Home US Guest at the Antiques Roadshow bursts into tears when evaluating his deceased brother’s old Rock & Roll posters: “He loved them and I love them too”

Guest at the Antiques Roadshow bursts into tears when evaluating his deceased brother’s old Rock & Roll posters: “He loved them and I love them too”

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Through tears, the guest says: 'Wow. Wow! He loved them and I love them too. I want to do something with them, you know? I don't know what to do. Enjoy them no longer in a box'

An Antiques Roadshow guest burst into tears when told the appraised value of her deceased brother’s 1960s Rock & Roll posters.

The guest had presented James Supp with 47 posters collected by his brother between 1967 and 1969 of various rock musicians and bands for evaluation.

He quickly told Supp that before he died 28 years ago, his brother would send shipping money to rock concert promoter Bill Graham and the iconic Fillmore West music venue, and in return he would receive a poster in the mail.

When the evaluator asked her where the posters had been for nearly three decades, she recalled that her mother had removed them from the walls of her brother’s house and stored them safely in a box.

After learning how the posters had been impeccably preserved, Supp was told that the artworks had great value, highlighting one in particular as having the highest market price.

Through tears, the guest says: ‘Wow. Wow! He loved them and I love them too. I want to do something with them, you know? I don’t know what to do. Enjoy them no longer in a box’

He described a poster of Jimi Hendrix with a flying eyeball with art by Rick Griffin from 1968 as “the most iconic rock and roll posters of the ’60s,” explaining that it represented the pinnacle of ’60s psychedelic art.

Supp went on to also explain that the eyeball poster was a first edition due to the placement of the ‘Bill Graham’ and the number on the poster.

“The number on the poster is 105 for ‘Bill Graham Presents,’ and because of its placement below the word ‘tickets,’ you can tell it’s a first edition,” he told the surprised guest.

The guest was then told that since the sign had minimal damage and no pinhole marks, it could be valued between $5,000 and $7,000.

The woman was completely shocked after hearing the appraisal of the rare sign and can be heard telling Supp how “amazing it is.”

The guest had presented 47 posters collected by her brother between 1967 and 1969 of various musicians and rock bands to James Supp for evaluation.

The guest had presented 47 posters collected by her brother between 1967 and 1969 of various musicians and rock bands to James Supp for evaluation.

The appraiser then goes on to value another Jimi Hendrix poster from 1968, when he was at the peak of his career, at between $3,000 and $5,000.

Another poster of The Grateful Dead performing at Café au Go Go in Greenwich Village for the first time was also valued between $2,000 and $3,000.

He also notes that the reason all posters have different prices is because their value “not only depends on the concert or the artist who played, but also on whether it is a first edition print, printed before the concert or After the concert”. concert’.

At the end of the evaluation, Supp tells the guest that her entire collection of 47 posters would have a combined price of between $20,000 and $35,000.

He described a poster of Jimi Hendrix with a flying eyeball with art by Rick Griffin from 1968 as

He described a poster of Jimi Hendrix with a flying eyeball with art by Rick Griffin from 1968 as “the most iconic rock and roll poster of the ’60s” and explained that it represented the pinnacle of ’60s psychedelic art.

Through tears, the guest says: ‘Wow. Wow! He loved them and I love them too. I want to do something with them, you know? I don’t know what to do. Enjoy them no longer in a box.’

James Marshall ‘Jimi’ Hendrix is ​​considered the greatest and one of the most influential electric guitarists in history, despite only having a four-year professional career before his death.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame describes him as “arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music.”

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