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Great moment for a diver to grab a shark to remove fish hooks near his eyes

Amazing moment divers grab a shark and put it in a giant sock to remove fish hooks near the eyes of the fish

  • Wild experts managed to free a female gray nurse shark from multiple hooks
  • The team had to squeeze the animal in a large transparent sock to get her on the boat
  • Once on the boat a vet could remove three large hooks near her eye
  • After being treated, she was released again in the waters of NSW

Naturalists managed to remove three large hooks from a gray nurse shark after luring her into a giant clear sock off the coast of New South Wales.

Experts from the Sea Life Aquarium in Sydney followed the shark to Bushrangers Bay, near Shellharbour, after reports from the public she had embedded hooks in her eyes.

Sea Life Sydney Aquarium marine scientist Rob Townsend was one of the divers who had to squeeze the animal into the big clear ‘sock’.

A team of naturalists from Sea Life Aquarium Sydney has managed to squeeze a gray nurse's shark into a large transparent sock (photo) to remove a handful of large hooks

A team of naturalists from Sea Life Aquarium Sydney has managed to squeeze a gray nurse’s shark into a large transparent sock (photo) to remove a handful of large hooks

“This is the transparent sock where we will actually drive the shark, where we will keep the animal under water for the last time,” he said.

“It’s nice and big and clear, so they don’t see it as a threat.”

Fortunately, the team was able to locate the shark relatively quickly because they worked with limited time and only had three attempts to catch the animal.

“Pope and I shadowed her on both sides, making her go to the sock. We brought her close to the sock in frustration, “Mr. Townsend said.

When they failed in their first two attempts, the team knew they were desperate times with another chance for success.

Sea Life Aquarium display manager Hope Nugent said the operation was initially extremely frustrating.

“You feel responsible if you can’t get her on the first try or the second try and you know you only have a third attempt to go. So it’s frustrating, “she said.

“We were on our last attempt and decided whether we would come in sight of the bag that Rob would try to grab her and my role in that is actually to grab him.”

The team was told by a local fisherman that the Gray Nurse Shark had embedded three large hooks near her mouth and eye and they immediately went to locate the animal

The team was told by a local fisherman that the Gray Nurse Shark had embedded three large hooks near her mouth and eye and they immediately went to locate the animal

The team was told by a local fisherman that the Gray Nurse Shark had embedded three large hooks near her mouth and eye and they immediately went to locate the animal

After safely shuffling the shark, the team veterinarian (photo) was able to remove all hooks before antibiotics and vitamins were administered and released into the ocean

After safely shuffling the shark, the team veterinarian (photo) was able to remove all hooks before antibiotics and vitamins were administered and released into the ocean

After safely shuffling the shark, the team veterinarian (photo) was able to remove all hooks before antibiotics and vitamins were administered and released into the ocean

Amazingly how the last attempt went and they were able to get the shark in the bag and on the boat.

Once on the boat, the vet, Michael Cannon, removed the three big hooks.

“After the rescue, we administered the shark with antibiotics and vitamins before she swam nicely and healthily into the ocean,” Mr. Townsend said.

‘Gang hooks are a widely used material used by fishermen and can unfortunately have devastating consequences for wildlife.

“Our advice is to avoid using stainless steel material and to use barbless circle hooks instead.”

Sea Life Sydney received approval from the Department of Primary Industries, which allowed the team to conduct Gray Nurse Shark rescue operations in specific waters outside NSW.

They will continue their work to help protect the seriously endangered animal.

Sea Life Sydney received approval from the Department of Primary Industries to permit the team to conduct Gray Nurse Sharks rescue operations in specific waters off the NSW coast

Sea Life Sydney received approval from the Department of Primary Industries to permit the team to conduct Gray Nurse Sharks rescue operations in specific waters off the NSW coast

Sea Life Sydney received approval from the Department of Primary Industries that allows the team to conduct rescue operations of Gray Nurse Sharks in specific waters off the coast of NSW

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