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Has Russia run out of drones? Vladimir Putin’s troops appear to have used up supply of weapon

Has Russia run out of drones? Vladimir Putin’s troops appear to have exhausted the supply of weapons that terrorized Kyiv

  • Russia has apparently run out of Iranian-supplied kamikaze drones.
  • Two bases in Russia hit on Monday, demonstrating Kyiv’s ability to hit deep targets
  • Western officials said they believed the Kremlin had used all of Tehran’s drones.
  • Iran is expected to replenish Moscow’s Shahed-136 stocks and supply ballistic missiles.

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Apparently, Russia ran out of Iranian-supplied kamikaze drones that caused massive damage in Ukrainian cities.

The setback to Moscow’s blitz campaign yesterday came when a third of its airbases went up in flames.

Two bases were attacked on Monday, likely by Ukrainian drones, damaging aircraft and highlighting Kyiv’s ability to hit targets deep inside Russia.

Western officials said last night they believed the Kremlin had exhausted all Tehran-supplied kamikaze drones.

The Iranian regime sold several hundred UAVs to the Kremlin earlier this year. The most effective was the Shahed-136 used to terrorize Kyiv in October and November.

Apparently, Russia Has Run Out Of The Iranian-Supplied Kamikaze Drones That Caused Enormous Damage In The Cities Of Ukraine.  Pictured: Ukraine Shows Rescuers Working At The Site Of A Drone Strike In Kyiv On October 17.

Apparently, Russia ran out of Iranian-supplied kamikaze drones that caused massive damage in Ukrainian cities. Pictured: Ukraine shows rescuers working at the site of a drone strike in Kyiv on October 17.

Two Bases Were Attacked On Monday, Likely By Ukrainian Drones, Damaging Aircraft And Highlighting Kyiv'S Ability To Hit Targets Deep In Russia.  Pictured: Smoke Billowing From A Building Attacked By A Drone In Central Kyiv On October 17.

Two Bases Were Attacked On Monday, Likely By Ukrainian Drones, Damaging Aircraft And Highlighting Kyiv'S Ability To Hit Targets Deep In Russia.  Pictured: Smoke Billowing From A Building Attacked By A Drone In Central Kyiv On October 17.

Two bases were attacked on Monday, likely by Ukrainian drones, damaging aircraft and highlighting Kyiv’s ability to hit targets deep in Russia. Pictured: Smoke billowing from a building attacked by a drone in central Kyiv on October 17.

Low-flying drones struck residential blocks, killing civilians. The Russians launched them in batches of ten, securing at least one or two evaded air defense systems. Most were shot down.

While this tactic ensured that some hit their targets, it also meant that Russia spent them more quickly. The absence of the Shahed-136s over the Ukraine for a fortnight led to speculation that cold weather was compromising their effectiveness, but none are now believed to remain in the Moscow arsenal.

Unlike most drones that return to base after dropping their payload, the simplistic Shahed-136 are destroyed on impact.

A Russian Drone Is Seen During An Attack By Russian Drones, Which Are Considered By Local Authorities To Be Iranian-Made Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.  Drones Now In Short Supply Caused Tragedy In Kyiv

A Russian Drone Is Seen During An Attack By Russian Drones, Which Are Considered By Local Authorities To Be Iranian-Made Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.  Drones Now In Short Supply Caused Tragedy In Kyiv

A Russian drone is seen during an attack by Russian drones, which are considered by local authorities to be Iranian-made unmanned aerial vehicles. Drones now in short supply caused tragedy in Kyiv

Iran Is Expected To Replenish Moscow'S Shahed-136 Stocks And Supply Ballistic Missiles.

Iran Is Expected To Replenish Moscow'S Shahed-136 Stocks And Supply Ballistic Missiles.

Iran is expected to replenish Moscow’s Shahed-136 stocks and supply ballistic missiles.

Iran is expected to replenish Moscow’s Shahed-136 stockpiles and supply ballistic missiles.

But it may have reneged on these promises, perhaps fearing more Western economic sanctions. He wants sanctions lifted in exchange for giving up his nuclear weapons program.

The Russian airbase burned down yesterday was near the city of Kursk, just north of Ukraine. Clouds of black smoke were seen after an oil storage tank was hit. No casualties were reported.

Surrounded By Sandbags Stacked Against More Russian Shelling, A Mother Gazes Lovingly At Her One-Week-Old Daughter In The Intensive Care Unit At Okhmmatdyt Hospital, Kyiv.

Surrounded By Sandbags Stacked Against More Russian Shelling, A Mother Gazes Lovingly At Her One-Week-Old Daughter In The Intensive Care Unit At Okhmmatdyt Hospital, Kyiv.

Surrounded by sandbags stacked against more Russian shelling, a mother gazes lovingly at her one-week-old daughter in the intensive care unit at Okhmmatdyt Hospital, Kyiv.

However, the bases attacked on Monday were far deeper into Russia and the attacks are expected to cause concern among civilians who have increasingly opposed Russian President Vladimir Putin’s war. They can also force the Kremlin to move its long-range Tupolev bombers to better-protected facilities.

A Western official said: “Russia will likely regard the attacks as some of the most strategically significant force protection failures since its invasion of Ukraine.”

The Engels-2 airbase in the Saratov region is 372 miles from the nearest Ukrainian territory, while the Dyagilevo airbase in the Ryazan region is 285 miles inside Russia.

Moscow said Soviet-era drones had been used in Monday’s attacks. Ukrainian special forces may also have been involved. Some aircraft were damaged and three people were killed in Dyagilevo.

When asked about the attacks, Ukraine’s Defense Minister Oleskiy Reznikov repeated an old joke that blamed cigarettes on carelessness. “Very often Russians smoke in places where smoking is prohibited,” he said.

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Jacky

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