Leading scientists in the world have warned that a difficult Brexit or

Leading scientists in the world have warned that a difficult Brexit or "without agreement" could paralyze science in the United Kingdom.

A survey of more than 1,000 employees at the Francis Crick Institute, the nation's largest biomedical research laboratory, reveals that 97 percent of scientists fear for the future.

They are 29 Nobel Prize-winning scientists from across Europe who wrote to the UK's Prime Minister, Theresa May, and EU President Jean-Claude Juncker.

They have urged the closest possible cooperation between the United Kingdom and the EU & # 39; after Brexit to preserve vital scientific research.

The signatories include the Nobel Prize winner and the director of Crick, Sir Paul Nurse, and the letter is directed by Venki Ramakrishnan, president of the Royal Society.

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Leading scientists in the world have warned that a difficult Brexit or "without agreement" could paralyze science in the United Kingdom. A survey of more than 1,000 employees of the Francis Crick Institute, the largest biomedical research laboratory in the country, reveals that 97 percent of scientists fear for the future (stock image)

WINNERS OF THE NOBEL PRIZE NOTICE ON THE IMPACT OF BREXIT ON SCIENCE

The best scientists from all over Europe warned that Brexit could leave Britain and the EU "more isolated", damaging research throughout the continent.

The letter was signed by 29 Nobel laureates and six winners of the Fields Medal mathematics prize.

He urged British Prime Minister Theresa May and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker to guarantee the "closest possible cooperation between the United Kingdom and the EU" after Britain leaves the bloc.

The letter said that scientific innovation "requires the flow of people and ideas across borders to allow the rapid exchange of ideas, experience and technology."

"Creating new barriers for such an easy collaboration will inhibit progress, to the detriment of all of us," the signatories said.

The British government says it is looking for "an ambitious relationship in science and innovation with our EU partners" after Brexit.

But the details of the new agreements will not be resolved until the United Kingdom leaves the bloc in March.

The two parties hope to have the contours of an agreement on future relations by then.

Worries about Brexit are high in Crick, based in London, with only 10% of scientists confident in the future of science in the UK.

Of the 97 percent who believe that a difficult Brexit will be bad for science, 76 percent said they felt very negative, while 21 percent said they felt negative.

Only four percent think that the government is committed to getting a good deal for science and only three percent think that the scientific community is being heard.

In a written statement, Sir Paul said: This survey reveals the deep feeling among scientists that a difficult Brexit will seriously damage research in the UK, and that the government is not paying enough attention to science in the United States. Brexit negotiations.

& # 39; Science and research are important for the economic growth of the United Kingdom, for the health and quality of life of the nation and for the environment.

& # 39; The overwhelming negativity of scientists towards a difficult Brexit should be a wake-up call for the country and the government.

A difficult Brexit could paralyze the science of the United Kingdom and the government needs to sit down and listen.

"We need an agreement that replaces the scientific funding lost due to Brexit, which preserves the freedom of movement for talented scientists, and makes them feel welcome in this country."

The £ 650 million Crick Institute represents a major government investment in UK science and is the largest biomedical research facility under one roof in Europe. Worries about Brexit are high, with only 10 percent of scientists confident in the future of UK science (stock)

The £ 650 million Crick Institute represents a major government investment in UK science and is the largest biomedical research facility under one roof in Europe. Worries about Brexit are high, with only 10 percent of scientists confident in the future of UK science (stock)

The £ 650 million Crick Institute represents a major government investment in UK science and is the largest biomedical research facility under one roof in Europe. Worries about Brexit are high, with only 10 percent of scientists confident in the future of UK science (stock)

The £ 650 million Crick Institute represents a major government investment in UK science and is the largest biomedical research facility under one roof in Europe.

One of Crick's main objectives is to act as a beacon for the best scientific talent in the United Kingdom and the rest of the world. It attracts leading scientists to the UK with the goal that many of them eventually bring their skills to other British institutions.

However, the survey suggests that because of Brexit, many Crick scientists are now significantly less likely to remain in the UK when they seek their next role.

Half of Crick's scientists are less likely to remain in the UK when they leave the institute (25% less likely, 26% less likely) and only 7% are confident that the UK will continue to attract the best scientific talent.

"A difficult Brexit raises the concern that there could be a significant loss of scientists from the United Kingdom, particularly the young scientific talent on which the future of the country will depend," added Sir Paul.

"This will greatly diminish our ability to make scientific discoveries that will help our country thrive, and that means we will all suffer."

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