Has part of the plane from Amelia Earhart been found? Divers repair glass near Papua New Guinea

More than 80 years after the famous pilot with her navigator disappeared somewhere in the Pacific, divers claim they may have found part of the Emilia Earhart aircraft submerged in an island in Papua New Guinea.

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Divers have explored wreckage off the coast of Buka Island, 100 feet below the ocean surface.

A recent dive, a piece of glass that shares & # 39; a number of consistency & # 39; with landing lights from Earhart & # 39; s Lockheed Electra 10E has been restored.

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Buka Island, an island of Papua New Guinea in the Solomon Sea, southwestern Pacific, where a new theory says that the plane of Amelia Earhart may have crashed

Buka Island, an island of Papua New Guinea in the Solomon Sea, southwestern Pacific, where a new theory says that the plane of Amelia Earhart may have crashed

A piece of glass (photo) that shares & # 39; a number of consistency & # 39; with landing lights from Earhart & # 39; s Lockheed Electra 10E was restored during a recent dive in the area

A piece of glass (photo) that shares & # 39; a number of consistency & # 39; with landing lights from Earhart & # 39; s Lockheed Electra 10E was restored during a recent dive in the area

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A piece of glass (photo) that shares & # 39; a number of consistency & # 39; with landing lights from Earhart & # 39; s Lockheed Electra 10E was restored during a recent dive in the area

& # 39; The wreck location of Buka Island was right on the Amelia and Fred flight path and it is an area that has never been searched by anyone & # 39 ;, said Bill Snavely from Project Blue Angel, who undertook the dive.

He has been studying the site for 13 years and on the 2018 expedition that collected the glass collected measurements and other data to help evaluate the crash location.

Snavely believes that Amelia and Fred have flown for around 12 hours and turned around because they had too little fuel.

& # 39; What we have found so far corresponds to the aircraft that she has flown & # 39 ;, he claims.

& # 39; Amelia & # 39; s Electra has undergone specific adjustments for its specific journey, and the fact that some of those unique adjustments seem to have been verified in the wreck that has been found, we truly believe that this is most likely the real thing & "Said Jill Meyers, Blue Angel's public relations manager."

Divers investigating part of the wreckage that some believe to be Amelia Earhart's aircraft

Divers investigating part of the wreckage that some believe to be Amelia Earhart's aircraft

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Divers investigating part of the wreckage that some believe to be Amelia Earhart's aircraft

& # 39; We want to emphasize that this apparent aircraft debris field is ultimately not that of Amelia Earhart & # 39; s Electra & & # 39 ;, the researchers said.

& # 39; However, some unique identifying features are consistent, and time, distance, and fuel calculations are consistent with Bill & # 39; s theory of its flight path.

Project members also say a local Pacific Islander who witnessed a plane crash at the site in 1937 or around that year, was recorded and passed on in the oral history by the residents of the island.

& # 39; This crash site may indeed contain the clues for solving one of the greatest mysteries of all time & # 39 ;, the project says.

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& # 39; Anyway, we hope to find out who died in this crash and who gave up their families. & # 39;

Divers have explored wreckage off the coast of Buka Island, 100 feet below the ocean surface and say they have found a piece of glass that & # 39; a number of consistency & # 39; shares with landing lights from the Earhart plane. Pictured, Earhart standing in front of the Lockheed Electra in which she disappeared in 1937.

Divers have explored wreckage off the coast of Buka Island, 100 feet below the ocean surface and say they have found a piece of glass that & # 39; a number of consistency & # 39; shares with landing lights from the Earhart plane. Pictured, Earhart standing in front of the Lockheed Electra in which she disappeared in 1937.

Amelia Earhart and navigator Fred Noonan tried to fly around the world by plane when they disappeared on July 2, 1937. Their remains have never been positively identified, but one research group is convinced that they have crashed on a remote island in the Pacific

Project Blue Angel plans to make a new expedition to Buka in the spring that will use advanced imaging technologies.

It is also trying to raise $ 200,000 GoFundMe for the project.

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& # 39; This apparent wreck location is right on the route that Amelia has traveled, in an area that has never been searched & # 39 ;, says the team behind an upcoming film to reveal the search.

HOW DID AMELIA EARHART ON THE ISLAND OF BUKA?

