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Harrowing moment cops pull grandma delivering DoorDash from sinking SUV in Arizona floodwaters

Arizona police saved a grandma delivering DoorDash with her dog from her sinking SUV that was caught by floodwaters during a monsoon.

Sue Teders, of Apache Junction, said she was stuck in the mud last Thursday when a flash flood pushed her car through trees and slammed it against a guardrail, where officers rushed to her rescue. 

Dramatic footage captured the moment the officers arrive at the scene, warning Teders that her car was going to be completely submerged by the waters as they break the SUV’s windows and urge her to reach out for them.

Teders desperately pleads for them to rescue her dog first, but the officers tell her they need to get her out first before the car sinks into the rushing floodwaters. 

‘Give me your hand. Come on,’ the officer reaching for Teders desperately yells as the woman cries for her dog. ‘Hurry, the water is coming.’

The harrowing save in Arizona mimicked the countless rescues taking place in Kentucky, where unprecedented floodwaters have submerged whole streets and claimed at least 37 lives, including four children.

Apache Junction Police officers pulled out grandmother Sue Teders from her sinking car after it was caught in a sudden monsoon last week. The officers desperately pleaded for Teders to reach out for them

Apache Junction Police officers pulled out grandmother Sue Teders from her sinking car after it was caught in a sudden monsoon last week. The officers desperately pleaded for Teders to reach out for them

Teders was out delivering DoorDash with her pup in tow when a flash flood took control of her vehicle

Teders was out delivering DoorDash with her pup in tow when a flash flood took control of her vehicle

The officers were able to break the SUV's windows and pull Teders out of the sinking vehicle

The officers were able to break the SUV’s windows and pull Teders out of the sinking vehicle 

The grandmother pleaded with officers to rescue her dog, but they said they needed to ensure her safety first

The grandmother pleaded with officers to rescue her dog, but they said they needed to ensure her safety first

Teders (pictured) said she was grateful to the police department for getting to her quickly and saving her life

Teders (pictured) said she was grateful to the police department for getting to her quickly and saving her life

Teders grandson, Connor Smith, said he came to her aid after her SUV was taken by the flood, but the dangerous waters made it impossible for him to reach her, AZ Family reported. 

Smith immediately called 911, and although the officers were able to rescue Teders, they were unable to get the dog out of the car before it was taken by the water. 

Teders said she was heartbroken over losing her 11-weeks old pup, Claire, who she decided to take with her during the DoorDash delivery. 

‘It was my turn to be her support, to get her out. And I couldn’t,’ Teders told AZ Family. ‘So the guilt of that, first of all for taking her with me, which I very seldomly did, taking her with me and having that happen, I was telling my granddaughter, how do you get over that?’ 

Since the rescue last week, neighbors have come out to help the family look for the missing dog in hopes that it survived, but there is still no sight of the pooch. 

Despite her grief, Teders said she was ultimately grateful to the Apache Junction Police Department for saving her. 

‘They were there as quickly as they could go and I know they had other rescues to deal with,’ Teders said. ‘Without them where would I have been? So thank you.’ 

Officers arriving at the scene found Teder's SUV nearly completely submerged by the floodwaters

Officers arriving at the scene found Teder’s SUV nearly completely submerged by the floodwaters 

The rescue workers desperately clung onto Teder's hands as they managed to pull her out

The rescue workers desperately clung onto Teder’s hands as they managed to pull her out

Throughout the rescue, Teders was crying for officers to rescue her dog as well, but they could not locate her

Throughout the rescue, Teders was crying for officers to rescue her dog as well, but they could not locate her

Teders said she was heartbroken over the loss of her pup, Claire, who neighbors are still trying to locate

Teders said she was heartbroken over the loss of her pup, Claire, who neighbors are still trying to locate 

Teder’s rescue was one of several conducted in the Apache Junction after a monsoon suddenly struck the area on Thursday, and it resembled the rescue of a 17-year-old Kentucky teen and her pup from their flooded home after the state suffered its deadliest storm in history. 

Quick-thinking Chloe Adams put her dog, Sandy, in a plastic container that could float before swimming to her neighbor’s roof, where she waited five hours to be rescued amid the calamitous flash floods in Whitesburg, Kentucky. 

