Hamstered 1200 year old gold coins from ‘Arabian Nights’ discovered in Israel

Hoard of 1200 year old gold coins from ‘Arabian Nights’ in an old ‘piggy bank’ discovered in Israel on the fourth day of Hanukkah

  • The gold coins were found in the city of Yavneh in the central district of Israel
  • They were probably the personal savings of a potter who worked in an oven in the area
  • The site dates from the 9th century AD and would have been an industrial zone

A treasure of 1200 years old gold coins from ‘Arabian Nights’ has been found in an old ‘piggy bank’ discovered in Israel – on the fourth day of Hanukkah.

The coins were stored in a small clay juglet and were found by the Israel Antiquities Authority in Yavneh, a city in the central district of the country.

Among the golden currencies was a golden Dinar from the reign of the Caliph Haround A-Rashid – the man on which the story of the Arabian nights was based.

“This is undoubtedly a unique and exciting find especially during the Hanukkah holiday,” said one of the most important archaeologists, Liat Nadav-Ziv.

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The golden treasure was found in a small juglet, at the entrance of one of the ovens and according to archaeologists, the potter's personal savings could have been

The golden treasure was found in a small juglet, at the entrance of one of the ovens and according to archaeologists, the potter’s personal savings could have been

The treasure, from the early Islamic period, was found near the site of an old industrial area that would have been active for hundreds of years, the team said.

They were digging up a site that would eventually become a new neighborhood and the first thing the team heard about the discovery was shouting from a corner of the site.

“I ran to the screams and saw Marc Molkondov, a veteran archaeologist from the Israel Antiquities Authority, approach me excitedly,” said Nadav-Ziv.

“We quickly followed him to the field where we were surprised to see the treasure.”

Liat Nadav-Ziv (right) and Marc Molkondov (left) with the treasure discovered in the former industrial area of ​​Yavneh

Liat Nadav-Ziv (right) and Marc Molkondov (left) with the treasure discovered in the former industrial area of ​​Yavneh

Liat Nadav-Ziv (right) and Marc Molkondov (left) with the treasure discovered in the former industrial area of ​​Yavneh

The majority of the coins come from the early Abbasid period – around the 9th century AD, according to currency expert Robert Kool, who studied and dated the treasure.

“The treasure also contains coins that are rarely found in Israel,” says Dr. Cabbage.

“These are golden dinars issued by the Aghlabid dynasty that reigned in North Africa, in the region of modern Tunisia.

“[They were issued] centered in Baghdad on behalf of the Abbasid Caliphate. Without a doubt this is a great Hanukkah gift for us’.

The coins were stored in a small clay juglet and were found by the Israel Antiquities Authority in Yavneh, a city in the central district of the country

The coins were stored in a small clay juglet and were found by the Israel Antiquities Authority in Yavneh, a city in the central district of the country

The coins were stored in a small clay juglet and were found by the Israel Antiquities Authority in Yavneh, a city in the central district of the country

The large-scale excavation, southeast of Tel Yavneh, revealed an unusually large number of earthenware ovens.

The ovens were thought to be active at the end of the Byzantine period and the beginning of the early Islamic period – around the 7th to 9th centuries AD.

They would have been used for the commercial production of store pots, cooking pots and bowls, the team confirmed.

The gold and his clay pot were found at the entrance of one of the furnaces that were active on the site for centuries.

“According to archaeologists, it could have been the potter’s personal savings.

A wealth of 1200 year old gold coins from 'Arabian Nights' has been found in an old 'piggy bank' discovered in Israel - on the fourth day of Hanukkah

A wealth of 1,200-year-old gold coins from 'Arabian Nights' has been found in an old 'piggy bank' discovered in Israel - on the fourth day of Hanukkah

A wealth of 1200 year old gold coins from ‘Arabian Nights’ has been found in an old ‘piggy bank’ discovered in Israel – on the fourth day of Hanukkah

In another part of the site, the remains of a large industrial installation that was used for the production of wine from the Persian period were revealed.

“First analysis of the contents of the plant revealed old grape seeds,” Dr. Haddad from the Israel Antiquities Authority.

“The size and number of barrels found on the site indicated that wine was produced on a commercial scale, far beyond the local needs of the ancient Yavneh people.”

They were all found as part of the excavation of a site that will be turned into a new neighborhood by the Israel Lands Authority.

WHAT IS THE MYSTERIOUS ‘SWIMMING POOL’ DISCOVERED IN JERUSALEM?

A team of archaeologists from the Israel Antiques Authority dug up an old site near Jerusalem between 2012 and 2016.

The site is located in Ein Hanya, the second largest source in the hills of Judea.

Experts say that Ein Hanya was also the site of an important story described in the New Testament, in which St. Philip the Evangelist baptized an Ethiopian man and converted to Christianity.

It is unclear what the pool was actually used for, but scientists say it might have been used for baptisms.

The swimming pool dates from the Byzantine era, which took place around 1500 years ago.

Scientists think that the swimming pool (photo) may have served as a place for irrigation, washing or landscaping. It may also have been the place of a legendary New Testament baptism

Scientists think that the swimming pool (photo) may have served as a place for irrigation, washing or landscaping. It may also have been the place of a legendary New Testament baptism

Scientists think that the swimming pool (photo) may have served as a place for irrigation, washing or landscaping. It may also have been the place of a legendary New Testament baptism

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