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Great Britain blackout scandal: almost two-thirds of internet users suffer from disruptions every month

UK blackout scandal: nearly two-thirds of internet users have monthly disruptions or painfully low speeds, report reveals

  • More than six out of ten regularly lose access to the internet at home or suffer from low speeds
  • The majority (89 percent) of these users did not receive any compensation
  • Comes from a survey of more than 2,000 adults in the UK by comparethemarket.com

More than six in ten regularly lose access to the internet at home or suffer painfully low speeds in a broadband blackout scandal.

At the same time, nine out of ten received no compensation for repeated failures and poor performance of what has become an essential service.

The situation was exacerbated by the fact that four in ten people who complained said their internet provider had handled their case badly.

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More than six in ten regularly lose access to the internet at home or suffer painfully low speeds in a broadband blackout scandal. At the same time, nine out of ten did not receive compensation for repeated failures (stock)

More than six in ten regularly lose access to the internet at home or suffer painfully low speeds in a broadband blackout scandal. At the same time, nine out of ten did not receive compensation for repeated failures (stock)

The routine disruptions occur despite the fact that households can pay more than £ 1,000 a year for a full broadband, telephone and pay TV package, which is more than the cost of gas and electricity.

The problems stem from the fact that most of the UK broadband service arrives through an old copper telephone network, some of which have been around for more than a century.

While attempting to become Tory party leader, Boris Johnson, he announced plans to deliver full-fiber ultrafast broadband nationwide by 2025, but this deadline was then set aside to achieve this as quickly as possible.

WHEN DO YOU RECEIVE MONEY FROM INTERNET OUTPUTS?

Under the current voluntary compensation scheme, no pressure is exerted on companies to improve services.

In the current structure, automatic compensation is not paid unless a blackout has taken place for at least two full working days.

Even then, the compensation level is only £ 8 with another £ 8 for every full day that is no longer committed.

New consumer research has shown that 63 percent of people suffer from broadband outages or significantly lower internet speeds at least once a month. And 89 percent received no compensation.

About 41 percent of those who complained said their broadband provider had handled the case badly. Simply contacting the company often means negotiating complex automated telephone systems and being put on hold.

In fact, making a complaint is so difficult that few people, about one in three, ever complain about poor speeds.

The research, by experts in the field of price comparison comparethemarket.com, showed that people working from home are particularly hard hit by the failing broadband system.

At the same time, the current voluntary compensation scheme does not put pressure on companies to improve services.

In the current structure, automatic compensation is not paid unless a blackout has taken place for at least two full working days.

Even then, the compensation level is only £ 8 with another £ 8 for every full day that is no longer committed.

The majority of people – 61 percent – pay a premium for so-called fast or ultra-fast fiber optic broadband that should offer download speeds between 30-100 megabytes. However, one in four said they were dealing with service errors and about the same number believe that they do not get value for money.

Holly Niblett, head of Digital at comparethemarket.com, said: “Poor connectivity is clearly a problem in the UK that undermines the government’s goal of giving all households access to super fast broadband.

While attempting to become Tory party leader, Boris Johnson, he announced plans to deliver ultra-fast broadband nationwide broadband by 2025, but this deadline was then set aside to achieve this as quickly as possible (inventory)

While attempting to become Tory party leader, Boris Johnson, he announced plans to deliver ultra-fast broadband nationwide broadband by 2025, but this deadline was then set aside to achieve this as quickly as possible (inventory)

While attempting to become Tory party leader, Boris Johnson, he announced plans to deliver ultra-fast broadband nationwide broadband by 2025, but this deadline was then set aside to achieve this as quickly as possible (inventory)

HOW FAST ARE DIFFERENT FIBER WIDTH CONNECTIONS?

Full fiber: 1 Gbps. Downloading an HD video conference or a one-hour webinar takes just a few seconds.

ultra fast: 300 Mbps. Can perform multiple online activities for multiple users simultaneously without major service interruptions.

Super fast: 30 Mbps. Under ideal circumstances it will be sufficient for your average internet user.

‘Too many customers suffer in silence, perhaps not knowing that they are missing out on compensation for poor connectivity. Switching from a broadband provider is a way to signal bad service accident and can save you money every month, as the most attractive deals are usually offered to new customers. “

The telecom regulator Ofcom has drawn up a blueprint with which the old copper wire network is torn out and replaced with fiber optic cables to all houses and businesses.

The total costs are estimated at £ 33.4 billion, which over time will be recouped from customers through their £ 5 billion invoices from taxpayers.

Ofcom’s interim president, Jonathan Oxley, said, “This is like building the Channel Tunnel, it’s a huge undertaking.” ‘The copper network has a number of very old parts and that is the problem, it is becoming obsolete.

‘Full-fiber broadband is much faster and more reliable. It is vital that people and businesses everywhere – whether in rural areas, smaller villages or towns – can enjoy these benefits. ”

WHERE ARE THE WORST PLACES FOR 4G & BROADBAND IN THE UK?

According to consumer rights advocate Which? Scotland and Wales suffer the most from both poor broadband connections and limited 4G coverage.

Also affected were the constituencies that mainly consist of urban areas – including parts of Canterbury, Macclesfield, Maidstone, Norfolk, Southampton, Surrey and York.

These were accompanied by many coastal towns – including Dover, Cleethorpes, Great Yarmouth, Scarborough, Totnes and Whitby.

The Highlands and Islands were the hardest hit parts of Scotland, with the Na h-Eileanan constituency and the worst provided with only 42 percent of the properties managed by all four network operators and only 81 percent with a decent broadband connection.

In Wales, the Dwyfor Meirionnydd constituency was the worst, with only 69 percent of the buildings with 4G coverage of all four network operators and only 91 percent with a decent broadband connection.

Meanwhile, Northern Island was also poorly served – especially in urban areas – with Armagh and Newry the hardest hit, with only 82 percent of the buildings.

According to consumer rights advocate Which? Scotland and Wales suffer the most from both poor broadband connections and limited 4G coverage

According to consumer rights advocate Which? Scotland and Wales suffer the most from both poor broadband connections and limited 4G coverage

According to consumer rights advocate Which? Scotland and Wales suffer the most from both poor broadband connections and limited 4G coverage

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