In an image posted online by her father, brave Chloe was seen sitting on the peak of a rooftop, soaked through, and completely encircled by unprecedented floodwater.

She sat on the summit with her pup in the torrential rain for five hours before being saved on Thursday during Kentucky’s most deadly flood in history.   

Speaking about the horrific ordeal, Chloe told DailyMail.com: ‘When I realized I had to get out I instantly began to put a plan together to get me and my dog out safely. 

‘I tested to see if Sandy would be able to swim and when she couldn’t I looked for floating objects that would safely get her across. 

‘I first tried her dog bed and that quickly sunk, so then I tried a plastic container but she was too heavy for that, then I found a couch cushion and put the plastic container on top allowing her to get across the waters safely.’ 

Chloe’s father Terry Adams wrote on social media: ‘My daughter is safe and whole tonight. She saved her dog by putting her in a container that would float and then swam with her to a neighboring rooftop. 

‘She waited hours until she could be rescued. She is a hero. I love you Chloe. You are simply amazing. We lost everything today…everything except what matters most.’

The family have started a GoFundMe page after their lives were devastated by the flooding in eastern Kentucky. 

Chloe Adams, 17, is pictured sitting on her neighbor's rooftop with her dog Sandy, curled up in a plastic container, after the horrific flooding destroyed her home and she was forced to wait five hours to be rescued last Thursday

Chloe Adams, 17, is pictured sitting on her neighbor’s rooftop with her dog Sandy, curled up in a plastic container, after the horrific flooding destroyed her home and she was forced to wait five hours to be rescued last Thursday 

Chloe said she 'prepared herself for death' in the moments she realized she had to evacuate her home and swim to a neighboring roof to safety. She has been hailed a hero for her brave actions, while the death toll in Kentucky rises to 37

Chloe said she ‘prepared herself for death’ in the moments she realized she had to evacuate her home and swim to a neighboring roof to safety. She has been hailed a hero for her brave actions, while the death toll in Kentucky rises to 37

A group of stranded people are rescued from the flood waters of the North Fork of the Kentucky River in Jackson, Kentucky

A group of stranded people are rescued from the flood waters of the North Fork of the Kentucky River in Jackson, Kentucky

This comes as the death toll hit 37 in Kentucky, with hundreds of people displaced and temporarily housed and thousands still without power. 

Gov Bashear said that the number of fatalities is expected to increase Tuesday after telling a press conference: ‘I know we found more bodies overnight and this number will grow.’ 

He updated the nation this morning since the state is set to be hit with another intense weather front in the coming days – scorching temperatures.

After days of catastrophic rainfall, he said: ‘It’s going to be really hot, and really dangerous.’ 

Kentucky are now having to set up cooling centers because the state is bracing for high temperatures this week – fearing that there may not be enough drinking water available. 

So far, Kentucky Police have provided over 1,000 wellness checks for missing people desperately try and locate lost friends and family in the hardest-hit areas. 

TRAGIC SIBLINGS: From left to right - Maddison Noble, eight, Nevaeh Noble, four, Riley Jr., six, and Chance Noble, one and a half, all drowned in the Kentucky floods, according to their mother's cousin

TRAGIC SIBLINGS: From left to right – Maddison Noble, eight, Nevaeh Noble, four, Riley Jr., six, and Chance Noble, one and a half, all drowned in the Kentucky floods, according to their mother’s cousin 

'MULTIPLE FAMILIES WILL BE LOST': Lewis Ritchie, pulls a kayak through the water after delivering groceries to his father-in-law on July 28 outside Jackson, Kentucky

‘MULTIPLE FAMILIES WILL BE LOST’: Lewis Ritchie, pulls a kayak through the water after delivering groceries to his father-in-law on July 28 outside Jackson, Kentucky

DEADLY STORM: A house is seen half submerged by flood waters from the North Fork of the Kentucky River in Jackson, Kentucky. The death toll, which is expected to continue rising, has now reached 19

DEADLY STORM: A house is seen half submerged by flood waters from the North Fork of the Kentucky River in Jackson, Kentucky. The death toll, which is expected to continue rising, has now reached 19

DESTRUCTION: A car is submerged in flood waters along Right Beaver Creek, following a day of heavy rain in in Garrett, Kentucky

DESTRUCTION: A car is submerged in flood waters along Right Beaver Creek, following a day of heavy rain in in Garrett, Kentucky

Dramatic drone footage over Hindman, one of the hardest hit cities in eastern Kentucky, showed several homes and buildings almost completely submerged by the flooding, with only their rooftops of some visible.

