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Dr. William Li, researcher at Harvard, has investigated specific compounds in certain foods that support the body's five major defense systems and recommend specific "doses" of foods to help combat conditions such as cancer and cardiovascular disease (some combinations shown)
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We all know that blueberries are full of health-giving nutrients, and cabbage is next to broccoli at the top of vegetable vitality tasks, but who knew that a generous portion of oyster sauce can also help protect you against disease?

Already this week in the Daily Mail, we are serializing a groundbreaking new book by Dr. William Liv, Harvard physician and scientist.

His lifelong work focuses on the study of the body's five most important defense systems – immunity, stem cells, intestinal bacteria, blood vessels and DNA protection – and research into specific compounds in certain foods that support them.

For example, oysters have been shown to contain natural compounds that support the body's disease-fighting mechanisms and protect your DNA from the kind of damage that Alzheimer's, cancer and depression cause.

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Dr. William Li, researcher at Harvard, has investigated specific compounds in certain foods that support the body's five major defense systems and recommend specific "doses" of foods to help combat conditions such as cancer and cardiovascular disease (some combinations shown)

Harvard scientist Dr. William Li has investigated specific compounds in certain foods that support the body's five major defense systems and recommend specific "doses" of foods to help combat conditions such as cancer and cardiovascular disease (some combinations shown)

In fact, those useful "bioactive substances" are super-concentrated when they are reduced to oyster sauce.

With this kind of insight, Dr. Li believes that you can achieve optimum health and give your body the best possible chance to fight to keep you healthy by eating food every day to support every immune system.

Today Dr. Li shows how the study of nutrients has become so advanced that we can now recommend specific 'doses' of certain foods, convinced that the amount contains exactly what your body's immune system needs to prevent a certain disease. to combat.

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In yesterday's extension, we explained the important role of your blood vessels (a system called angiogenesis). These days the focus is on DNA and its incredible ability to protect you against diseases.

A Harvard top physician reveals which food you should eat to make your body stress-resistant

Most of us think that DNA is our genetic blueprint, but it is also one of the most important systems that helps us defend against diseases.

In fact, it regulates repair mechanisms that protect us from the aging process and damage caused by sunlight, household chemicals, stress, poor sleep and a poor diet.

When this system does not work effectively, you run an increased risk for the full spectrum of cancers, as well as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

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Your DNA consists of all genes that you have inherited from your parents.

WHAT OTHER DAMAGE DNA?

Sunshine: Research has shown that harmful UV rays from the sun that penetrate our skin can produce 100,000 lesions in our DNA every hour if we are not shielded.

Radon: Radiation from the ground is the leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers.

To smoke: There are an estimated 4,000 chemicals in cigarette smoke, many of which cause inflammation and 70 have been shown to be carcinogenic (carcinogenic).

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The bad news is that passive smoking is equally damaging to the DNA of friends, family, colleagues & even pets.

solvents: Gases from carpets, new cars and chemicals in ordinary household products such as nail polish remover, shampoo and paint can damage your DNA.

It forms the "source code" of your body, on which every aspect of your health depends on keeping you alive and functioning normally.

However, DNA is quite fragile and has been the target of cruel attacks throughout your life.

Pollution, industrial toxins, ultraviolet radiation and emotional stress cause damage to our genetic code, as do inflammation and infections. These all contribute to more than 10,000 harmful events per day.

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When DNA is affected, genes can become defective. Some effects, such as aging, wrinkled skin, can be seen. Other effects can be insidious and invisible and can cause cancer or damage to the brain, heart, lungs and other organs.

Almost every type of cancer can be pinned to DNA damage. The best example is skin cancer caused by DNA damage in the skin caused by UV rays from the sun.

Other cancers can be caused by repeated damage to the DNA in specific cells, including cancer of the lungs, bladder, esophagus, stomach, and colon.

Precancerous lesions (such as polyps in the gut and changes in breast or cervical tissue) are invariably filled with cells that contain DNA to be repaired.

