Advertisements
Members of the Identitarian Movement protest at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Germany, with a banner with & # 39; secure borders - secure future & # 39; in August 2016

Half of Germany sees Islam as a threat, the research claims

  • The bi-annual report of the Religion Monitor found 50 percent suspicious of Islam
  • But it turned out that only 13 percent of the respondents wanted to end immigration
  • Distrust of Islam is stronger in East Germany, where far fewer Muslims live
  • 30 percent in the east do not want Muslim neighbors – only 16 percent in the west
Advertisements

One in two Germans sees Islam as a threat, according to a survey published on Thursday.

The last biennial & # 39; Religion Monitor & # 39; poll from the Bertelsmann Foundation found that 50 percent of those interviewed were suspicious of religion, Bild reported.

But only 13 percent of respondents wanted the immigration to be stopped, the religious expert of the foundation, Yasemin El-Menouar, wanted to point it out.

Members of the Identitarian Movement protest at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Germany, with a banner with & # 39; secure borders - secure future & # 39; in August 2016

Advertisements

Members of the Identitarian Movement protest at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Germany, with a banner with & # 39; secure borders – secure future & # 39; in August 2016

& # 39; Large-scale skepticism about Islam & # 39; was not necessarily the same as Islamophobia, & she said.

& # 39; Apparently many people currently view Islam less as a religion, but primarily as a political ideology and therefore exempt from religious tolerance, & # 39; said El-Menouar.

About 5 million Muslims live in Germany – 1.5 million of them live in the western state of North Rhine-Westphalia.

In East Germany, where fewer Muslims live, the attitude was more negative.

Approximately 57 percent of those surveyed saw Islam as a threat, compared to 50 percent in the West.

And 30 percent of the people in the east even went so far as to say they didn't want a Muslim for a neighbor, as opposed to 16 percent in the west.

An East German Trabant car with a sticker with Eurosceptic, anti-immigration Alternative for Germany party (AfD) candidate for Goerlitz mayor Sebastian Wippel
Advertisements

An East German Trabant car with a sticker with Eurosceptic, anti-immigration Alternative for Germany party (AfD) candidate for Goerlitz mayor Sebastian Wippel

An East German Trabant car with a sticker with Eurosceptic, anti-immigration Alternative for Germany party (AfD) candidate for Goerlitz mayor Sebastian Wippel

While the authors of the study expressed concern about the findings, attitudes toward Muslims do not seem to harden over time.

The April 2013 Religion Monitor report found that 51 percent of Germans saw Islam as a threat.

Only a third of the respondents had a positive outlook on religion.

Advertisements

By contrast, there were majorities that favor Christianity, Judaism, Hinduism, and Buddhism.

German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier (second right) talks to locals, including members of the Turkish community, on the & # 39; Open Society Day & # 39; at the Wilhelm-Hauff School in Wedding Borough of the German capital Berlin on June 15, 2019

German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier (second right) talks to locals, including members of the Turkish community, on the & # 39; Open Society Day & # 39; at the Wilhelm-Hauff School in Wedding Borough of the German capital Berlin on June 15, 2019

German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier (second right) talks to locals, including members of the Turkish community, on the & # 39; Open Society Day & # 39; at the Wilhelm-Hauff School in Wedding Borough of the German capital Berlin on June 15, 2019

The survey also raised attitudes towards democracy and found that 89 percent preferred it as a political system 30 years after the fall of the Berlin wall and the 70th anniversary of the constitution, the constitution of West Germany.

Broken down by faith, 93 percent of Christians and 91 percent of Muslims have preferred democracy, but only 83 percent of those without religion.

Advertisements

& # 39; Members of any religion can be good democrats & # 39 ;, said the author of the study and religious sociologist Gert Pickel.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news (t) immigration