Last week, homes with families inside were ‘completely swept away in the middle of the night, possibly while they were sleeping,’ in the violent mega storms that have plagued the state.

Raging thunderstorms pummeled the area, causing mudslides and ‘years’ worth of damage in what has been Kentucky’s most devastating flood in history. 

Waterlocked, saturated ground continued to swell on Friday while rivers and creeks burst their banks with additional downpours over the weekend.

It will take the hundreds of people whose homes have been submerged in the dire flooding years to rebuild and recover from this cataclysmic disaster, Beshear said on Friday. 

Devastating images show the catastrophic destruction the flooding has caused, with vehicles floating through streets which now resemble rivers and lakes.

DEADLY FLOODS: A shocking aerial view of homes submerged under flood waters from the North Fork of the Kentucky River in Jackson, Kentucky, on July 28

DEADLY FLOODS: A shocking aerial view of homes submerged under flood waters from the North Fork of the Kentucky River in Jackson, Kentucky, on July 28

Reggie Ritchie comforts wife Della as they pause while clearing out their destroyed home destroyed by the flooding in Fisty, Kentucky on July 29

Reggie Ritchie comforts wife Della as they pause while clearing out their destroyed home destroyed by the flooding in Fisty, Kentucky on July 29

A rescue team evacuate residents from their homes in a boat through flooded streets, in Breathitt County, Ky.

A rescue team evacuate residents from their homes in a boat through flooded streets, in Breathitt County, Ky.

President Joe Biden declared a federal disaster to direct relief money to more than a dozen Kentucky counties.

The flooding extended into western Virginia and southern West Virginia.

Gov. Jim Justice declared a state of emergency for six counties in West Virginia where the flooding downed trees, power outages and blocked roads. Virginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin also made an emergency declaration, enabling officials to mobilize resources across the flooded southwest of the state.

The deluge came two days after record rains around St. Louis dropped more than 12 inches and killed at least two people. 

Terrified residents posted alarming videos and photos of submerged cars and flooded basements on social media as the catastrophic flood levels rose. 

Emergency water rescue teams in Missouri were dispatched to assist with the historic flooding in the area – as many woke up to see their homes and vehicles submerged. 

John Ward, left, and a firefighter help Lynn Hartke wade through the flash floodwater on Hermitage Avenue in St. Louis last Tuesday following the severe flooding in the area

John Ward, left, and a firefighter help Lynn Hartke wade through the flash floodwater on Hermitage Avenue in St. Louis last Tuesday following the severe flooding in the area

Matthew Robinson holds onto his dog, Bebe, as he and his girlfriend Kimberly Tat are rescued from their home

Matthew Robinson holds onto his dog, Bebe, as he and his girlfriend Kimberly Tat are rescued from their home 

Vehicles were completely overrun with floodwater this morning after intense floods caused serious disruption

Vehicles were completely overrun with floodwater this morning after intense floods caused serious disruption 

Steven Bertke and his dog Roscoe are taken to dry land by St Louis firefighters who used a boat to rescue people from their flooded homes on Hermitage Avenue

Steven Bertke and his dog Roscoe are taken to dry land by St Louis firefighters who used a boat to rescue people from their flooded homes on Hermitage Avenue

The rain came as unprecedented weather systems battered the entire nation in July, including record-breaking heat waves in New York and Pennsylvania as roughly 85 million Americans suffered through the scorching temperatures. 

Last month, heavy rain on mountain snow in Yellowstone National Park triggered historic flooding and the evacuation of more than 10,000 people. In both instances, the rain flooding far exceeded what forecasters predicted.

Extreme rain events have become more common as climate change bakes the planet and alters weather patterns, according to scientists. 

That’s a growing challenge for officials during disasters, because models used to predict storm impacts are in part based on past events and can’t keep up with increasingly devastating flash floods and heat waves like those that have recently hit the Pacific Northwest and southern Plains.

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