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Head of Space Force is hurling Russia for trailing American espionage satellite with TWO spacecraft

Gen. John Raymond, head of space operations for the US Space Force, confirmed that two Russian satellites have followed an American espionage satellite on Monday.

Gen. John Raymond, head of space operations for the US Space Force, confirmed that two Russian satellites have followed an American espionage satellite on Monday.

A top Space Force official has pulled out Russia because he is chasing an American espionage satellite with two spacecraft.

Gen. John Raymond, the head of space activities for America’s newly-minted Space Force, said the two Russian satellites in November began to chase the US satellite of several billion dollars and sometimes had flown it within 100 miles.

“This is unusual and disturbing behavior and can create a dangerous situation in space,” Raymond said in a statement Business insider.

“The United States finds these recent activities worrying and does not reflect the behavior of a responsible spacefaring nation.”

The US has raised concerns about Moscow through diplomatic channels, Raymond said Time magazine, in which stalking was reported on Monday.

The confrontation marks the first time that the US military has publicly identified an immediate threat to a specific US satellite by an opponent.

Pentagon, White House and Congress donors have said that Russia’s actions demonstrate the need for space power, which became the sixth military branch when President Donald Trump signed the $ 738 billion National Defense Authorization Act in December.

Space fanatic Michael Thompson expressed concern about one of the maneuvers of the Russian satellite on Twitter at the end of last month. He shared the image above that shows the path of the US satellite US 245 in blue and the Russian satellite Cosmos 2542 in purple

Space fanatic Michael Thompson expressed concern about one of the maneuvers of the Russian satellite on Twitter at the end of last month. He shared the image above that shows the path of the US satellite US 245 in blue and the Russian satellite Cosmos 2542 in purple

Space fanatic Michael Thompson expressed concern about one of the maneuvers of the Russian satellite on Twitter at the end of last month. He shared the image above that shows the path of the US satellite US 245 in blue and the Russian satellite Cosmos 2542 in purple

US military analysts first learned about the Russian mission when a spacecraft launched into orbit on November 26 – the Cosmos 2542 – was unexpectedly split in two about two weeks later.

Further inspection revealed that the second smaller satellite – Cosmos 2543 – was effectively ‘born’ from the first.

“The way I imagine it is like Russian nesting dolls,” Raymond told Time. “The second satellite came from the first satellite.”

The Russian Ministry of Defense confirmed the divorce on December 6 and said the purpose of the experiment was to “assess the technical state of domestic satellites,” according to the TASS news agency.

The statement was called into question in mid-January when analysts noticed that the two satellites were flying close to the US satellite USA 245.

The satellite is one of four in a reconnaissance constellation codenamed Keyhole / CRYSTAL – KH-11 for short – which is managed by the National Reconnaissance Office, a secret intelligence agency based in Virginia.

The sensors and cameras of KH-11 satellites would focus on the secret military installations of foreign opponents. They work in a polar orbit a few hundred kilometers above the earth’s surface, so that they can cover the whole.

One of those satellites, the US 224, is widely believed to have taken the very detailed picture of the Imam Khomeini space center in Iran that President Donald Trump posted on Twitter in August.

Shown: launch of a Soyuz 2-1v rocket with the Cosmos 2542 satellite

Shown: launch of a Soyuz 2-1v rocket with the Cosmos 2542 satellite

Shown: launch of a Soyuz 2-1v rocket with the Cosmos 2542 satellite

Space fanatic Michael Thompson worried about the maneuvers of Cosmos 2542 on Twitter at the end of last month.

“This is all indirect evidence, but there are many circumstances that make it look like a well-known Russian inspection satellite is inspecting a well-known American espionage satellite,” Thompson tweeted on January 30.

He suggested that Cosmos 2542 may come close to US 245 to take intelligence photos of the satellite or that it might be in a position to weaken it.

Russia has a number of communication satellites above the earth that the Kremlin could use to gather intelligence or even eliminate or destroy other satellites, according to The ride.

This could possibly herald a new era of ‘space war’, in which armed satellites in orbit try to conquer terrain on satellites from other countries.

Thompson shared the above image on Twitter, which illustrates the distance between the two satellites, with dates on the x-axis and kilometers on the y-axis

Thompson shared the above image on Twitter, which illustrates the distance between the two satellites, with dates on the x-axis and kilometers on the y-axis

Thompson shared the above image on Twitter, which illustrates the distance between the two satellites, with dates on the x-axis and kilometers on the y-axis

Thompson said the orbiting periods of the satellites were spaced apart for less than a second, meaning that Cosmos 2542 “hangs around the US 245 in consistent image”

HAVE SATELLITES EVER COLLECTED IN SPACE?

In the decades since humanity first launched satellites, there have only been four known collisions between two such objects in space.

But experts say that satellite crashes are more common in the future.

The first took place in 1991, when, according to ESA, the Russian Cosmos 1934 was hit by a piece of Cosmos 926.

Five years later, the French Cerise satellite was hit by a piece of an Ariane 4 rocket.

Then, in 2005, the American upper phase was hit by a piece of the third phase of a Chinese rocket. In 2009, an Iridium satellite hit the Russian Cosmos-2251.

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