Half a degree less than global warming can prevent severe weather events

A simple half-degree of global warming could have disastrous consequences for climatic conditions around the world. The research reaffirms the importance of the Paris Agreement, a treaty between 175 parties (174 countries and the European Union) that hopes to stop the steady march of global warming

A half-degree increase in global warming levels could have devastating consequences for weather conditions around the world.

Scientists believe that reducing the global warming limit by 0.5 ° C (0.9 ° F) – from 2 ° C (3.6 ° F) to 1.5 ° C (2.7 ° F) – could stop "extreme precipitation events" around the world.

Extreme rainfall can trigger a series of devastating natural events, such as overflowing rivers, floods with the potential to destroy entire cities and landslides.

The investigation reaffirms the importance of the Paris Agreement, a treaty between 175 parties (174 countries and the European Union) that hopes to stop the steady march of global warming.

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A simple half-degree of global warming could have disastrous consequences for climatic conditions around the world. The research reaffirms the importance of the Paris Agreement, a treaty between 175 parties (174 countries and the European Union) that hopes to stop the steady march of global warming

A simple half-degree of global warming could have disastrous consequences for climatic conditions around the world. The research reaffirms the importance of the Paris Agreement, a treaty between 175 parties (174 countries and the European Union) that hopes to stop the steady march of global warming

The international agreement aims to prevent temperatures from rising more than 2 ° C (3.6 ° F) in the long term, with all efforts to limit the increase to 1.5 ° C (2.7 ° F).

Limiting the global increase to 1.5 ° C (2.7 ° F) would significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change, according to new research from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

The events of extreme precipitation once every 10 years or once every 20 years could increase by 20% to 40%, if the world does not reach the goal of 1.5 ° C (2.7 ° F).

This would put countless lives at risk, warn the scientists.

The study's author, Tianjun Zhou, is a professor at the University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and specializes in statistical models.

WHAT IS THE PARIS AGREEMENT?

The Paris Agreement, which was signed for the first time in 2015, is an international agreement to control and limit climate change.

It expects to maintain the increase in global average temperature below 2 ° C (3.6 ° F) & continue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 ° C (2.7 ° F) & # 39;

It seems that the more ambitious goal of restricting global warming to 1.5 ° C (2.7 ° F) may be more important than ever, according to previous research stating that 25 percent of the world could see a significant increase in the most dry.

In June of 2017, President Trump announced his intention that the United States, the second largest producer of greenhouse gases in the world, withdraw from the agreement.

The Paris Agreement on Climate Change has four main objectives with respect to reducing emissions:

1) A long-term goal to keep the global average temperature rise well below 2 ° C above pre-industrial levels

2) Aim to limit the increase to 1.5 ° C, as this would significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change

3) Governments agreed on the need for global emissions to peak as soon as possible, recognizing that this will take more time for developing countries

4) To carry out rapid reductions thereafter according to the best available science

Source: European Commission

"As the climate warms, it is projected that both the average state and the variability of extreme rainfall will increase, which will lead to more intense and dangerous extreme events," said Professor Zhou.

Limiting global warming to 1.5 ° C (2.7 ° F), compared to 2 ° C (3.6 ° F), would reduce the exposure of the area and the population to extreme rainfall events once in 10 years or once in 20 years, approximately 20 to 40 percent. "

The researchers used a file of integrated climate models and combined them with socio-economic projections to investigate future climate changes and the impacts that accompany them.

His research focused mainly on the monsoon world, which covers a large part of the world and covers almost two thirds of the world's population.

  Scientists have discovered that by reducing the global warming limit by 0.5 ° C, from 2 ° C to 1.5 ° C, we could prevent "extreme precipitation events" from occurring. Extreme rainfall can cause rivers to overflow and flood, as the torrents of water exploit the potential to destroy entire cities.

  Scientists have discovered that by reducing the global warming limit by 0.5 ° C, from 2 ° C to 1.5 ° C, we could prevent "extreme precipitation events" from occurring. Extreme rainfall can cause rivers to overflow and flood, as the torrents of water exploit the potential to destroy entire cities.

Scientists have discovered that by reducing the global warming limit by 0.5 ° C, from 2 ° C to 1.5 ° C, we could prevent "extreme precipitation events" from occurring. Extreme rainfall can cause rivers to overflow and flood, as the torrents of water exploit the potential to destroy entire cities.

It extends north and south of the equator and is a region particularly susceptible to extreme precipitation than any other land mass on Earth.

The scientists found that by reducing the global warming limit by 0.5 ° C (0.9 ° F), a significant number of extreme rainfall events and their impacts could be avoided.

"Achieving the low-warming target of 1.5 ° C proposed by the Paris Agreement could greatly benefit the global populous monsoon region, in terms of less exposure to extremes of precipitation," Zhou said, referring to severe flooding, landslides of dirt and debris. flows that can result from excessive rain.

& # 39;[Our results] they are robust through climate models, different definitions of dangerous events, future scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions and population scenarios. "

Researchers will continue to study the physical processes of how 0.5 ° C (0.9 ° F) less warming affects extreme hazardous precipitation.

They are also calling attention and action from other regions that are most sensitive to the additional warming of 0.5 ° C (0.9 ° F).

"Among the regions of the world earth monsoon, the most affected subregions, the South African and South Asian monsoon regions, are already among the most vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change," Zhou said.

"Our results call attention to more effective adaptation activities in these sensitive regions."

The research was published in the journal Nature Communications.

WHAT ARE THE MAIN GOALS OF THE PARIS CLIMATE AGREEMENT?

The Paris Agreement on Climate Change has four main objectives with respect to reducing emissions:

1) A long-term goal to keep the global average temperature rise well below 2 ° C above pre-industrial levels

2) Aim to limit the increase to 1.5 ° C, as this would significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change

3) Governments agreed on the need for global emissions to peak as soon as possible, recognizing that this will take more time for developing countries

4) To carry out rapid reductions thereafter according to the best available science

Source: European Commission

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