Cancer treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation can also damage the DNA in healthy cells, which can even lead to secondary cancers.

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Some medical imaging procedures, from X-rays to CAT and PET scans, provide radiation that can also traumatize normal DNA.

Autoimmune diseases, such as celiac disease, rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's, can also cause DNA damage in the organs affected by an overactive immune system.

Some conditions, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, major depression, atherosclerosis and autoimmune diseases, can be passed on for generations, making some people more vulnerable to DNA damage than others.

Fortunately, your DNA is hardwired to protect itself against the consequences of this damage, but, as I explain on the back page of this pullout, certain foods can help.

Two apples a day to help beat cancer … just one prescription food to combat diseases

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Bioactive substances – naturally occurring compounds in certain foods – can act as medicines because they affect our cells and the biological systems in our body in a way that resembles medicines.

And just as scientists are able to isolate the biochemical components of different drugs and analyze their impact on how our bodies fight disease, we can now disassemble specific plant-based substances in different foods and use rigorous scientific methods to measure drug-like effects on your cells.

Dr. Li said that a "food dose" is the amount of food or drink that has been shown to be associated with or leads to a specific health outcome (file photo)

Dr. Li said that a "food dose" is the amount of food or drink that has been shown to be associated with or leads to a specific health outcome (file photo)

Dr. Li said that a "food dose" is the amount of food or drink that has been shown to be associated with or leads to a specific health outcome (file photo)

This means that it is possible for the first time to use the specific & # 39; doses & # 39; of certain foods that are necessary to achieve a measurable effect.

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Simply put, a & # 39; food dose & # 39; is the amount of food or drink that has been shown to be associated with or leads to a specific health outcome.

This dose may be relevant for disease prevention or treatment, long-term management of a condition or suppression to prevent the disease from recurring.

My team has been able to make a direct comparison of the potency of different foods versus drugs, in relation to one of the most important mechanisms for body health: angiogenesis (the creation of new blood vessels).

HOW THE & # 39; DOSES & # 39; OF THE FOOD ARE DISCOVERED

This is how we determine the food doses on this page:

  • We start with amounts of food identified by clinical studies or research into real dietary patterns of large populations and analyze their health effects.
  • We look at whether the benefits associated with the food match what we know about the "bioactive" constituents of the food in the five health defense systems. This helps us to ensure that they act to maintain health and to ward off diseases.
  • We translate how much food was consumed and how often in doses.
  • We analyze the bioactive substances and look for their effects in studies that are used for pharmaceutical research. The activities of these substances are then translated into their amounts in food, to determine whether the required dose of food would be realistic to consume.

For example, we investigated four anti-cancer drugs and seven other common drugs (such as anti-inflammatory drugs, statins, blood pressure medication, and an antibiotic) against 16 nutritional factors associated with reducing the risk of various cancers.

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Remarkably, we discovered that 15 of the nutritional factors were more powerful than one of the anticancer medicines.

Most foods had their own soil, or were more powerful than the other common drugs.

Statisticians and nutrition scientists may tell you that this type of research does not affect the cause and effect of drug research with mice or a clinical trial.

But the associations that arise can be very informative, especially when hundreds, thousands or hundreds of thousands of people are involved.

A mountain of research has shown how specific food can influence health and illness.

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Science is constantly evolving, but some extraordinary clinical and epidemiological findings give us new perspectives on not only the species, but also the amounts of food we should eat, as well as how often we should eat them.

Our results must surely force even the most hard-boiled cynic to pause and be amazed at the power of what Mother Nature has sprinkled in her food.

I have noticed that the concept of food doses mainly affects patients who suffer from cancer. For example, studies in people with colon cancer have shown that eating two servings of nuts (14 walnuts) per week is associated with a 42 percent lower risk of recurrence of the disease. This statistic results in a no-brainer recommendation for a cheap lifestyle change.

