, the vaccine offers 64 percent protection against infection by the variant, according to the Israeli government

At the moment there is a spreading idea that the protective capacity of the existing vaccines against the Delta mutation is weaker than we had hoped,” Bennett said.

‘We don’t know exactly to what extent the vaccine helps, but it is significantly less. We are all hoping for a delay, but the facts right now are that there is no delay, not here and not in the world.”

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