& # 39; The wreck location of Buka Island was right on the Amelia and Fred flight path and it is an area that has never been searched by anyone & # 39 ;, said Bill Snavely from Project Blue Angel, who undertook the dive.

& # 39; The wreck location of Buka Island was right on the Amelia and Fred flight path and it is an area that has never been searched by anyone & # 39 ;, said Bill Snavely from Project Blue Angel, who undertook the dive.

& # 39; The wreck location of Buka Island was right on the Amelia and Fred flight path and it is an area that has never been searched by anyone & # 39 ;, said Bill Snavely from Project Blue Angel, who undertook the dive.

For the past 13 years, Bill Snavely has studied and investigated a reported location of an aircraft wreck in the nearby coastal waters of Buka Island near Papua New Guinea.

The site is located about 100ft (35m) below the surface of the ocean and appears to be a plane debris similar to the Lockheed Electra 10E in which Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan disappeared on July 2, 1937.

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Bill heard from this site in 2005 with a local correction officer from Buka.

In 2011, the local government officially asked Bill to investigate the location and determine and authenticate the aircraft.

The government has given the team exclusive rights to dive and explore this site for the next five years.

For the past 13 years, Bill Snavely has studied and investigated a reported location of an aircraft wreck in the nearby coastal waters of Buka Island near Papua New Guinea.

For the past 13 years, Bill Snavely has studied and investigated a reported location of an aircraft wreck in the nearby coastal waters of Buka Island near Papua New Guinea.

For the past 13 years, Bill Snavely has studied and investigated a reported location of an aircraft wreck in the nearby coastal waters of Buka Island near Papua New Guinea.

This apparent wreck location is located directly along the route that Amelia has traveled, in an area that has never been searched.

Bill seems to be the first to search for Amelia's plane by departing west from Lae, Papua New Guinea at the start of her escape route and moving east.

Bill & # 39; s theory is that Amelia and Fred flew about 12 hours and turned around because they ran out of fuel.

Last year an in-depth study compiled the details of the harrowing final days of Amelia Earhart.

In the week after her plane disappeared on July 2, 1937, there were 120 reports from around the world claiming to have picked up radio signals and emergency calls from Earhart – of which 57 were determined to be credible.

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An effort led by Richard Gillespie, executive director of The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, analyzed these latest broadcasts and painted a spooky image of their increasingly desperate situation over the course of seven days.

Challenging one of the widespread theories, claiming that her Lockheed Electra crashed and sank into the ocean, the emergency calls suggest that Earhart and a badly wounded Fred Noonan were stranded on a reef at the mercy of the tides.

Researchers analyzed 120 reported emergency signals from Earhart after she disappeared and found 57 credible. They say the signals all refer to Gardner Island as the source, because the clarity of the messages received increases as the island gets closer, the listeners were

Researchers analyzed 120 reported emergency signals from Earhart after she disappeared and found 57 credible. They say the signals all refer to Gardner Island as the source, because the clarity of the messages received increases as the island gets closer, the listeners were

Researchers analyzed 120 reported emergency signals from Earhart after she disappeared and found 57 credible. They say the signals all refer to Gardner Island as the source, because the clarity of the messages received increases as the island gets closer, the listeners were

The extensive new study from the Earhart Project of TIGHAR selects every emergency call received in the week after the pilot's disappearance, and reveals a chronological chronology of the events that have occurred.

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These heartbreaking messages were picked up all over the world by naval stations that actively participated in the search, and informal listeners in their homes.

On Friday, July 2, after her disappearance became known, a channel leading the search heard a voice thought to be heard.

And when asked to confirm with a series of dashes, three stations heard the answer and someone picked up the word & # 39; Earhart & # 39 ;.

WHAT ARE THE THEORIES ABOUT THE LAST DAYS OF AMELIA EARHART?

Theory One: Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan collide a few miles short of their destination on the Pacific due to visibility and gas problems and die immediately.

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Theory Two: Earhart and Noonan land on the island of Nikumaroro, where they later die from coconut crabs, which are looking for food at night and are three meters long. The name comes from their ability to open the hardened shells of coconuts.

Theory Three: Earhart and Noonan bow down drastically and land near the Mili Atoll on the Marshall Islands. They are rescued but soon taken as prisoners of war by the Japanese and sent to a camp in Saipan. Noonan is beheaded and Earhart dies in 1939 from malaria or dysentery.