For breast cancer, robust studies show that consuming 10 g of soy protein (equivalent to 235 ml of soy milk) per day is associated with a 29 percent reduction in the risk of death from the disease. You cannot ignore this type of information if you witness the evidence.

And it is useful for guiding your dietary choices if you are trying to prevent a disease such as cancer.

NOTE: Foods are so powerful that they can interact with medication, so if you are currently fighting a disease, consult your doctor before changing how you eat.

FROM BROCCOLI TO OYSTERS – HOW TO PROTECT YOUR DNA

Pollution, industrial toxins, emotional stress and ultraviolet radiation all cause damage to our genetic code.

When DNA is damaged, as we have seen, genes can become defective. This can cause physical symptoms such as wrinkles or damage to organs such as the brain, heart, and lungs. It has also been associated with cancer.

Certain food and drink can help protect DNA against these attacks.

Dr. Li, pictured, said that red and pink fruits, oranges, broccoli, and seafood have all been proven to have benefits

Dr. Li, pictured, said that red and pink fruits, oranges, broccoli, and seafood have all been proven to have benefits

Dr. Li, pictured, said that red and pink fruits, oranges, broccoli, and seafood have all been proven to have benefits

When we read about nutrition and health, antioxidants are common. These are advertised as natural substances in "superfoods" that can neutralize free radicals and offer a number of benefits, from fighting cancer to anti-aging. This general wisdom is correct.

Free radicals are highly reactive compounds that are produced by the chemical reactions that take place in the body. Our body tries to reduce the amount of free radicals with the help of antioxidants produced by our cells.

If free radicals overwhelm natural antioxidants, they can cause a condition in cells called oxidative stress that can damage our DNA.

Many foods contain bioactive chemicals with antioxidant properties. Most nutrition books describe the importance of micronutrients as the building blocks for normal DNA.

These include vitamins A, B, C, D and E, found in spinach, carrots, red peppers, lentils, string beans and mushrooms, as well as eggs, cod liver oil, sardines, and mackerel.

Minerals such as magnesium found in almonds, oatmeal and bananas, or zinc found in oysters, crab and lobster, all also make a useful contribution to the maintenance of DNA repair mechanisms.

The Mediterranean diet – characterized by fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, olive oil and fish – consists of foods that are known to be high in antioxidants and have anti-inflammatory and DNA-restoring properties.

WELLNESS SHEET TIP

Wellness Journal Tip from Drs Chris & Xand van Tulleken

Ditch processed snacks; if you need to snack, choose dried fruit and raw nuts (in small quantities).

Foods that contain antioxidants can potentially neutralize harmful oxidizing chemicals in the bloodstream, but that can only protect DNA from damage – and that's just part of protecting your genetic code.

If you smoke, are exposed to environmental toxins or have a chronic inflammatory condition, the antioxidants in your food may have limited success.

However, studies show that some foods can accelerate the repair of broken DNA after the damage has occurred. For example, carrots, kiwi and hake contain compounds that can help repair DNA through cellular & # 39; machines & # 39; to activate to solve problems.

Other foods, including soy, turmeric and coffee, can activate protective genes and mitigate the effects of harmful.

There is also food that has been shown to affect DNA in your favor. Knowing this makes it possible to use food choices to protect, repair and correct your DNA to defend your health.

Here are some DNA-boosting foods with proven benefits …

Red and pink fruit

It is worth taking a shot of tomato, watermelon, pink grapefruit or guava juice before you go into the sun.

The lycopene that they contain has been shown to help protect against sun damage caused by UV rays.

Studies show that the DNA cannot repair after damage, but it has a protective effect before exposure. It can also protect you against x-rays.

Lycopene also provides protection against DNA damage caused by the bacteria H.pylori, which lives in the stomach and can cause gastritis, ulcers and even stomach cancer.

oranges

Oranges are known for their high vitamin C content, but research shows that they contain active compounds that can also improve the ability of the blood to protect DNA.

