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Linda Edwards is one of the first people in the world with a 3D printed breastbone. The 52-year-old's breastbone collapsed after a heart-bypass operation in November 2016. Thanks to the transplant, she was able to hold her granddaughter Sienna, one (pictured together)

A grandmother has become one of the few people in the world with a 3D printed breastbone.

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Linda Edwards's sternum collapsed following a complication that arose during a bypass operation in November 2016.

For years, the 52-year-old pain she compared with & # 39; was wearing a heavy backpack on your front & # 39 ;. As a result, she was unable to hang up, cough or hug her grandchildren.

Business went well when she came across a documentary about a surgeon performing 3D-printed transplants.

Mrs. Edwards, from Fleetwood, Lancashire, tracked down the medication on Facebook, which led to her undergoing the procedure two years later on July 16.

She is the third person in Britain and the fifth in the world to have the & # 39; life-changing & # 39; had surgery, replacing her breastbone and part of her rib cage.

A month later Edwards can finally hold her one-year-old granddaughter Sienna without pain.

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Linda Edwards is one of the first people in the world with a 3D printed breastbone. The 52-year-old's breastbone collapsed after a heart-bypass operation in November 2016. Thanks to the transplant, she was able to hold her granddaughter Sienna, one (pictured together)

Linda Edwards is one of the first people in the world with a 3D printed breastbone. The 52-year-old's breastbone collapsed after a heart-bypass operation in November 2016. Thanks to the transplant, she was able to hold her granddaughter Sienna, one (pictured together)

Image shows the titanium sternum and part of the rib cage

Image shows the titanium sternum and part of the rib cage

Image shows the titanium sternum and part of the rib cage

X-ray shows the newly applied breast bone shortly after Mrs. Edwards had undergone the operation last month

X-ray shows the newly applied breast bone shortly after Mrs. Edwards had undergone the operation last month

X-ray shows the newly applied breast bone shortly after Mrs. Edwards had undergone the operation last month

Mrs. Edwards, a mental health care worker, saw her doctor in 2016 and complained about indigestion and heartburn.

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To relieve her discomfort, she underwent heart bypass surgery.

This means that a surgeon uses a blood vessel from the leg, arm or chest to bypass a coronary artery & # 39; it has been narrowed by plaque.

The procedure required surgeons to cut open her breastbone. When the operation was over, her breastbone was held together with threads.

CAN RIBS PRINT 3D?

Ribcages can be 3D printed from a digital file via a laser in the UK.

Parts are made up of a series of fine metal powders that are completely melted and then built up layer by layer in a thickness ranging from 20 to 100 microns. A micron is a millionth of a meter.

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This technology makes it possible to create complex shapes that cannot be made through traditional techniques, such as casting.

Other benefits are lower material use and costs, as well as products that are tailor-made and lightweight because only required substances are used.

This technique also makes mass production of devices possible, further reducing production costs.

In addition to ribs, 3D printing has been used in the dental industry to fit into frames.

Source: Renishaw

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& # 39; (The operation) actually went very well, & # 39; said Mrs. Edwards.

& # 39; However, at Christmas I started to feel something and that must have been when the wires nodded.

& # 39; The wires came loose and (my breastbone) collapsed. & # 39;

Edwards was operated on in February 2017 to put her breastbone back together.

& # 39; The surgeon put it together as well as possible, & # 39; she said.

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& # 39; It just wasn't right, it fell apart again.

& # 39; They normally said they would place a metal plate, but apparently I had nothing to put on it. & # 39;

Mrs. Edwards spent a few months with painful pain.

& # 39; The only way I can explain how painful it was, do you know when you have a backpack? That's right, but the backpack is in front, & she said.

& # 39; It was like carrying a heavy load. & # 39;

Mrs. Edwards (pictured with Sienna and her son Ashley, 26) claims that she is & # 39; incredible & # 39; feels after years of pain compared to & # 39; wearing a heavy backpack on your front & # 39;

Mrs. Edwards (pictured with Sienna and her son Ashley, 26) claims that she is & # 39; incredible & # 39; feels after years of pain compared to & # 39; wearing a heavy backpack on your front & # 39;

Mrs. Edwards (pictured with Sienna and her son Ashley, 26) claims that she is & # 39; incredible & # 39; feels after years of pain compared to & # 39; wearing a heavy backpack on your front & # 39;

Scan shows the & # 39; collapsed & # 39; Mrs. Edwards's breastbone before undergoing surgery

Scan shows the & # 39; collapsed & # 39; Mrs. Edwards's breastbone before undergoing surgery

Scan shows the & # 39; collapsed & # 39; Mrs. Edwards's breastbone before undergoing surgery

After watching a documentary about 3D-printed transplants, Edwards took on the task of bringing the surgeon Dr. Send Ehab Bishay a message.

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The doctor answered that she had to request the operation & # 39; & # 39; through her doctor.

After a lengthy two-year process, funding for the operation was approved and Dr. Bishay conducted the procedure at University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust.

The surgical team has reopened Mrs. Edwards' breast and avoided her heart and previous bypass.

& # 39; I woke up from the operation and felt awful and at one point I thought I was dead, but I feel better every day & she said.

& # 39; Doctors said to take it easy, they said jokingly: & # 39; Do not fall over because you have a lot of money in your body & # 39 ;.

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& # 39; I still feel numb because I use a lot of medicines, but the most important thing is that my rib cage doesn't keep shifting.

& # 39; It feels incredible that I have had an operation as advanced as this one. I feel like I have my life back.

& # 39; It is priceless. I can hold my granddaughter and that is the best feeling in the world. & # 39;

Dr. Bishay added: “It is fantastic to see that Mrs Edwards is doing exceptionally well given the complexity of the procedure she has gone through.

& # 39; My team and I removed Mrs. Edward's original sternum and inserted the custom-made prosthesis.

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& # 39; The plastic surgery team, led by Mr. Haitham Khalil, has harvested various muscle valves to cover all the extensive components of the prosthesis, a fundamental step in this operation.

& # 39; Fortunately, complications such as those of Mrs. Edward after rare cardiac surgery are rare, but are notoriously difficult to manage. & # 39;

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