Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Greta Thunberg’s father Svante says he thought the 16-year-old eco-crusade was a “bad idea”

Greta Thunberg’s father revealed him today thought it was a “bad idea” for his 16-year-old daughter to join the “front line” against climate change and denied that he was the brains behind her eco-campaign.

Regarding the Today program of BBC Radio 4, a guest who was edited by his daughter today, Svante Thunberg said he “didn’t skip her school” for the climate strike, but didn’t stop because her family “no longer had a fight.”

But when asked if he was proud of his daughter, who was recently named the Time magazine of 2019, he said: “Not at all. I don’t care about pride. She is happy. I am proud that I have contributed only a little. By listening to her. I’m glad we chose to listen to her. “

Thunberg also revealed that around 2016 Greta suffered from paralyzing depression and depression stopped talking and eating for three months and refused to go to school.

Thunberg said that he and Greta, mother Malena, an opera singer and former Eurovision participant, had stopped working during their daughter’s depression, calling it the “ultimate nightmare for a parent.” But he said that her fight against climate change has “saved” her, Greta adds that any personal criticism is “hilarious.”

Mrs. Thunberg’s eco-heavy Today program included an interview with Sir David Attenborough, who praised the teenager and said she “woke up the world” for climate change and achieved more in a year than in decades.

He said: ‘You have made an argument that people cannot evade. People of my generation should be very grateful to you. ”

Svante Thunberg, father of climate activist Greta Thunberg, pictured together on a zero-carbon yacht in New York in August, gave a rare interview about his daughter, denying being the driving force behind her campaign and saying her activism had helped her to beat the depression

Svante Thunberg, father of climate activist Greta Thunberg, pictured together on a zero-carbon yacht in New York in August, gave a rare interview about his daughter, denying being the driving force behind her campaign and saying her activism had helped her to beat the depression

The teenager, who this year was the catalyst for a series of protests and action against climate change, edited the BBC program Today this morning

The teenager, who this year was the catalyst for a series of protests and action against climate change, edited the BBC program Today this morning

The teenager, who this year was the catalyst for a series of protests and action against climate change, edited the BBC program Today this morning

Greta with her sister Beata, mother Malena, father Svante and their family dog ​​in Stockholm

Greta with her sister Beata, mother Malena, father Svante and their family dog ​​in Stockholm

Greta with her sister Beata, mother Malena, father Svante and their family dog ​​in Stockholm

He said, “I don’t know how she’s doing it, but she’s smiling.”

Describing how he and his wife dealt with her campaign, the Swede said: “We said,” We would not support it. If you are going to do this, you are going to do it yourself ‘.

Greta then started a school strike for the climate outside the Swedish parliament in August 2018, which has since spread around the world to involve more than 100,000 school children.

She arrived in New York in August after a 15-day 3000-mile trip across the Atlantic to participate in a UN climate summit from Plymouth. She then left the US in November for a UN climate summit in Madrid, Spain, because she refused to fly.

Her father has participated in some of these events, but denies that he is an environmentalist himself.

He said, “I did all these things, I knew they were the right things to do … but I didn’t do it to save the climate, I did it to save my child.”

“I have two daughters and to be honest they are the only thing that matters to me. I just want them to be happy ‘.

He said Greta thought her parents were “huge hypocrites” because they were active advocates for refugees, and noted that his daughter would ask “Whose human rights do you stand for?” considering that they did not take the climate problem seriously.

Thunberg said his wife stopped flying and “had to change her entire career.”

He added: “Frankly, she didn’t do it to save the climate – she did it to save her child because she saw how much it meant to her, and when she did, she saw how much she grew from that, how much energy did she get from it. “

He said he “became vegan” and Greta “got more and more energy from this.”

He added, “You think she’s not used to because she is special now, and she is very famous, and all these things. But for me she is now a normal child – she can do all things as other people can, “he said.

“She dances around, she laughs a lot, we have a lot of fun – and she is in a very good place.”

With Greta set top turn 17, he added: “If she needs me there, I’ll try to do it. But I think she will do it more and more herself, which is great. ”

93-year-old broadcaster and nature researcher Sir David Attenborough told Greta in a Skype call for the show that she “had achieved things that many of us who have worked on the problem for 20 years have not done,” adding that they are “the The only reason climate change was one of the most important issues in this month’s general election.

In a Skype call, Sir David Attenborough said to Greta: “You have made an argument that people cannot evade. People of my generation should be very grateful to you “

Greta Thunberg interviews Sir David Attenborough during part of her acquisition of the Radio 4 Today program and the 93-year-old said she has more influence on climate change than he does

Greta Thunberg interviews Sir David Attenborough during part of her acquisition of the Radio 4 Today program and the 93-year-old said she has more influence on climate change than he does

Greta Thunberg interviews Sir David Attenborough during part of her acquisition of the Radio 4 Today program and the 93-year-old said she has more influence on climate change than he does

Her concerns about the climate and the environment were central to the BBC show at Thunberg

Her concerns about the climate and the environment were central to the BBC show at Thunberg

Her concerns about the climate and the environment were central to the BBC show at Thunberg

Putting a presenter on a flight to Sweden to meet climate activist Greta Thunberg “felt uncomfortable,” the editor of the BBC Radio 4’s Today program admitted.

Program editor Sarah Sands, above, admitted she sent a presenter on a flight to Sweden to meet climate activist Greta Thunberg “felt uncomfortable”

The 16-year-old campaigner, who was the guest editor of a special edition of the show, avoids air travel due to the environmental impact.

The BBC sent presenter Mishal Husain on a return flight to Stockholm to interview her.

Program editor Sarah Sands said to the Sunday Times: “We discussed that among ourselves. It felt awkward, but we didn’t have time for trains or boats. “

The paper said that the trip to Stockholm is estimated to amount to almost half a ton of CO2 emissions per person.

Pension funds and other companies run the risk of their assets becoming worthless unless they wake up to the climate crisis, Bank of England Governor Mark Carney warned today.

Mark Carney, who will resign in March, said the efforts to stop investing in fossil fuels “were not going fast enough.”

He said that climate change was a “tragedy on the horizon” for the planet, but would also have huge costs for non-adaptive companies.

Bank of England governor Mark Carney has warned companies that their assets will be worthless unless they wake up to the climate crisis

Bank of England governor Mark Carney has warned companies that their assets will be worthless unless they wake up to the climate crisis

Bank of England governor Mark Carney has warned companies that their assets will be worthless unless they wake up to the climate crisis

There is no question that all resources that keep polluting companies in reserve can be used if the climate change goals are met, Carney said.

As a result, he said that those who did not change over time would be “stranded” with assets that they could no longer use.

His comments came during an interview with the Today program of BBC Radio 4.

A growing number of investment funds have supported so-called ‘divestment’ in recent years, which has led them to get money from fossil-fueled companies.

Activists group 350.org estimates that more than 1,100 funds, which manage assets worth £ 8.4 trillion, have committed to doing so so far.

However, in many cases, pension funds that manage the nest eggs of tens of millions of Britons have still invested in companies that, according to campaigners, contribute to or benefit from the use of fossil fuels.

FTSE 100 companies such as BP, Royal Dutch Shell, BHP Billiton, Anglo American, Rio Tinto and Centrica, for example, are all distinguished as ‘overvalued’ and ‘risky long-term investments’ due to their dependence on fossil fuels.

.