Grandfather, 86, walks TWENTY KM a day to raise money for hospice

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Grandfather, 86, walks TWENTY KM a day to raise money for the hospice that takes care of his sisters

  • Peter Murray walks 20 miles every day around Barnet, Enfield and Haringey
  • Mr Murray has raised £967 so far and has said he will keep walking until he dies
  • Aiming to run a total of 1,000 miles, he started the challenge in April

An 86-year-old grandfather walks 1,000 miles to raise money for the hospice that takes care of his sisters.

Peter Murray, who has 12 grandchildren, walks 20 miles around Barnet, Enfield and Haringey every day from 9am to 6pm to raise money for North London Hospice.

Mr Murray, who has hitherto… raised £967, told MailOnline: ‘I want to give back to people and this country. I will walk until I die.

“I hope to show my children and grandchildren that you should be nice to people, even if they are not nice to you.”

He began his 1,000-mile challenge in April for the hospice caring for his older sisters Mary and Pat, who are in their 90s and have supported the hospice’s stores for 30 years.

Peter Murray, who has 12 grandchildren, walks 20 miles around Barnet, Enfield and Haringey every day from 9am to 6pm to raise money for North London Hospice

Mr Murray, who has raised £967 to date, told MailOnline: 'I want to give back to people and this country.  I will walk until I die.  I hope I show my children and grandchildren that you should be nice to people, even if they are not nice to you

Mr Murray, who has raised £967 to date, told MailOnline: ‘I want to give back to people and this country. I will walk until I die. I hope I show my children and grandchildren that you should be nice to people, even if they are not nice to you.”

Declan Carroll, chief executive of North London Hospice, said: ‘Peter is absolutely inspiring – he is North London’s answer to Captain Tom! I am in awe of his cheerfulness and cannot thank him enough for all he has done.

“His great fundraising enables our vital work so we can deliver the best of end-of-life life for everyone.”

Mr Murray, who lives in Enfield with his 60-year-old wife, Helen, said: ‘I’m quite slim now and reasonably healthy. People tell me you don’t look like there’s anything wrong with you. Twenty miles a day is extraordinary.”

His usual route is from his home to the nearest city center where he says hello to people. If he’s doing laps in the park, he’ll be doing three to four laps per hour. He enjoys the walks because people stop to talk to him or do part of the route with him.

And this isn’t the first time Mr. Murray has walked for a good cause.

Last year, he walked another 1,000 miles to raise money for Whipps Cross Hospital to thank you for nursing one of his sisters, Madge, through the coronavirus.

When she was fired, he cared for her until she died in July last year.

He started his last 1000 mile challenge in April for the hospice caring for his older sisters Mary and Pat, who are in their 90s.

He started his last 1000 mile challenge in April for the hospice caring for his older sisters Mary and Pat, who are in their 90s.

Mr Murray was a middle child of 15 years old with ten sisters and four brothers and walked from an early age to fetch water from the well at his home in Ireland. He also survived tuberculosis when he was a child.

His father died when he was 12 and his mother secured a job to support the family.

When he worked at a grocer, his job was to sort the tins of cookies to remove the broken ones.

Mr Murray said: ‘I purposely broke the biscuits so I could take some home as it was a treat. We’ve never had luxury. We were so poor it was unbelievable. We had nothing. Everything was second hand.’

In 1950 he came to London to earn more money to support his mother and five younger siblings in Ireland. First he washed the dishes in a hotel for £1 a week.

Mr Murray then worked at another hotel for £3 a week. When he had saved up enough money, he started selling AZ street maps in London, which eventually became his first business.

After that, Mr. Murray had his own successful shops with stands for comics, paperbacks and magazines.

He also bought and sold several properties. Now he uses the money he has earned throughout his life to support charities and continues to raise money for them.

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