Hackers take control of PGA servers and demand bitcoin rescue

Hackers take control of PGA servers and demand the rescue of bitcoins as the main golf tournament is launched

  • PGA officials discovered that their systems were compromised on Tuesday
  • The hackers took control of the servers and demanded a bitcoin ransom in return
  • The staff had tried to access the files when they were alerted to a message that the network had been punished
  • The hackers warned that any attempt to break the encryption could cause the loss of files

Associated Press

The hackers took control of the servers of PGA of America and demanded a rescue of bitcoin in the days before the start of the main golf tournament in St Louis.

PGA officials were still trying to regain control of the computer servers on Thursday, which prevented them from accessing the tournament archives.

Staff members discovered that their systems were compromised on Tuesday when attempts to access the files generated a message that the network had been penetrated, reports Golfweek.

The hackers took control of the servers of PGA of America and demanded a bitcoin rescue a few days before the start of the main golf tournament in St Louis

The hackers took control of the servers of PGA of America and demanded a bitcoin rescue a few days before the start of the main golf tournament in St Louis

The hackers took control of the servers of PGA of America and demanded a bitcoin rescue a few days before the start of the main golf tournament in St Louis

The hackers warned that any attempt to break the encryption could cause the loss of files.

The message included a Bitcoin wallet number, without indicating a rescue amount to regain control of the files.

The files included promotional banners and logos used in digital and printed communications, and digital signage in Bellerive Country Club.

Officials said part of the work had been a year in development and could not be easily replicated.

The message included a Bitcoin wallet number, without indicating a rescue amount to regain control of the files.

The message included a Bitcoin wallet number, without indicating a rescue amount to regain control of the files.

The message included a Bitcoin wallet number, without indicating a rescue amount to regain control of the files.

The hackers sent an encrypted email address so that PGA officials could send two files that they would analyze to show that they were serious.

"We only have decryption software for your situation, there is no decryption software available to the public," they wrote.

A PGA source said the organization had no plans to pay ransoms.

They had not yet regained control of their files as of Wednesday afternoon.

The PGA of America declined to comment, saying it was an ongoing investigation.

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