Although the study used 415 ml of juice, you will always benefit more if you eat the whole fruit.

Berries

Red and dark colored berries contain many active substances (bioactive substances) with antioxidant effects that help protect DNA.

Broccoli

Like other cruciferous vegetables, broccoli contains sulforaphane that has been shown to reduce the genetic activity of certain cancer cells (file photo)

Like other cruciferous vegetables, broccoli contains sulforaphane that has been shown to reduce the genetic activity of certain cancer cells (file photo)

Like other cruciferous vegetables, broccoli contains sulforaphane that has been shown to reduce the genetic activity of certain cancer cells (file photo)

Researchers in Italy and Denmark discovered that bioactive substances in broccoli (240 grams that were eaten every day for ten days) protected smokers against DNA damage.

The beneficial effect stopped as soon as they took broccoli from their diet.

Just like other cruciferous vegetables (bok choy, kale and cabbage) it contains sulforaphane. This has been shown to reduce the genetic activity of certain cancer cells, as well as that of tumor suppressor genes that activate a defense against cancer.

Oysters and oyster sauce

Oysters are a great source of the amino acid taurine, which protects DNA against damage caused by free radicals. It also contains the amino acid cysteine ​​and peptides that create a powerful antioxidant called glutathione.

Oyster sauce is a particularly powerful DNA protector, because oysters are boiled down to create an extract that contains concentrated bioactive substances. Add oyster sauce for taste and DNA protection when you make stir-fry.

seafood

Seafood has antioxidant effects that prevent DNA destruction (file photo)

Seafood has antioxidant effects that prevent DNA destruction (file photo)

Seafood has antioxidant effects that prevent DNA destruction (file photo)

Seafood has antioxidant effects that counteract the destruction of DNA caused by free radicals, which, if left unchecked, could otherwise become cancerous.

Salmon is a good source, but hake is at the top of the list.

This is closely followed by cockles and cockles, fresh tuna and kingfish.

Studies show that a high intake of marine omega-3 fatty acids (100 g per day) is associated with a 46 percent lower risk of aggressive colon cancers.

Turmeric

The most important bioactive in turmeric is curcumin, which has been shown to increase the activity of tumor suppressor genes, especially those associated with colon cancer and leukemia.

Curcumin also protects the health of your blood vessels and studies show that it can cause DNA changes that cause brain cancer cells to die.

herbs

Rosemary, basil, marjoram, sage, thyme and peppermint contain rosmarinic acid, which, according to scientists, can prevent the blocking of tumor-suppressing genes in human breast cancer cells.

… AND THE FOOD TO AVOID

Fatty food

Fat-rich diets have been shown to cause changes in DNA that affect the ability of the liver to regenerate. Because the liver is the key to detoxifying the blood, it can lead to an accumulation of toxins and contribute to inflammation.

Processed meat

Meat processing can generate chemicals called advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that cause inflammation, oxidative stress in cells, and damage your DNA.

Studies also show that the preservatives and the high salt content in ham, bacon, hamburgers and sausages can also speed up the aging process.

Red meat

Unprocessed red meat – in moderation – contains useful compounds such as vitamin B and iron, but it also has unhealthy saturated fats, associated with an increased risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease.

It also contains a compound that your gut bacteria metabolize to produce a chemical called trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). This is related to the development of obesity, diabetes, gastrointestinal cancer and heart disease.

Sugary drinks

One can of sugary or artificially sweetened carbonated drink per day is sufficient to significantly speed up the aging process – almost as much as cigarette smoking.

Extracted by LOUISE ATKINSON from Eat To Beat Disease: The Body’s Five Defense systems and the Foods that can save you Dr. Life William Li published by Vermilion in paperback for £ 16.99.

To order a copy for £ 13.60 (offer valid until 9/23/19; P&P free for orders over £ 15), call 0844 571 0640.

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