Theory Four: Earhart and Noonan reach Howland Island as planned and are eaten by cannibals.

Theory Five: Earhart was an American spy who was sent to collect information about the Japanese prior to World War II.

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Theory Six: Earhart and Noonan are unable to find Howland Island and go to their & # 39; emergency plan & # 39 ;. After a ten-hour journey back to the location where they came from, they crashed into the jungle of East New Britain Island, in what is now known as Papua New Guinea.

The alleged details of Earhart's last flight, and where she is supposed to have arrived on the basis of various theories over the years

The alleged details of Earhart's last flight, and where she is supposed to have arrived on the basis of various theories over the years

There are several conflicting theories about the disappearance of Earhart. The alleged details of Earhart's last flight, and where she is supposed to have arrived on the basis of various theories over the years

In the week after her plane disappeared on July 2, 1937, there were 120 reports from around the world claiming to have received radio signals and emergency calls from Earhart - of which 57 were determined to be credible

In the week after her plane disappeared on July 2, 1937, there were 120 reports from around the world claiming to have received radio signals and emergency calls from Earhart - of which 57 were determined to be credible

In the week after her plane disappeared on July 2, 1937, there were 120 reports from around the world claiming to have received radio signals and emergency calls from Earhart – of which 57 were determined to be credible

The researchers are working on the theory that Earhart had its Lockheed Electra landed on a reef that surrounds the islands, where it has been sitting for at least a week (mock-up image)

The researchers are working on the theory that Earhart had its Lockheed Electra landed on a reef that surrounds the islands, where it has been sitting for at least a week (mock-up image)

The researchers are working on the theory that Earhart had its Lockheed Electra landed on a reef that surrounds the islands, where it has been sitting for at least a week (mock-up image)

Later that evening, a housewife from Amarillo, Texas heard later in the second & # 39; active period & # 39; signaling that Earhart said she was down on an unknown island – small, uninhabited & # 39 ;.

The broadcast went on to say that the plane was a part on land, a part in water & # 39; and that the navigator Fred Noonan was seriously injured and immediately needed medical help.

That same evening, a woman from Ashland, Kentucky, heard that Earhart claimed the plane & # 39; down in the ocean & # 39; and & # 39; on or near a small island & # 39; lay.

The timing of the distress signals, which came & night, coincided with ebb patterns on the reef. Researchers say this is the only time that Earhart would have been able to run the engine of the aircraft without the propeller hitting the water to power her radio

The timing of the distress signals, which came & night, coincided with ebb patterns on the reef. Researchers say this is the only time that Earhart would have been able to run the engine of the aircraft without the propeller hitting the water to power her radio

The timing of the distress signals, which came & night, coincided with ebb patterns on the reef. Researchers say this is the only time that Earhart would have been able to run the engine of the aircraft without the propeller hitting the water to power her radio

She continued: & # 39; Our plane has run out of gas. Water all around. Very dark, & # 39; before we continue to call a storm and winds blow.

& # 39; I have to leave here, & # 39; she said. & # 39; We can't stay here long. & # 39;

Almost all signals that are considered credible can be traced back to Gardner Island, where Earhart and Noonan were probably stranded on a reef.

But, Gillespie explains in the new article, where sending from this place is a dilemma.

& # 39; The radio & # 39; s relied on the aircraft's batteries, but battery power was needed to start the generator-equipped starboard engine to charge the batteries & # 39 ;, the researcher writes.

& # 39; If the lost pilots ran out of batteries to send emergency calls, they could not start the engine.

& # 39; The only wise thing you could do was to send radio calls only when the engine was on and the batteries were charging. But the tide comes on the reef and the tide goes out. & # 39;

According to Gillespie, building up earlier research done with colleague Bob Brandenburg, the signals could only be sent if the water was below 26 centimeters, leaving the screw point free.

As suspected, Gillespie found that the timing of the emergency calls corresponds to periods when the water on the reef would have been low.

Most were sent overnight, probably because darkness offered cooler temperatures after long days in the harsh island sun.

Each period of active broadcast lasted about an hour, with a period of silence that lasted about an hour and a half in between.

Gillespie repeats this every day until high tide or daylight.

