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Grans reveal which millennial expressions and words they hate the most

The English language is constantly evolving, but not everyone is enthusiastic about how much it has changed over the years.

To the great dismay of grandmothers all over the country, new words such as “hubby” and “furbaby” are nowadays commonplace, while extreme hyperbola such as “I literally died” tends to go unnoticed in daily life.

Phrases that did not exist 20 years ago, such as “a brutal Nandos,” are now simply part of our culture, while statements like “it is what it is” are becoming increasingly popular thanks to participants in shows on Love Island.

Go to the internet to share their anger in one Gransnet Thread, people have revealed exactly what words and phrases they make shiver – as well as sharing their grammatical qualities.

Talked to FEMAIL, Babbel cultural expert Claire Larkin has revealed precisely why we use these sentences and where they come from.

Gransnet-thread has revealed the words and sentences that grandmothers can't stand and cultural expert Babbel, Claire Larkin, has revealed why we use them exactly. Pictured, stock image

Gransnet-thread has revealed the words and sentences that grandmothers can’t stand and cultural expert Babbel, Claire Larkin, has revealed why we use them exactly. Pictured, stock image

MANLIVE

Shortened from ‘man’, this is an informal term that younger women use to refer to their male husbands – or occasionally to a long-term boyfriend that they are likely to marry.

Interestingly, the first use of ‘hubby’ can be traced all the way back to the 1600s.

The word was associated with home ownership, which at the time was a status symbol, and thus made these men more attractive to their potential wives.

furbaby

A furbaby is a term that refers to someone’s beloved cuddly pet – usually a cat or dog.

The word has been used as a way to recognize the important role that pets play in our lives, even to the extent that they regard them as children.

The term was first added to the Oxford Dictionary in 2015 and was followed by a sharp peak in pet spending: British spent last year the equivalent of £ 68 per person on their downy friends.

A CHEEKY NANDOS

The British slang term, “a cheeky Nandos,” refers to when someone is on their way to the popular chicken restaurant chain Nando’s for a bite to eat.

Words like 'Furbaby', which were added to the Oxford Dictionary for the first time in 2015, turned out to be one of the perpetrators that drove older women crazy. Pictured, stock image

Words like 'Furbaby', which were added to the Oxford Dictionary for the first time in 2015, turned out to be one of the perpetrators that drove older women crazy. Pictured, stock image

Words like ‘Furbaby’, which were added to the Oxford Dictionary for the first time in 2015, turned out to be one of the perpetrators that drove older women crazy. Pictured, stock image

This is usually done with a few friends after a few pints – or ‘bevs’ – in the pub.

The expression rather caused confusion in America and is considered a cultural reference that is typically British.

IT IS WHAT IT IS

The expression “it is what it is” can be traced back to a 1949 article in The Nebraska State Journal, where it was used to describe harsh environmental conditions, but would later become a popular expression in the American sports broadcast to the team to discuss losses.

In the UK, the expression has recently been revived by the reality TV program Love Island.

It was repeatedly invoked by participants who wanted to win the £ 50,000, who used the saying to show that they literally accept “as it is” a situation – whether they liked it or not.

THEIR

Not to be confused with the original ‘Hun’, which referred to a member of the nomadic tribe who was famously led by Attila the Hun, the modern use of the word ‘their’ is actually an expression of affection.

A shortened version of ‘honey’, it is the millennial way to show affection for a friend, family member or partner.

The expression is incorporated in the expression “U OK, their?”, Which is a more sarcastic colloquial language to question one’s behavior.

BABE

Just like them, “baby” is a millennial expression of affection. In jargon this can also be used when speaking to any gender, whether it is in a relationship or when it refers to a good partner.

This word can be traced back to the 1800s and was, according to the Oxford Dictionary, first used in a romantic context in 1911.

Millennial terms of affection such as “their and babe” are also not favorites of the older generation. Pictured, stock image

It is traditionally used to describe women, but began to be used to describe men in 1973.

ACTUALLY

The word ‘in principle’ is usually used to refer to the most important or important aspect of something, and the use of this term has increased sharply since the 1950s.

However, it can sometimes disrupt feathers because in some circles it is considered “inappropriate” to start a sentence with an adverb.

In short, it is a term to prevent you from lying around in formal situations – especially if it is your opening sentence.

I literally died

“Literally” comes from the Latin word littera, which means letter. It should mean that something is exactly as it is described, but it is clear that no one who uses the phrase today has died “literally.”

Instead, it is popularly used for emphasis or to express strong feelings about a situation.

Unfortunately, this is why it can be an annoying term for people who believe that the word should be used literally, because modern use turns the definition of the word upside down.

LIKE IT

“Like” is considered to be the origin of the suffix “-ly,” which means that terms such as “slow” and “sacred” are actually derived from the words “slowish” and “sacred.”

Starting a sentence with 'So' also turned out to be a pet of grandmothers. Pictured, stock image

Starting a sentence with 'So' also turned out to be a pet of grandmothers. Pictured, stock image

Starting a sentence with ‘So’ also turned out to be a pet of grandmothers. Pictured, stock image

The more modern use of the term has been associated with the Beatniks in the 1950s, and today it is used in many different contexts, more like a binding word or emphasis in sentences.

STARTING A SENSE WITH ‘SO’

“So” is a conjunction, such as “therefore,” or “however,” meaning that it has a major impact at the beginning of the sentence.

Linguists call ‘so’ a discourse marker, which is used to describe words that connect ideas in a conversation.

It can annoy some people if it is used to start a sentence without context, because it means it doesn’t connect ideas at all.

However, you have probably noticed that millennials use it so often in informal, spoken settings. So that’s just the way it is.

IN THE TREND

If you are ‘in the trend’, you think you meet the current fashion trends of that time.

This expression can be traced back to the 1950s, when it was used to describe popular emerging fashions or cultural customs, but it was originally used to describe rivers in the 1500s (“to run or bend in a certain direction”) ).

Nowadays it is also often used to describe ‘trends’ with regard to social media, which have given us the new word ‘trending’.

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