Harris unveils ‘stubborn’ plan to fight immigration but admits it won’t deliver quick results

Vice President Kamala Harris admitted on Thursday that her latest strategy to tackle the causes of migration from Central America will not yield quick results as she launched a series of policies that avoid detailed targets.

She said the US alone cannot fight the factors that force people to leave Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, such as corruption and violence, but claimed the United Nations, Japan and Mexico had all agreed to support the push. .

The plans include working with the private sector to try to accelerate change in Central America.

Officials said it amounted to a “hard nose” approach.

But even Harris admitted his limitations.

“We will build on what works, and we will move away from what doesn’t work,” she wrote in a two-page letter to launch the strategy.

“It won’t be easy and progress won’t be immediate, but we’re determined to do it right.”

Vice President Kamala Harris was urged by President Biden to lead efforts to address the root causes of migration from Central America to the US.

Vice President Kamala Harris was urged by President Biden to lead efforts to address the root causes of migration from Central America to the US.

“It won’t be easy and there won’t be immediate progress, but we are determined to do it right,” Kamala Harris said in a letter as she launched the five-point plan.

Asylum-seeking migrant families from Guatemala and Honduras arrive on the US side of the riverbank on an inflatable raft after crossing the Rio Grande River into the United States from Mexico in Roma, Texas, US, July 28, 2021

Asylum-seeking migrant families from Guatemala and Honduras arrive on the US side of the riverbank on an inflatable raft after crossing the Rio Grande River into the United States from Mexico in Roma, Texas, US, July 28, 2021

Asylum-seeking migrant families from Guatemala and Honduras arrive on the US side of the riverbank on an inflatable raft after crossing the Rio Grande River into the United States from Mexico in Roma, Texas, US, July 28, 2021

The government has been under pressure for months now that the number of people arriving at the southern border is at an all-time high.

Even the scorching July temperatures haven’t reduced the numbers.

Monday night, a group of 509 migrants turned themselves in at the border in Hidalgo, Texas. Hours earlier, another group of 336 migrants was found nearby, according to Brian Hastings, the border police chief for the Rio Grande Valley, a hotspot for ariivals.

At the same time, tens of thousands of immigrants who had been detained and then released without a court date had disappeared, according to Department of Homeland data obtained by Axios.

Of the 50,000 who arrived between mid-March and mid-July, only 13 percent reported to immigration and customs authorities as instructed.

Senior government officials said Biden and Harris were adopting a “dysfunctional system.”

“For this strategy to be successful, we will have to make sustained efforts, which is both hard work over time, and a very tough approach to have an impact on the ground for the people of the region who are suffering so badly.” said one during a conversation with reporters.

The government’s strategy is divided into five parts, detailed in a White House fact sheet.

Asylum-seeking migrant families from Guatemala disembark from an inflatable raft after crossing the Rio Grande River from Mexico in Roma, Texas, US, July 28

Asylum-seeking migrant families from Guatemala disembark from an inflatable raft after crossing the Rio Grande River from Mexico in Roma, Texas, US, July 28

Asylum-seeking migrant families from Guatemala disembark from an inflatable raft after crossing the Rio Grande River from Mexico in Roma, Texas, US, July 28

Border patrol officers from the Rio Grande Valley Sector of the U.S. Border Patrol treat one of 336 undocumented migrants found crossing the United States-Mexico border into Texas on Tuesday.  The group is considered to be one of the largest cops encounter, according to Brian Hastings, Rio Grande Valley Sector's chief of patrol.

Border patrol officers from the Rio Grande Valley Sector of the U.S. Border Patrol treat one of 336 undocumented migrants found crossing the United States-Mexico border into Texas on Tuesday.  The group is considered to be one of the largest cops encounter, according to Brian Hastings, Rio Grande Valley Sector's chief of patrol.

Border patrol officers from the Rio Grande Valley Sector of the U.S. Border Patrol treat one of 336 undocumented migrants found crossing the United States-Mexico border into Texas on Tuesday. The group is considered to be one of the largest cops encounter, according to Brian Hastings, Rio Grande Valley Sector’s chief of patrol.

Part one is about tackling economic insecurity and insecurity in the region. Part two focuses on corruption by promoting the rule of law.

Pillar three deals with human rights, labor rights and a free press, while pillar four focuses on combating violence, extortion and other forms of organized crime, such as human trafficking networks.

The fifth pillar is about ‘combating sexual, gender-based and domestic violence’, according to the fact sheet.

Senior government officials told reporters the plan was “the first of its kind,” but much of it builds on previously announced initiatives.

“What we’re talking about here is much more than a US aid package,” one official said.

“We are looking at an actual building of a broader coalition that includes not only the US government and its supporters, but also members of the private sector, the foundations and the international community.”

The White House also released what it called a “Collaborative Migration Management Strategy,” which Biden ordered in February to map out how the US will work with other provinces.

Again, it summarizes previously announced initiatives.

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