Heartbreaking emergency calls were picked up all over the world by naval stations that actively participated in the search, and informal listeners in their homes. Earhart can be seen above on the wing of her plane before her last flight in 1937

Heartbreaking emergency calls were picked up all over the world by naval stations that actively participated in the search, and informal listeners in their homes. Earhart can be seen above on the wing of her plane before her last flight in 1937

Heartbreaking emergency calls were picked up all over the world by naval stations that actively participated in the search, and informal listeners in their homes. Earhart can be seen above on the wing of her plane before her last flight in 1937

On Saturday, July 3, during the sixth active period, a male voice was heard for the first time, suggesting that Noonan, while injured, was still alive and & # 39; functioned rationally & # 39 ;.

The next day, a 16-year-old boy in Wyoming heard that the pilot said the ship was on a reef. And the station on Howland Island heard both a man's voice and a woman's voice, with the message & # 39; tell the man well & # 39 ;.

Only once did the crew send morse code, because neither was skilled in the art.

A & # 39; poorly coded & # 39; message received by the US naval radio facility in Wailupe, near Honolulu, on July 5 stated: & # 39; 281 North Howland Call KHAQQ Beyond North Don't stay with us, shut off much longer. & # 39;

Among the most famous are the excerpts heard by 15-year-old Betty Klenck in St. Petersburg, Florida, the same day.

With the help of her family's radio, Klenck heard exchanges between Earhart and Noonan that showed that the injured navigator had become irrational.

In 1940, bones were discovered on Gardner Island - now called Nikumaroro (photo) - 400 miles south of Earhart & # 39; s planned stopover on Howland Island. An expert in skeletal biology now believes that the bones for & # 39; 99% are likely & # 39; Earhart & # 39; s

In 1940, bones were discovered on Gardner Island - now called Nikumaroro (photo) - 400 miles south of Earhart & # 39; s planned stopover on Howland Island. An expert in skeletal biology now believes that the bones for & # 39; 99% are likely & # 39; Earhart & # 39; s

In 1940, bones were discovered on Gardner Island – now called Nikumaroro (photo) – 400 miles south of Earhart & # 39; s planned stopover on Howland Island. An expert in skeletal biology now believes that the bones for & # 39; 99% are likely & # 39; Earhart & # 39; s

The two were heard to call for help and to discuss the rising water urgently.

According to Klenck, Noonan could also be heard screaming and complaining about his head.

In her notes, Klenck wrote that Earheart & # 39; said a few curses and it seemed that she had trouble getting water so high that the plane was slipping. & # 39;

The shipment ended shortly thereafter.

According to Gillespie, the last active period took place on Wednesday, July 7, from 12:25 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The investigator's estimates indicate that the water level would have reached the cabin – and the transmitter – by 6 am the following morning.

The photo shows how the high water experienced the reef on Gardner Island

The photo shows how the high water experienced the reef on Gardner Island

The photo shows how the high water experienced the reef on Gardner Island

In one of the latest terrifying messages, Thelma Lovelace from St Johns, New Brunswick, heard: & Can you read me? Can you read me? This is Amelia Earhart. This is Amelia Earhart. Come in. & # 39;

She then gave up the longitude and latitude that Lovelace had written down and later lost.

Then Earhart continued: & # 39; We have absorbed water, my navigator is badly injured. My navigator is badly injured. We need medical care and need help; we can't hold on much longer. & # 39;

After Wednesday, July 7, there were no more credible signals, making the last moments of Earhart and Noonan a mystery.

& # 39; At some point between 1:30 AM on Wednesday, July 7, when the last Credible Beyond a Reasonable Doubt broadcast was sent, and the morning of Friday, July 9, the Electra was washed over the reef in the ocean where it broke up went and sank, & Gillespie wrote.

& # 39; On the morning of Friday, July 9, three US Navy research aircraft from the battleship USS Colorado flew over Gardner Island, no aircraft was seen. & # 39;

A set of bones discovered on Gardner Island in 1940, now known as Nikumaroro, provided what is considered one of the best proofs for the doomed pilot's final resting place.

According to Richard Jantz, an expert in skeletal biology at the University of Tennessee who analyzed the skeleton, the remains for her are & # 39; 99% likely & # 39 ;.

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